Call us:
0-9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
  P2 Lodge  ·  Pacifism & Pacifist & Pacify  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (I)  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (II)  ·  Pagan & Paganism  ·  Pain  ·  Paint & Painting  ·  Pakistan & Pakistanis  ·  Palace  ·  Palestine & Palestinians  ·  Palin, Sarah  ·  Panama & Panamanians  ·  Pandemic  ·  Panspermia  ·  Paper & Papers & Paperwork  ·  Papua New Guinea & New Guinea  ·  Parables  ·  Paradise  ·  Paraguay  ·  Parallel Universe  ·  Paranoia & Paranoid  ·  Parent & Parenthood  ·  Paris  ·  Parkinson's Disease  ·  Parks & Parklands  ·  Parliament  ·  Parrot  ·  Particle Accelerator  ·  Particles  ·  Partner  ·  Party (Celebration)  ·  Party (Political)  ·  Passion & Passions & Passionate  ·  Past  ·  Patience & Patient  ·  Patriot & Patriotism  ·  Paul & Thecla (Bible)  ·  Pay & Payment  ·  PCP  ·  Peace  ·  Pearl Harbor  ·  Pen & Pencil  ·  Penguin  ·  Penis  ·  Pennsylvania  ·  Pension  ·  Pentagon  ·  Pentecostal  ·  People  ·  Perfect & Perfection  ·  Perfume  ·  Persecute & Persecution  ·  Persia & Persians  ·  Persist & Persevere  ·  Personality  ·  Persuade & Persuasion  ·  Peru & Peruvians & Moche  ·  Pervert & Peversion  ·  Pessimism & Pessimist  ·  Pesticide  ·  Peter (Bible)  ·  Petrol & Gasoline  ·  Pets  ·  Pharmaceutics & Big Pharma  ·  Philadelphia  ·  Philanthropy & Philanthropist  ·  Philippines & Filipino  ·  Philistines  ·  Philosopher's Stone  ·  Philosophy & Philosopher  ·  Phobos  ·  Photograph & Photography  ·  Photon  ·  Physics  ·  Piano  ·  Picture  ·  Pig  ·  Pilate (Bible)  ·  Pilgrim & Pilgrimage  ·  Pills  ·  Pirate & Piracy  ·  Place  ·  Plagiarise & Plagiarism  ·  Plague & Plagues  ·  Plan & Planning  ·  Planet  ·  Plants  ·  Plasma  ·  Plastic  ·  Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery  ·  Play & Players  ·  Plays  ·  Please & Pleasure  ·  Pluto  ·  Poetry & Poets  ·  Poison & Poisoner  ·  Poker  ·  Poland & Polish  ·  Polar Bear  ·  Police (I)  ·  Police (II)  ·  Policy  ·  Polite & Polite Society  ·  Politics & Politician (II)  ·  Politics & Politicians (I)  ·  Poll Tax  ·  Pollution  ·  Poltergeist  ·  Polygamy & Polygamist  ·  Pompeii & Vesuvius  ·  Ponzi Schemes  ·  Pool  ·  Poor  ·  Pop Music  ·  Pope  ·  Population  ·  Porcelain  ·  Pornography  ·  Portugal & Portuguese  ·  Possess & Possession  ·  Possible & Possibility  ·  Post & Mail  ·  Postcard  ·  Poster  ·  Pottery  ·  Poverty  ·  Power  ·  Practice & Practise  ·  Praise & Praiseworthy  ·  Pray & Prayer  ·  Preach & Preacher  ·  Pregnancy & Pregnant  ·  Prejudice  ·  Premonition  ·  Present  ·  President  ·  President & Presidency US  ·  Presley, Elvis  ·  Press  ·  Price  ·  Pride & Proud  ·  Priest & Priesthood  ·  Primates  ·  Prime Minister  ·  Prince & Princess  ·  Principles  ·  Print & Publish  ·  Prison & Prisoner (I)  ·  Prison & Prisoner (II)  ·  Private & Privacy  ·  Privatisation  ·  Privilege  ·  Privy Council  ·  Probable & Probability  ·  Problem  ·  Produce & Production  ·  Professional  ·  Profit  ·  Progress  ·  Prohibition  ·  Project for the New American Century & Foreign Policy Initiative  ·  Promise  ·  Proof & Prove  ·  Propaganda  ·  Property  ·  Prophet & Prophecy  ·  Prosperity  ·  Prostitute & Prostitution  ·  Protect & Protection  ·  Protest (I)  ·  Protest (II)  ·  Protestant & Protestantism  ·  Protons  ·  Proverbs  ·  Psalms  ·  Psychedelics  ·  Psychic  ·  Psychology & Psychiatry & Psychopathy  ·  Pub & Public House & Bar  ·  Public & Public Opinion  ·  Public Relations  ·  Public Sector & Public Services  ·  Puerto Rico  ·  Pulsar  ·  Punctuate & Punctuation  ·  Punish & Punishment  ·  Punk  ·  Pupil  ·  Puritan & Puritanism  ·  Purpose  ·  Putin, Vladimir  ·  Pyramids  
<P>
Press
P
  P2 Lodge  ·  Pacifism & Pacifist & Pacify  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (I)  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (II)  ·  Pagan & Paganism  ·  Pain  ·  Paint & Painting  ·  Pakistan & Pakistanis  ·  Palace  ·  Palestine & Palestinians  ·  Palin, Sarah  ·  Panama & Panamanians  ·  Pandemic  ·  Panspermia  ·  Paper & Papers & Paperwork  ·  Papua New Guinea & New Guinea  ·  Parables  ·  Paradise  ·  Paraguay  ·  Parallel Universe  ·  Paranoia & Paranoid  ·  Parent & Parenthood  ·  Paris  ·  Parkinson's Disease  ·  Parks & Parklands  ·  Parliament  ·  Parrot  ·  Particle Accelerator  ·  Particles  ·  Partner  ·  Party (Celebration)  ·  Party (Political)  ·  Passion & Passions & Passionate  ·  Past  ·  Patience & Patient  ·  Patriot & Patriotism  ·  Paul & Thecla (Bible)  ·  Pay & Payment  ·  PCP  ·  Peace  ·  Pearl Harbor  ·  Pen & Pencil  ·  Penguin  ·  Penis  ·  Pennsylvania  ·  Pension  ·  Pentagon  ·  Pentecostal  ·  People  ·  Perfect & Perfection  ·  Perfume  ·  Persecute & Persecution  ·  Persia & Persians  ·  Persist & Persevere  ·  Personality  ·  Persuade & Persuasion  ·  Peru & Peruvians & Moche  ·  Pervert & Peversion  ·  Pessimism & Pessimist  ·  Pesticide  ·  Peter (Bible)  ·  Petrol & Gasoline  ·  Pets  ·  Pharmaceutics & Big Pharma  ·  Philadelphia  ·  Philanthropy & Philanthropist  ·  Philippines & Filipino  ·  Philistines  ·  Philosopher's Stone  ·  Philosophy & Philosopher  ·  Phobos  ·  Photograph & Photography  ·  Photon  ·  Physics  ·  Piano  ·  Picture  ·  Pig  ·  Pilate (Bible)  ·  Pilgrim & Pilgrimage  ·  Pills  ·  Pirate & Piracy  ·  Place  ·  Plagiarise & Plagiarism  ·  Plague & Plagues  ·  Plan & Planning  ·  Planet  ·  Plants  ·  Plasma  ·  Plastic  ·  Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery  ·  Play & Players  ·  Plays  ·  Please & Pleasure  ·  Pluto  ·  Poetry & Poets  ·  Poison & Poisoner  ·  Poker  ·  Poland & Polish  ·  Polar Bear  ·  Police (I)  ·  Police (II)  ·  Policy  ·  Polite & Polite Society  ·  Politics & Politician (II)  ·  Politics & Politicians (I)  ·  Poll Tax  ·  Pollution  ·  Poltergeist  ·  Polygamy & Polygamist  ·  Pompeii & Vesuvius  ·  Ponzi Schemes  ·  Pool  ·  Poor  ·  Pop Music  ·  Pope  ·  Population  ·  Porcelain  ·  Pornography  ·  Portugal & Portuguese  ·  Possess & Possession  ·  Possible & Possibility  ·  Post & Mail  ·  Postcard  ·  Poster  ·  Pottery  ·  Poverty  ·  Power  ·  Practice & Practise  ·  Praise & Praiseworthy  ·  Pray & Prayer  ·  Preach & Preacher  ·  Pregnancy & Pregnant  ·  Prejudice  ·  Premonition  ·  Present  ·  President  ·  President & Presidency US  ·  Presley, Elvis  ·  Press  ·  Price  ·  Pride & Proud  ·  Priest & Priesthood  ·  Primates  ·  Prime Minister  ·  Prince & Princess  ·  Principles  ·  Print & Publish  ·  Prison & Prisoner (I)  ·  Prison & Prisoner (II)  ·  Private & Privacy  ·  Privatisation  ·  Privilege  ·  Privy Council  ·  Probable & Probability  ·  Problem  ·  Produce & Production  ·  Professional  ·  Profit  ·  Progress  ·  Prohibition  ·  Project for the New American Century & Foreign Policy Initiative  ·  Promise  ·  Proof & Prove  ·  Propaganda  ·  Property  ·  Prophet & Prophecy  ·  Prosperity  ·  Prostitute & Prostitution  ·  Protect & Protection  ·  Protest (I)  ·  Protest (II)  ·  Protestant & Protestantism  ·  Protons  ·  Proverbs  ·  Psalms  ·  Psychedelics  ·  Psychic  ·  Psychology & Psychiatry & Psychopathy  ·  Pub & Public House & Bar  ·  Public & Public Opinion  ·  Public Relations  ·  Public Sector & Public Services  ·  Puerto Rico  ·  Pulsar  ·  Punctuate & Punctuation  ·  Punish & Punishment  ·  Punk  ·  Pupil  ·  Puritan & Puritanism  ·  Purpose  ·  Putin, Vladimir  ·  Pyramids  

★ Press

Press: see Media & Journalist & News & Newspaper & Magazine & BBC & Write & Radio & Television

Hunter S Thompson - Louis D Brandeis & Warren - Oscar Callaway - George Carlin - Orwell Rolls In His Grave TV - Lyn Nofziger - Beginner's Guide to the New World Order - David Bowman - Hannen Swaffer - Mark Hertzgaard - Glenn Greenwald - John Pilger - esias - Mark Twain - David Mellor - John Swinton - Catherine Deneauve - Theodore Roosevelt - Richard Nixon - Hugo Black & US Supreme Court - William Cowper - Lawrence Grossman - Theodore Dreiser - Adolf Hitler - Charles Spencer - A J Liebling - Carl T Schmidt - George Best - Alfred Harmsworth - Lord Radcliffe - Junius - Joseph Pulitzer - Will Hutton - Andrew Marr TV - Panorama TV - Dispatches TV - Rebekah Brooks - Jo Becker - Sean Hoare - BBC online - Alastair Campbell - Max Clifford - Rupert Murdoch: The Power and the Story TV - Geoffrey Robertson - Greg Dyke - Murdoch: The Mogul Who Screwed The News TV - Frontline TV - John Yates - Press Complaints Commission - The Independent - Harold Evans - The Guardian - Michael Wolff - Rupert Murdoch: Battle With Britain TV - James Murdoch - Ian R Crane TV - Hacks 2011 - Paul Foot - Sex Lies & Gagging Orders TV - Diana - Katherine Graham - Edwin Arnold - Thomas Babington Macaulay - Charlton Heston - Max Mosley - Thomas Jefferson - Jo Brand - Kelly Osbourne - Christopher Hitchens - Grace Kelly - Stephen Colbert - Kate Hudson - Gore Vidal - Arthur Conan Doyle - John F Kennedy - Eugene V Debs - Felix Frankfurter - John Adams - Hugo L Black - William Blackstone - Charles Evans Hughes - James Madison - George Orwell - Lord Mansfield - Conspiracy TV - Reinventing the Royals TV - The Office US TV - Uncensored with Michael Ware TV - Patrick Henningsen - Simon Heffer - BBC News Editor - Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism 2004 - The Press 2017 -       

 

 

50,253.  The press is a gang of cruel faggots.  Journalism is not a profession or a trade.  It is a cheap catch-all for fuckoffs and misfits – a false doorway to the backside of life, a filthy piss-ridden little hole nailed off by the building inspector, but just deep enough for a wino to curl up from the sidewalk and masturbate like a chimp in a zoo-cage.  (Propaganda & Press & Journalism)  Hunter S Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas 

 

 

5,469.  That the individual shall have full protection in person and in property is a principle as old as the common law; but it has been found necessary from time to time to define anew the exact nature and extent of such protection.  Political, social, and economic changes entail the recognition of new rights, and the common law, in its eternal youth, grows to meet the demands of society.

 

The press is overstepping in every direction the obvious bounds of propriety and of decency.  Gossip is no longer the resource of the idle and of the vicious, but has become a trade, which is pursued with industry as well as effrontery.  To satisfy a prurient taste the details of sexual relations are spread broadcast in the columns of the daily papers ... The intensity and complexity of life, attendant upon advancing civilization, have rendered necessary some retreat from the world, and man, under the refining influence of culture, has become more sensitive to publicity, so that solitude and privacy have become more essential to the individual; but modern enterprise and invention have, through invasions upon his privacy, subjected him to mental pain and distress, far greater than could be inflicted by mere bodily injury.  (Freedom & Individual & Law & Press & Newspapers & Privacy)  Louis D Brandeis & Warren, The Right to Privacy

 

 

45,177.  In March, 1915, the J P Morgan interests, the steel, shipbuilding, and power interest, and their subsidiary organizations, got together twelve men high up in the newspaper world and employed them to select the most influential newspapers in the United States and sufficient number of them to control generally the policy of the daily press ... They found it was only necessary to purchase the control of twenty-five of the greatest papers.

 

An agreement was reached; the policy of the papers was bought, to be paid for by the month; an editor was furnished for each paper to properly supervise and edit information regarding the questions of preparedness, militarism, financial policies, and other things of national and international nature considered vital to the interests of the purchasers.  (Press & Newspaper)  Oscar Callaway, Congressman 1917

 

 

28,322.  I don’t take very seriously the media or the press in this country who in the case of the Persian Gulf War were nothing more than unpaid employees of the Department of Defense.  And who most of the time, most of the time function as a kind of unofficial public relations agency for the United States Government.  So I don’t really listen to them, I don’t really believe in my country and I got to tell you folks I don’t get all choked up about yellow ribbons and American flags.  (United States & Press)  George Carlin

 

 

44,910.  The press ignored or glossed over serious questions about George Bush.  From repeated allegations that he had gone AWOL to insider trading.  (Media & Bush & Press)  Orwell Rolls in His Grave 2003

 

 

33,708.  If you can control the access of the press to [Reagan], you have a hell of a lot better chance of him not screwing up.  (Reagan & Press)  Lyn Nofziger, Reagan's campaign press secretary, interview Mark Hertsgaard

 

 

35,912.  The year is 1917 and representative Oscar Calloway enters a disturbing statement into the US Congressional record.  The statement reveals why J P Morgan interests hired twelve high ranking news managers.  The twelve were asked to determine the most influential newspapers in America.  They were to figure out how many news organisations it would take to control generally the policy of the daily press of the United States.  The twelve found it was only necessary to purchase the control of twenty-five of the greatest papers ...  Soon that policy would be defined by J P Morgan and his colleagues ... The Council on Foreign Relations.  (New World Order & Council on Foreign Relations & Press & Newspapers)  Beginner’s Guide to the New World Order documentary

 

 

38,991.  Politicians on both sides, and the labour movement in general, I think are worth only contempt for their failure to stand up over this Murdoch affair.  Politicians who in the past have spoken up against Murdoch and his ownership and his citizenship and so on ... have gone so far as to say the opposite on this occasion.  (Australia & Press)  David Bowman, former editor-in-chief Sydney Morning Herald

 

 

44,822.  Freedom of the press in Britain means freedom to print such of the proprietor's prejudices as the advertisers don't object to.  (Newspaper & Press)  Hannen Swaffer

 

 

45,040.  The biggest political joke in America is that we have a liberal press.  It's a joke taken seriously by a surprisingly large number of people ... The myth of the liberal press has served as a political weapon for conservative and right-wing forces eager to discourage critical coverage of government and corporate power ... Americans now have the worst of both worlds: a press that, at best, parrots the pronouncements of the powerful and, at worst, encourages people to be stupid with pseudo-news that illuminates nothing but the bottom line.  Mark Hertzgaard

 

 

36,586.  Embedded in The New York Times’s institutional perspective and reporting methodologies are all sorts of quite debatable and subjective political and cultural assumptions about the world.  And with some noble exceptions, The Times by design or otherwise has long served the interests of the same set of elite and powerful factions.  (Elite & Press)  Glenn Greenwald

 

 

44,879.  They do have the power to act together.  I think back to the time when Rupert Murdoch moved his operation in London to his fortress in East London called Wapping when everything changed.  It was a sea-change.  In the process he sacked five thousand people just like that.  The journalists almost didn’t go.  The vote was lost in the union ballots by about half a dozen.  Now, had they voted not to go, I doubt whether that embodiment of everything that Murdoch stands for would ever have got off the ground.  So journalists do have power.  And it’s really up to them to organise that power.  (Media & Journalists & Press & Newspaper)  John Pilger, interview Melbourne 2009

 

 

45,176.  It seems that what we have now is a media echo-chamber that gives out broadly speaking the same news, the same opinions, the same message, while those who own and control the media are becoming fewer and their power greater all over the world.  (Press & Newspaper & Media & News)  John Pilger, Breaking the Mirror: The Murdoch Effect

 

44,874.  In 1986 the equivalent of an earth-quake hit Fleet Street.  Rupert Murdoch had been secretly preparing to move his newspapers to a factory in Wapping in East London surrounded by guards and razor-wire.  When he finally made his move he sacked more than five-thousand people.  (Press & Newspaper & Media)  ibid.

 

 

45,177.  Such relentless inhumanity forms the iceberg beneath the Guardian’s current exposé of Murdoch’s alleged payment of £1m hush money to those whose phones his News of the World reporters have criminally invaded.  ‘A cultural Chernobyl’, is how the German investigative journalist Reiner Luyken, based in London, described Murdoch’s effect on British life.  Of course, there is a colourful Fleet Street history of lies, damn lies, but no proprietor ever attained the infectious power of Murdoch’s putrescence.  To public truth and decency and freedom, he is as the dunghill is to the blowfly.  The rich and famous can usually defend themselves with expensive libel actions; but most of Murdoch’s victims are people like the Hillsborough parents, who suffer without recourse.  John Pilger, article New Statesman 'Murdoch: A Cultural Chernobyl'

 

 

5,220.  In damned dreams and devilish dark moments I see the horror show of deep-frozen Saturday nights fronting the gates of Hell at Murdoch’s Wapping.  The snorting leviathan lorries smashing down the hill, rage-red front covers of The Sun displayed like pirate flags in the windscreens, smashing down, down to the barbed wire and the purple-faced protesters.  Ah the jumping-jingo joy of those guardians of capitalism, the bobby-gangsta-boys in blue, and see how tenderly they finger their bully-sticks.  (Work & Trade Union & Strike & Industrial Action & Press & Newspapers & Solidarity & Demonstration)  esias   

 

 

45,042.  There are laws to protect the freedom of the press’s speech, but none that are worth anything to protect the people from the press.  Mark Twain, License of the Press 1873

 

1