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<U>
Universe (I)
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  UFO & UFOs (I)  ·  UFO & UFOs (II)  ·  UFOs Top Ten  ·  UFOs UK & Ireland  ·  UFOs US  ·  UFOs World  ·  Uganda & Ugandans  ·  Ukraine & Ukrainians  ·  Unborn  ·  Under Ground & Underground  ·  Underground Bases  ·  Underground Trains & Stations  ·  Understand & Understanding  ·  Unemployment & Unemployed  ·  Unhappy  ·  Unicorn  ·  Uniform  ·  Unite & Unity  ·  United Arab Emirates  ·  United Kingdom  ·  United Nations  ·  United States of America  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (I)  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (II)  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (III)  ·  United States of America Early – 1899 (I)  ·  United States of America Early – 1899 (II)  ·  Universe (I)  ·  Universe (II)  ·  Universe (III)  ·  University  ·  Uranium  ·  Uranus  ·  Urim & Thummim  ·  Urine  ·  Usury & Usurer  ·  Utah  ·  Utopia  ·  Uzbekistan  

★ Universe (I)

Universe (I): see Universe II & Big Bang & Cosmos & Space & Physics & Astrophysics & Quantum Theory & Multiverse & Parallel Universe & Theory of Everything & Stars & Heaven & Galaxies & M Theory & Cosmology & Hologram & Black Hole & Brown Dwarf & Red Dwarf & White Dwarf & Moons & Solar System & Milky Way & Pulsars & Quasars & Anthropic Principle & White Hole & Quantum Physics & Gravity & Simulation Theory

Monty Python 1983 - Red Dwarf TV - Peter Cook - Carl Sagan TV - Richard Dawkins TV - Stephen Hawking TV - George Carlin - Robert G Ingersoll - Arthur C Clarke - Albert Einstein - C S Lewis - Ernest Rutherford - Richard Feynman - Dara O'Briain’s Science Club TV - Douglas Adams TV - Philip K Dick - Edwin Hubble - J B S Haldane - Galileo Galilei - David Wong - V S Ramachandran - Sam Harris - Christopher Hitchens - Steven Weinberg & Jonathan Miller & The Atheism Tapes TV - Leonard Susskind - John Muir - Fred Hoyle - Alfred North Whitehead - Chuang-Tzu - Martin Rees - Thomas Hobbes - Max Tegmark - Martin Amis -  Michio Kaku TV - Lawrence Krauss - Mike Disney - Saul Perlmutter - George Gamow - Neil deGrasse Tyson TV - David Deutsche - Paul Davies - Christiaan Huygens - David Hume - John H Holmes - Jean de la Fontaine - Carl Becker - Brendon Carter - Frank Tipler - Dennis Sciama - Vera Rubin - Carlos Frenk - BBC Horizon - Jim Al-Khalili TV - Kevin Fong TV - 

 

 

43.  Just remember that you’re standing on a planet that’s revolving, and revolving at nine hundred miles an hour.  It’s orbiting at ninety miles a second, so it’s reckoned, the sun that is the source of all our power.  The sun and you and me and all the stars that we can see are moving at a million miles a day.  In an outer spiral arm at forty thousand miles an hour in a galaxy we call the Milky Way.

 

Our galaxy itself contains a hundred billion stars.  It’s a hundred thousand light years side to side.  It bulges in the middle sixteen thousand light years thick.  And out by us it’s just three thousand light years wide.  We’re thirty thousand light years from galactic central point.  We got round every two hundred million years.  And our galaxy is only one of millions of billions in this amazing and expanding universe.  The universe itself keeps expanding and expanding in all the directions it can whiz.  As fast as it can go the speed of light you know twelve million miles a minutes and that’s the fastest speed there is.  So remember when you’re feeling very small and insecure how amazing and unlikely is your birth.  And pray that there’s intelligent life somewhere up in space.  ’Cause there’s bugger all down here on Earth.  (God & Earth & Galaxy & Space & Universe & Meaning of Life & Cosmology & Astronomy)  Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life 1983, song & dance routine

 

 

23,798.  Additional: as the days go by we face the increasing inevitability that we are alone in a godless uninhabited hostile and meaningless universe.  Still, you’ve got to laugh, haven’t you.  (Science Fiction & Life & Life's Like That & Universe)  Red Dwarf II: Kryten s2e1

 

 

43,342.  I've been reading a very interesting book recently.  It’s called The Universe and All That Surrounds It by T J Bleendreeble.  It’s an extremely good book about it.  It's about seventy pages long, so it's fairly comprehensive about the whole thing and it's fairly interesting.  Bleendreeble specialises in the universe.  He doesn't branch out much beyond that.  But he’s quite interested in this limited field.  (Comedy & Universe)  Peter Cook as E L Wisty, Food for Thought 1964

 

 

60.  How is it that any major religion has looked at science and concluded, ‘This is better than we thought’?  The universe is much bigger than our prophets said, grander, more subtle, more elegant.  ‘No, no, no!’ they say, ‘My God is a little god and I want him to stay that way.’  A religion old or new that stressed the magnificence of the universe as revealed by modern science might be able to draw forth reserves of reverence and awe hardly tapped by the conventional faiths.  (God & Religion & Universe & Science)  Professor Carl Sagan

 

 

61.  The idea that God is an oversized white male with a flowing beard who sits in the sky and tallies the fall of every sparrow is ludicrous.  But if by God one means the set of physical laws that govern the universe, then clearly there is such a God.  This God is emotionally unsatisfying ... it does not make much sense to pray to the law of gravity.  (God & Universe)  Professor Carl Sagan

 

 

64.  In this way, science has emasculated the old gods.  It has stripped them of their powers and has instead allotted them to a source that is wholly neutral, one that is indifferent to the affairs of men, one scientists refer to as the forces of nature.


Now I can certainly understand why humans would desire to believe in a God, in a force that cares about us, that treats us as its favoured creatures.  Believing in a God provides us with a sense of purpose, with a sense that we are immortal.  (God & Universe & Nature)  Professor Carl Sagan

 

 

912.  For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring.  (Truth & Delusion & Universe & God)  Carl Sagan, The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

 

 

2,468.  A way of sceptically interrogating the universe with a fine understanding of human fallibility.  If we are not able to ask sceptical questions, to interrogate those who tell us that something is true, to be sceptical of those in authority, then we’re up for grabs for the next charlatan, political or religious, who comes ambling along.  (Science & Sceptics & Universe)  Carl Sagan, interview Charlie Rose 27th May 1996

 

2,475.  Who is more humble?  The scientist who looks at the universe with an open mind and accepts whatever it has to teach us, or somebody who says everything in this book must be considered the literal truth and never mind the fallibility of all the human beings involved?  (Science & Humble & Universe & Bible & Religion)  ibid.

 

 

2,615.  If you wish to make an apple-pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.  (Science & Universe & Apple & Create)  Carl Sagan, Cosmos

 

2,697.  The size and age of the Cosmos are beyond ordinary human understanding.  Lost somewhere between immensity and eternity is our tiny planetary home.  In a cosmic perspective, most human concerns seem insignificant, even petty.  And yet our species is young and curious and brave and shows much promise.  In the last few millennia we have made the most astonishing and unexpected discoveries about the Cosmos and our place within it, explorations that are exhilarating to consider.  They remind us that humans have evolved to wonder, that understanding is a joy, that knowledge is prerequisite to survival.  I believe our future depends on how well we know this Cosmos in which we float like a mote of dust in the morning sky.  (Universe & Cosmology)  ibid.

 

2,983.  The Cosmos is all that is or was or ever will be.  Our feeblest contemplations of the Cosmos stir us – there is a tingling in the spine, a catch in the voice, a faint sensation, as if a distant memory, of falling from a height.  We know we are approaching the greatest of mysteries.  (Universe & Cosmology)  ibid.

 

3,273.  Ten or twenty billion years ago, something happened – the Big Bang, the event that began our universe.  Why it happened is the greatest mystery we know.  That it happened is reasonably clear.  All the matter and energy now in the universe was concentrated at extremely high density – a kind of cosmic egg, reminiscent of the creation myths of many cultures – perhaps into a mathematical point with no dimensions at all.  It was not that all the matter and energy were squeezed into a minor corner of the present universe; rather, the universe, matter and energy and the space they fill, occupied a very small volume.  There was not much room for events to happen in.

 

... The radiation of the cosmic fireball, which, then is now, filled the universe, moved through the spectrum – from gamma rays to X-rays to ultraviolet light; through the rainbow colors of the visible spectrum; into the infrared and radio regions.  The remnants of that fireball, the cosmic background radiation, emanating from all parts of the sky can be detected by radio telescopes today.  In the early universe, space was brilliantly illuminated.  As time passed, the fabric of space continued to expand, the radiation cooled and, in ordinary visible light, for the first time space became dark, as it is today.  (Big Bang & Universe)  ibid.  pp200-201

 

 

2,704.  The universe is a pretty big space.  It’s bigger than anything anyone has ever dreamed of before.  So, if it’s just us, seems like an awful waste of space, right?  (Universe & Space & Anthropic Principle)  Professor Carl Sagan

 

 

2,705.  They found that the galaxies were flying away from one another.  To the entire astonishment of everyone the universe was expanding.  We had begun to plumb the true depths of Time and Space.  (Universe & Cosmology & Space)  Professor Carl Sagan & Ann Druyan, Cosmos: The Shores of the Cosmic Ocean, 1979

 

2,706.  The cosmos is all there is, or ever was or ever will be.  Our contemplations of the cosmos stir us.  (Universe & Cosmology)  ibid.

 

2,707.  We are made of star stuff.  We are a way for the cosmos to know itself.  (Universe & Cosmology & Stars)  ibid.

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