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★ Normans

Normans: see France & Europe & England & War & History & Empire & Castles & Architecture & Cathedral & Italy & Crusades & Byzantine & Vikings & Middle Ages & Anglo-Saxons

Bettany Hughes TV - Michael Wood TV - Janina Ramirez TV - Simon Schama TV - The British TV - Helen Castor TV - Fergel Keane TV - Fred Dibnah TV - Sam Willis TV - William I - William of Malmesbury - Robert Bartlett TV - Dan Snow TV - David Starkey TV -    

 

 

30,089.  William and a handful of barons then imposed one of the most brutal governments this country has ever seen.  (Great Britain & England & Normans)  Bettany Hughes, Seven Ages of Britain 1066 A.D. - 1350 A.D.

 

30,090.  A mania for building massive stone structures.  (Great Britain & England & Normans & Building)  ibid.

 

30,091.  Feudalism was the key to Norman success.  (Great Britain & England & Normans)  ibid.

 

30,092.  Peasants in England were standing up for themselves.  (Great Britain & England & Normans)  ibid.

 

30,093.  The Black Death had arrived and within three years it would wipe out half of the population.  (Great Britain & England & Normans & Plague)  ibid.

 

 

30,145.  The most famous date in the history of Britain: 1066.  England in 1066 was a good place to live by the standards of the day.  (Great Britain & England & Normans)  Michael Wood, The Great British Story: A People’s History: The Norman Yoke 3/8

 

30,146.  From the start luck was against the English.  (Great Britain & England & Normans)  ibid.

 

30,147.  The Norman yoke – the loss of English liberties.  (Great Britain & England & Normans)  ibid.

 

30,148.  Domesday reveals that England in 1086 had two million people.  (Great Britain & England & Normans)  ibid.

 

30,149.  The Anglo-Saxons lived under a kind of apartheid.  (Great Britain & England & Normans & Anglo-Saxon)  ibid.

 

30,150.  The Barons forced King John to agree to limit his own power.  (Great Britain & England & Normans & John I)  ibid.

 

 

30,218.  When the Normans took over they set about remaking much of Anglo- Saxon culture into their own.  However, some remnants of the old Anglo-Saxon world endure this Norman cultural onslaught.  (England & Anglo-Saxon & Norman)  Dr Janina Ramirez, Treasures of the Anglo Saxons, BBC 2010

 

 

30,276.  The Normans were descendants of Viking raiders but had long since traded in their longboats for powerful warhorses, and the Duchy of Normandy was in no sense just a piece of France.  (Great Britain & England & Norman)  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: Conquest

 

30,277.  Finally the foot soldiers breaking into a run behind.  And then there was just the murderous smashing and crashing of horses, the slicing and thrusting of weapons, screams, cries of the wounded and dying.  (Great Britain & England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,278.  William was crowned at Westminster, Christmas Day 1066.  (Great Britain & England & Norman)  ibid.

 

 

30,422.  Over 150,000 people die or flee their homes.  Alongside murder comes the devastation of Anglo-Saxon lands ... William destroys all resistance.  (Great Britain & England & Anglo-Saxon & Norman)  The British II: People Power

 

30,423.  A network of castles appears across the land.  (Great Britain & England & Norman & Castle)  ibid.

 

 

30,476.  Matilda: the first woman to make a claim to the English throne in her own right.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  Dr Helen Castor, She Wolves: England’s Early Queens I, BBC 2012

 

30,477.  A handful of extraordinary women did attempt to rule medieval and Tudor England.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,478.  Matilda was the daughter of Henry I and granddaughter of William the Conqueror.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,479.  There was nothing explicit to say a woman couldn’t wear the crown.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,480.  Matilda might have given up on her marriage but her father hadn’t.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,481.  In 1135 ... Matilda stayed in Anjou with Geoffrey.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,482.  As soon as the news of her father’s death reached her Matilda made her first move to become queen.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,483.  While Matilda hesitated it was her cousin Stephen who seized the moment.  Stephen was a powerful man and an effective soldier.  (England & Matilda & Stephen & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,484.  Stephen’s masterstroke was his speedily arranged coronation.  (England & Matilda & Stephen & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,485.  Normandy had collapsed into anarchy and so had Stephen’s army.  (England & Stephen & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,486.  All Matilda’s hopes of being crowned queen were trampled into the dirt along with the feast she had left behind.  But things were about to get still worse.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,487.  If the she-wolf couldn’t wear the crown, her cub would.  (England & Matilda & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,488.  Eleanor wasn’t typical in anything she did.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,489.  Eleanor made a particularly powerful match – her new husband was heir to the French throne.  And within days of the wedding the old king died.  Now at the age of only thirteen Eleanor was queen of France.  Wife of King Louis VII.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,490.  Louis and Eleanor had decided to go on Crusade.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,491.  In 1168 Eleanor went to govern the Dutch [Aquitaine] in her husband’s name.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,492.  Eleanor never had a claim to be a monarch in her own right but her children did.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,493.  She rebelled against her husband.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,494.  She was captured on the road by her husband’s forces.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,495.  Richard sent word that his mother should have the power of doing whatever she wished in the kingdom.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

30,496.  It was Eleanor who secured the succession of her youngest son John.  (England & Norman & John)  ibid.

 

30,497.  Age and exhaustion caught up with Eleanor.  (England & Norman)  ibid.

 

 

31,743.  The Norman King Henry II would now be wooed by Dermot MacMurrough.  (Ireland & Henry II & Norman)  Fergal Keane, The Story of Ireland, BBC 2/5

 

31,744.  The invaders hacked and cleaved their way through the Irish.  (Ireland & Norman)  ibid.

 

31,745. Over the next fifty years the Anglo-Normans established power bases in the main population centres.  (Ireland & Norman)  ibid.

 

 

60,924.  Britain is full of magnificent examples of architectural and engineering genius.  And it stands testimony to the men who actually constructed it all and of course the architects and engineers who designed it.  (Cathedral & Building & Norman & Engineering)  Fred Dibnah’s Building of Britain e1: Mighty Cathedrals, BBC 2002 

 

60,925.  Believe it or not this is a cathedral – this is the Saxon cathedral of St Peter’s ... It’s the only Saxon cathedral in the country that survives intact.  It isn’t very big, it is?  (Cathedral & Building & Norman & Engineering)  ibid.

 

60,926.  After the Conquest the Normans began to build on a scale that had never been seen before.  (Cathedral & Building & Norman & Engineering)  ibid.

 

60,927.  The Normans didn’t want to leave anyone doubt down here on Earth who was in charge.  (Cathedral & Building & Norman & Engineering)  ibid.

 

60,928. The Normans build with semi-circular or round arches just like the Romans used to build ... It saved material; it also looked very attractive and it let lots of light flood in from the side.  (Cathedral & Building & Norman & Engineering)  ibid.

 

60,929.  The rib-vaulting was of course a new invention.  And very strong.  (Cathedral & Building & Norman & Engineering)  ibid.

 

60,930.  The Normans improved their techniques and moved on from the round arch to the pointed Gothic version.  (Cathedral & Building & Norman & Engineering)  ibid.

 

 

66,300.  Castles: they dominate our landscape, tower over our history and fuel our imagination.  (Castle & Normans)  Sam Willis, Castles: Britain's Fortified History I, Instruments of Invasion, BBC 2014

 

66,301.  The ultimate expression of military might.  (Castle & Normans)  ibid.

 

66,302.  Our story begins with the arrival of the castle with the Normans in 1066.  A weapon of invasion.  (Castle & Normans)  ibid.

 

66,303.  A ‘motte-and-bailey’ is the most basic castle design, a moat surrounded by a walled enclosure – the bailey.  (Castle & Normans)  ibid.

 

66,304.  These stone castles were utterly alien.  (Castle & Norman)  ibid.

 

66,305.  Every landowner in the realm was required to swear an oath to the king ... the Oath of Serum.  (Castle & Norman & Oath)  ibid.

 

66,306.  That man was Stephen – what followed was a protracted civil war ... One of the bleakest periods in our history.  (Castle & Stephen & England)  ibid.

 

66,307.  At 172 days the siege of Kennilworth was the longest to take place on English soil.  (Castle & Stephen & England)  ibid.

 

 

83,238.  If the Normans are disciplined under a just and firm rule they are men of great valour who ... fight resolutely to overcome all enemies.  But without such rule they tear each other to pieces and destroy themselves, for they hanker after rebellion, cherish sedition, and are ready for any treachery.  William I, attributed deathbed speech

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