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★ Parks & Parklands

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John Muir - Theodore Roosevelt - Lawrence Clark Powell - Andrew Graham-Dixon TV - Lucy Worsley TV - Wil S Hylton - Simon Schama TV - William Wordsworth - Ernest Ortega - Wallace Stegner - Shelton Johnson - Ken Burns TV - Rudyard Kipling - Wilderness Society - 38th United States Congress - Anonymous - Virginia News - Stephen Mather - Terry Tempest Williams - Nevada Barr - Bernard DeVoto - Will - Mark Twain - Michael Jackson - Barack Obama - The Acid House 1997 - The Grass Arena 1991 - New York: America's Busiest City TV -           

 

 

52,764.  Everybody needs beauty as well as bread.  Places to play in and pray in.  When Nature may heal and give strength to body and soul alike.  This natural beauty hunger is made manifest in our beautiful national parks.  Nature’s sublime wonderlands.  (Parks & Beauty & Nature)  John Muir  

 

 

47,611.  I will follow my instincts.  Be myself for good or ill.  And see what will be the upshot.  As long as I live I’ll hear waterfalls and birds and winds sing.  I’ll interpret the rocks, learn the language of flood, and storm and the avalanche.  I’ll acquaint myself with the glaciers and wild pathdoms, and get as near to the heart of the world as I can.  (Parks & Nature & Instinct & Self)  John Muir

 

 

51,519.  How far destruction may go is not easy to guess.  (Parks & Destruction)  John Muir

 

 

52,765.  That anyone would try to destroy such a place seems incredible.  But sad experiences shows that there are people good enough and bad enough for anything.  (Parks & Destruction)  John Muir

 

 

52,766.  These temple destroyers, devotees of ravaging commercialism, seem to have a perfect contempt for Nature, and instead of lifting their eyes to the god of the mountains, lift them to the almighty dollar.  (Parks & Destruction & Commerce & Capitalism & Nature)  John Muir

 

 

81,744.  The tendency nowadays to wander in wilderness is delightful to see.  Thousands of tired, nerve-shaken over-civilised people are beginning to find out that going to the mountains is going home.  That wildness is a necessity, and that mountain parks and reservations are useful ... as fountains of life.  (Mountain & Park)  John Muir

 

 

52,767.  One of the best bits of national achievement.  Theodore Roosevelt

 

 

52,768.  We have fallen heirs to the most glorious heritage a people ever received, and each one must do his part if we wish to show that the nation is worthy of its good fortune.  (Parks & United States of America)  Theodore Roosevelt

 

 

52,769.  There can be nothing in the world more beautiful than the Yosemite, the groves of the giant sequoias and redwoods, the Canyon of the Colorado, the Canyon of the Yellowstone, the Three Tetons; and our people should see to it that they are preserved for their children and their children's children forever, with their majestic beauty all marred.  (Parks & United States of America)  Theodore Roosevelt

 

 

52,770.  Keep this great wonder of Nature as it now is.  Leave it as it is.  You cannot improve it.  The ages have been at work at it and man can only mar it.  (Parks & United States of America)  Theodore Roosevelt

 

 

41,075.  Ordinarily, the man who loves the woods and mountains, the trees, the flowers, and the wild things, has in him some indefinable quality of charm, which appeals even to those sons of civilization who care for little outside of paved streets and brick walls.  John Muir was a fine illustration of this rule.  He was by birth a Scotchman – a tall and spare man, with the poise and ease natural to him who has lived much alone under conditions of labour and hazard.  He was a dauntless soul, and also one brimming over with friendliness and kindliness.

 

He was emphatically a good citizen.  Not only are his books delightful, not only is he the author to whom all men turn when they think of the Sierras and northern glaciers, and the giant trees of the California slope, but he was also – what few nature lovers are – a man able to influence contemporary thought and action on the subjects to which he had devoted his life.  He was a great factor in influencing the thought of California and the thought of the entire country so as to secure the preservation of those great natural phenomena – wonderful canyons, giant trees, slopes of flower-spangled hillsides – which make California a veritable Garden of the Lord.  (Compliment & Nature & California & Parks)  Theodore Roosevelt, ‘John Muir: An Appreciation’ Outlook vol 109, 16 January 1915

 

 

65,898.  No man was more influential than John Muir in preserving the Sierra’s integrity.  If I were to choose a single Californian to occupy the Hall of Fame, it would be this tenacious Scot who became a Californian during the final forty-six years of his life.  It was John Muir whose knowledge wedded to zeal led men and governments to establish the National Park Service.  Yosemite and Sequoia in California, the Petrified forest and the Grand Canyon in Arizona, and the glacier wilderness of Alaska are what they are today largely because of this one man, in whom learning and love were co-equal.  More than any other, he was the answer to that call which appears on the Courts Building in Sacramento: Give me men to match my mountains.  (California & Parks)  Lawrence Clark Powell

 

 

10,199.  [William Henry] Jackson’s photographs and [Thomas] Moran’s watercolours had an entirely unexpected outcome.  Congressmen in Washington were so impressed by the spectacular images that they passed a bill designated the Yellowstone region, America’s first national park.  (Art & Photography & Parks)  Andrew Graham-Dixon, Art of America 1/3, BBC 2011

 

 

30,989.  Rochester: he called it A Ramble in St James’s.  He described the park of night teeming with men and women of all ranks, all of them up to no good ... Buggeries, rapes and incest.  (England & Women & Parks)  Dr Lucy Worsley, Harlots, Housewives and Heroines: A 17th Century History for Girls III: Act Three: At Work and at Play

 

 

48,645.  The park lies directly downwind from a slew of coal plants.  Virtually all of the major contaminants in the local air and water are direct results of coal emissions.  Coal produces ozone, which kills trees.  Coal produces sulfates, which kill fish.  No other park in the country has more ozone or sulfates than Shenandoah National Park.  (Coal & Park)  Wil S Hylton

 

 

52,682.  For the first time a park meant not the private estate of some aristocrat but a public place in a town without barriers of class or property, laid out like here in Birkenhead in the 1840s with ponds and brambles and lawns.  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: Forces of Nature

 

 

52,683.  Sort of national property in which every man has a right and interest who has an eye to perceive and a heart to enjoy.  William Wordsworth, of the Lake District

 

 

52,684.  George Melendez Wright was saviour of wildlife in America’s national parks.  Ernest Ortega

 

 

52,685.  The best idea we’ve ever had.  Wallace Stegner

 

 

52,686.  Parks are like going home.  Shelton Johnson, Park Ranger

 

 

52,687.  How did we as a people get here?  I think that when people go to a National Park they get a sense of compass, to history.  Shelton Johnson 

 

 

52,688.  A desire to fully invest my physical and my spiritual self in America.  Shelton Johnson

 

 

52,689.  They are a treasure house of Nature’s superlatives.  84 million acres of the most stunning landscapes anyone has ever seen.  Ken Burns, The National Parks: America’s Best Idea: The Scripture of Nature 1851-1871

 

52,690.  Cathedrals of stone daily ornamented by cascading ribbons of water.  ibid.

 

52,691.  A geological wonderland with rivers that steam, mud that boils, amidst the greatest collection of geysers in the world.  ibid.

 

52,692.  They are more than a collection of rocks and trees and inspirational scenes from Nature ... An idea born in the United States.  ibid.

 

52,693.  The artist George Catlin ... called for the creation of a nation’s park.  ibid.

 

52,694.  Something totally unprecedented in human history – setting aside not a landscaped garden or a city park but a large tract of natural scenery for the future enjoyment of everyone.  (Parks & Nature)  ibid.

 

52,695.  It was all part, Muir said, of his unconditional surrender to Nature.  The winds and cascading creeks seemed to sing an exalting chorus audible to anyone willing to listen.  He contemplated the life of a raindrop.  (Parks & Nature)  ibid.

 

52,696.  A God who revealed Himself through Nature.  (Parks & Nature)  ibid.

 

52,697.  If Yosemite was a temple, he [John Muir] would become its high priest.  (Parks & Nature)  ibid.  

 

 

52,698.  Yellowstone: Jim Bridger, another mountain man, had also told tales of the place.  Ken Burns, The National Parks: Colters Hell 1871-1890

 

52,699.  They gave names to the other geysers too.  ibid.

 

52,700.  An unimaginable strangeness and beauty.  ibid.

 

52,701.  On March 1st 1872 President Ulysses S Grant signed the Bill creating Yellowstone Park.  ibid.

 

52,702.  This would be a national park.  The first national park in the history of the world.  ibid.

 

52,703.  The prime attractions of Yellowstone were about to be completely surrounded and exploited.  ibid.

 

52,704.  He [John Muir] had soon grown restless to travel again.  ibid.  

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