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Pirate & Piracy
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★ Pirate & Piracy

Pirate & Piracy: see Sea & Ocean & Ship & Boat & Robbery & Theft & Crime & Empire & England & Spain & Caribbean & Hijack & Somalia

In Search of … TV - Mankind: The Story of All of Us TV - The British TV - Jeremy Paxman TV - James Burke TV - Batman 1966 - Dan Snow TV - Sid James TV - Yellowbeard 1983 - Richard Zacks - Andrew Lambert - Tom Wareham - Somali Pirate Takedown: The Real Story TV - Dan Snow TV - Terry Pratchett - Benjamin Franklin - Robert Louis Stevenson - Karl Pilkington - Wilbur Smith - Friedrich Nietzsche - Mark Twain - In Search of History: The Pirates’ Lost City TV - The Curse of Oak Island TV - Captive 2016 - Captain Phillips 2013 - Secret Wars Uncovered TV -  

 

 

129,421.  A ghost ship is discovered adrift on the Caribbean.  Another mystery for the men who patrol those waters of dreadful fascination: the infamous Bermuda Triangle … Investigators think they have an answer … a theory that is cautiously accepted by the coastguards … a bizarre anachronism: the plundering buccaneer.  (Bermuda Triangle & Pirate)  In Search of s3e10 … Bermuda Triangle Pirates, 1978

 

 

129,427.  Beneath a strange old oak tree the search began: In 1795 three boys found a deep pit built a century before.  They were convinced it held something of immense value.  The clues uncovered were so tantalising that men have been digging ever since.  Today, two centuries later, the search continues for the buried treasure of Oak Island.  (Oak Island & Pirate)  In Search of s3e16 … The Money Pit Mystery, 1979

 

129,428.  One of the world’s most elaborate treasure hunts is presently underway on Oak Island off the east coast of Canada.  In the 1600s the waters of Nova Scotia were a haven for pirates eluding British and Spanish pursuit.  (Oak Island & Pirate)  ibid.

 

129,429.  As early as 1720 strange lights have been seen at night on the island’s coast.  Two fishermen who went out to investigate vanished.  (Oak Island & Pirate)  ibid.

 

 

118,603.  For years treasure hunters believed the islands off the coast of Nova Scotia were a haven for Spanish and Portuguese pirates.  (Oak Island & Pirate)  The Curse of Oak Island s2e1: Once In Forever In

 

 

4,375.  1579: a new age of piracy … Francis Drake.  (Humanity & England & Pirate)  Mankind: The Story of All of Us VIII: Treasure

 

4,376.  Enough to pay off England’s entire national debt and fund its government for a year.  (Humanity & England & Pirate)  ibid.

 

 

30,428.  In this raid, [Sir Francis] Drake seized eighty pound in weight of gold.  And more than twenty-six tons in silver bars ... It’s one of the biggest heists in history.  (Great Britain & England & Gangs: UK & Pirate)  The British III: Revolution

 

 

31,244.  This was piracy with a twist ... Privateering.  (England & Great Britain & British Empire & Pirate)  Jeremy Paxman, Empire IV: Making a Fortune, BBC 2012

 

 

67,288.  Pirates – most of whom were quietly under rob, pillage and plunder contracts to the English government in return for 50%.  (Civilisation & Pirate & Contract)  James Burke, Connections II: Deja Vu s2e10, BBC 1994   

 

 

72,561.  Holy Long John Silver!  A pirate periscope!  (Fantasy & Pirate)  Batman 1966 starring Adam West & Burt Ward & Lee Meriwether & Cesar Romero & Burgess Meredith & Frank Gorshin & Alan Napier & Neil Hamilton & Stafford Repp & Madge Blake & Reginard Denny & Milton Frome & Gil Perkins & Dick Crockett et al, director Leslie H Martinson

 

72,564.  It’s five dehydrated pirates rehydrated!  (Fantasy & Pirate)  ibid.

 

 

78,274.  Drake was England’s most brazen pirate.  (England & Navy & Pirate & Spain)  Dan Snow, Armada: 12 Days to Save England, BBC 2015

 

 

85,100.  Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats.  H L Mencken, US editor, 1880-1956

 

 

85,101.  It is, it is a glorious thing

To be a Pirate King.  W S Gilbert, The Pirates of Penzance 1879

 

 

85,102.  Come gather round, mates while I sing this strange tale,

T’was a bright winter day when we siddled the sail,

And captured a treasure of fine silver plate

And five-hundred Spanish pieces of eight.

 

Oh the ocean is wide and the ocean is cold,

And they say there’s a black curse upon pirate gold.  The Buccaneers 1957 starring Sid James, Sid’s pirate song

 

 

85,103.  Now I am the richest person in the world.  Yellowbeard 1983 starring Peter Cook & Peter Boyle & Graham Chapman & Cheech & Chong & Marty Feldman & Martin Hewitt & James Mason & John Cleese & Kenneth Mars & Spike Milligan & Nigel Planer & Susannah York & Beryl Reid et al, director Mel Damski, opening scene

 

85,104.  The pirate Yellowbeard captured many other Galleons, killing over 500 men in cold blood.   He would tear the captains’ hearts out and swallow them whole.  Often forcing his victims to eat their own lips, he was caught and imprisoned for tax evasion.  But despite years of rehabilitation and torture he refused to divulge the whereabouts of his treasure.  ibid.  caption

 

85,105.  Chapman: They broke their solemn word.

 

Feldman: That’s governments for you.  ibid.

 

85,106.  Where’s my pirating outfit?  ibid.  Yellowbeard to bird

 

 

85,107.  He [William Kidd] is one of the most legendary pirates in history.  Tales of his cunning and riches have spread across the centuries since his trial and execution in 1701.  But some believe his trial was unjust, and he was the fall guy for the chain of command that leads all the way up to the King of England.  Mystery Files: Captain Kidd 

 

85,108.  William Kidd has gone down in history as a ruthless buccaneer.  But in 1695 he is in fact a reputable and experienced sea captain based in New York, at this time part of the English empire.

 

85,109.  Privateers are licensed by the State to capture and attack enemy ships.  ibid.

 

85,110.  On his return to America he is arrested and sent to trial in London.  ibid.

 

85,111.   The issue is whether he kept within the terms of his privateer’s licence.  ibid.

 

85,112.  Kidd claims that at the time he thought the ship [Quedagh Merchant] was French.  And he has the paperwork to prove it.  ibid.

 

85,113.  The existence of the passes was a matter of debate until 1910 ... They had been simply or mysteriously misfiled.  ibid.

 

85,114.  Kidd should have been exonerated of these two piracy charges.  The authorities should have known of their existence.  ibid.   

 

85,115.  The Quedagh Merchant is brokered by the East India Company.  ibid.

 

85,116.  The East India Company must see Kidd convicted.  And it turns out they are not the only ones needing blood.  ibid.

 

85,117.  One more person would also take a cut of the spoils – King William of England.  This investment deal was originally made in secret, but with Kidd’s arrest word got out.  ibid.

 

85,118.  The claim of an unfair trial has long been debated ... A scapegoat to save the skins of more powerful men.  ibid.

 

 

85,119.  Captain Kidd was one of the leading citizens in New York City.  A strong clever intelligent man and a successful captain.  Richard Zacks, author The Pirate Hunter

 

 

85,120.  Everyone wanted him to be a pirate.  Richard Zacks

 

 

85,121.  He is absolutely flabbergasted to be charged with murder.  Richard Zacks

 

 

85,122.  I find Captain Kidd’s verdict appalling.  I think he was at worst guilty of manslaughter.  Richard Zacks

 

 

85,123.  Privateering was business, a business opportunity ... This was licensed private enterprise warfare.  Professor Andrew Lambert, Kings College London

 

 

85,124.  He [Kidd] is completely unaware that opinion has turned against him.  Tom Wareham, Museum of London Docklands

 

 

85,125.  Dusk Easter Sunday 2009: snipers from the US Navy Special Forces take aim at three targets ... an end to a ninety-six hour standoff.  Somali Pirate Takedown: The Real Story, Discovery 2014

 

85,126.  Since January 2008 more than a hundred and fifty vessels have been hijacked and up to a hundred and fifty million dollars in ransom has been paid.  ibid.

 

85,127.  Their captain is gone, a prisoner on board the lifeboat, heading towards Somalia ... After six hours they fall behind.  ibid.

 

85,128.  The Bainbridge puts an end to the seventeen hour ordeal.  ibid.

 

 

78,274.  Drake was England’s most brazen pirate.  (England & Navy & Pirate)  Dan Snow, Armada: 12 Days to Save England, BBC 2015

 

 

85,137.  Some pirates achieved immortality by great deeds of cruelty or derring-do.  Some achieved immortality by amassing great wealth.  But the captain had long ago decided that he would, on the whole, prefer to achieve immortality by not dying.  Terry Pratchett, The Colour of Magic

 

 

85,138.  It’s better to swim in the sea below

Than to swing in the air and feed the crow,

Says jolly Ned Teach of Bristol.  Benjamin Franklin  

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