Call us:
0-9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
  UFO & UFOs (I)  ·  UFO & UFOs (II)  ·  UFOs Top Ten  ·  UFOs UK & Ireland  ·  UFOs US  ·  UFOs World  ·  Uganda & Ugandans  ·  Ukraine & Ukrainians  ·  Unborn  ·  Under Ground & Underground  ·  Underground Bases  ·  Underground Trains & Stations  ·  Understand & Understanding  ·  Unemployment & Unemployed  ·  Unhappy  ·  Unicorn  ·  Uniform  ·  Unite & Unity  ·  United Arab Emirates  ·  United Kingdom  ·  United Nations  ·  United States of America  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (I)  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (II)  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (III)  ·  United States of America Early – 1899 (I)  ·  United States of America Early – 1899 (II)  ·  Universe (I)  ·  Universe (II)  ·  Universe (III)  ·  University  ·  Uranium  ·  Uranus  ·  Urim & Thummim  ·  Urine  ·  Usury & Usurer  ·  Utah  ·  Utopia  ·  Uzbekistan  
<U>
Universe (III)
U
  UFO & UFOs (I)  ·  UFO & UFOs (II)  ·  UFOs Top Ten  ·  UFOs UK & Ireland  ·  UFOs US  ·  UFOs World  ·  Uganda & Ugandans  ·  Ukraine & Ukrainians  ·  Unborn  ·  Under Ground & Underground  ·  Underground Bases  ·  Underground Trains & Stations  ·  Understand & Understanding  ·  Unemployment & Unemployed  ·  Unhappy  ·  Unicorn  ·  Uniform  ·  Unite & Unity  ·  United Arab Emirates  ·  United Kingdom  ·  United Nations  ·  United States of America  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (I)  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (II)  ·  United States of America 1900 – Date (III)  ·  United States of America Early – 1899 (I)  ·  United States of America Early – 1899 (II)  ·  Universe (I)  ·  Universe (II)  ·  Universe (III)  ·  University  ·  Uranium  ·  Uranus  ·  Urim & Thummim  ·  Urine  ·  Usury & Usurer  ·  Utah  ·  Utopia  ·  Uzbekistan  

★ Universe (III)

Universe (III): see Universe I II & Big Bang & Cosmos & Space & Physics & Astrophysics & Quantum Theory & Multiverse & Parallel Universe & Theory of Everything & Stars & Heaven & Galaxies & M Theory & Cosmology & Hologram & Black Hole & Brown Dwarf & Red Dwarf & White Dwarf & Moons & Solar System & Milky Way & Pulsars & Quasars & Anthropic Principle & White Hole & Quantum Physics & Gravity

Big Bang (documentary) TV - Beyond the Big Bang TV - David Spergel - Neil Turok - William Bowen Bonner - Michael Strauss - How The Universe Works TV - Gene Kranz - Mankind: The Story of All of Us TV - Jacob Bronowski TV - Bertrand Russell - Rebel Without a Cause 1955 - The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy 2005 - Star Trek: The Next Generation TV - Star Trek: Deep Space Nine TV - Star Trek: Voyager TV - Nikola Tesla - Arthur Eddington - Terry Pratchett - 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God TV - Another 50 Renowned Academics Speaking About God TV - Roger Penrose - James Woods TV - Jack Kerouac - Brian Greene TV - Unravelling the Cosmos TV - Secrets of the Universe: Great Scientists in Their Own Words TV - Strip the Cosmos TV - Joseph Smith’s Pearl of Great Price - Red Dwarf TV - Parallel Universes TV - Eurekalert online - Ancient Aliens TV - Extreme Universe TV - Hawking 2004 -        

 

 

3,228.  What is the Universe made of? ...  In the beginning there was nothing.  No matter.  No energy.  Not even empty space.  Because space itself didn’t exist.  No Time passed because there was no such thing as Time.  From nowhere appeared a fireball smaller than an atom ten trillion trillion times hotter than the core of the sun ... Time began.  In one second the blueprint for the entire cosmos was written.  How it happened is the biggest mystery of all.  (Big Bang & Universe)  Big Bang  

 

3,229.  Looking back to the instant of creation is a relatively new idea.  The Big Bang theory is widely accepted.  But the concept is less than a century old.  But all this changed in 1929.  At California’s Mount Wilson Observatory Edwin Hubble studied the light from galaxies.  He observed that the farther away the galaxy, the longer the wave-lengths of light it emits ... If a galaxy is moving away from us, its light-waves stretch, becoming longer and redder.  It’s called red-shifting ... Nearly all galaxies are receding from us at a million miles an hour ... The universe is expanding outward from a single point ...  Out of the fireball, the four fundamental forces of nature formed.  These forces underpin everything around us.  Gravity is the reason stars and planets formed ... Electro-magnetism lights our cities, runs our phones and connects our computers.  And the two nuclear forces, strong and weak, bind the particles that make up our bodies and power the furnace of our sun ... Without them the universe would be a featureless fog of radiation ... How was mass developed in the first second of the Big Bang?   (Big Bang & Universe & Galaxy & Gravity & Magnetism & Electricity & Nuclear)  ibid.

 

 

3,233.  So it was ironic that an early champion of an objective scientific theory of the origin of the universe was an ordained Catholic Priest.  And what a strange twist that his science-based solution was to appear so religious.  That the universe didn’t always exist.  But there was once an ‘In the beginning’.  Belgian Father George Le Maitre argued that the universe was born ... Lemaitre said the universe isn’t static but is actually expanding ... If the universe was expanding, Lemaitre reasoned, it was smaller yesterday than it is today, therefore it must have once been unimaginably small.  Lemaitre believed that the universe began with what he dubbed as a primeval atom, an infinitely dense cosmic egg that had at some time in the past exploded.  (Big Bang & Universe & Cosmology)  Beyond the Big Bang

 

 

3,235.  The Big Bang theory is not really a theory of how the universe began, it’s really a theory of how the universe evolved.  (Big Bang & Universe)  Professor David Spergel

 

 

3,260.  In our picture, there was a universe before the Big Bang, very much like our universe today: a low density of matter and some stuff called dark energy.  If you postulate a universe like this, but the dark energy within is actually unstable, then the decay of this dark energy drives the two branes together.  These two branes clash and then, having filled with radiation, separate and expand to form galaxies and stars.

 

Then the dark energy takes over again.  It’s the energy of attraction between the two branes: It pulls them back together.  You have bang followed by bang followed by bang.  You have no beginning of time.  It’s always been there.  (Big Bang & Matter & Dark Energy & Universe & String Theory & M Theory)  Neil Turok 

 

 

3,261.  It may be that we live in an endless universe, both in space and in time.  And there’ve been Bangs in the past, and there will be Bangs in the future.  (Big Bang & Universe)  Neil Turok  

 

 

3,262.  My experience in science has always been that the future always exceeds what we believe is possible.  I suspect that we will explore the universe.  (Universe & Science)  Neil Turok

 

 

3,263.  If the universe sprung into existence and then expanded exponentially, you get gravitational waves traveling through space-time.  These would fill the universe, a pattern of echoes of the inflation itself.  (Big Bang & Universe & Gravity)  Neil Turok

 

 

3,282.  I think that physics is the most important – indeed the only – means we have of finding out the origins and fundamentals of our universe, and this is what interests me most about it.  I believe that as science advances religion necessarily recedes, and this is a process I wish to encourage, because I consider that, on the whole, the influence of religion is malign.  (Science & Physics & Universe & Religion)  William Bowen Bonner 

 

 

3,387.  So galaxies must have formed out of that early universe.  (Galaxy & Universe)  Professor Michael Strauss

 

 

3,236.  Billions and billions of galaxies.  The universe is so vast we can’t even imagine what those numbers mean.  But fourteen billion years ago none of it existed.  Until the Big Bang.  (Big Bang & Universe)  How The Universe Works s1e1: The Big Bang, Discovery 2010

 

3,237.  What came before the Big Bang?  (Big Bang & Universe)  ibid.

 

3,238.  Scientists think it took less than a millionth of a millionth of a millionth of a millionth of a second for the universe to expand from the size of an atom to a tennis ball ... That means it was expanding faster than the speed of light.  It’s called Plank Time.  (Big Bang & Universe)  ibid.  

 

 

3,351.  When the Earth crushes down to just five centimetres across that’s the density of a black hole.  It would be about the size of a golf ball, yet weigh the same as the Earth with the same amount of gravity.  (Black Hole & Gravity & Universe)  How the Universe Works s1e2: Black Holes

 

3,352.  When massive stars ten times heavier than our sun die gravity crushes them creating a huge explosion.  A supernova.  But some stars are even bigger than that.  These super-massive stars weigh one hundred times more than our sun, and have one hundred times our gravity.  When one of these stars dies it sets off the biggest explosion in the universe: a hyper-nova.  And this is the birth of a black hole.  (Black Hole & Gravity & Star & Supernova & Universe)  ibid.  

 

3,353.  Black holes are born from dying stars.  And most are small.  And thirty kilometres across.  But now scientists have discovered some black holes are much bigger: they’re called super-massive black holes.  They’re the same size as our entire solar system.  And one of these monsters lies at the heart of our own galaxy.  (Black Hole & Gravity & Star & Supernova & Galaxy & Universe)  ibid.  

     

3,354.  Everything in our galaxy including our own solar system orbits around a super-massive black hole.  But the milky way is not the only galaxy with a black hole at its centre.  There are super-massive black holes at the heart of most galaxies in the universe.  The Andromeda Galaxy is our closest neighbour.  It circles a super-massive black hole weighing one hundred and forty times more than our sun.  (Black Hole & Supernova & Galaxy & Universe)  ibid.  

 

3,355.  Quasars blast away huge quantities of gas from the surrounding galaxy.  The equivalent of ten Earths every minute.  Black holes suck gas in; quasars blow it out.  But eventually there’s no gas left to make stars.  And the galaxy stops growing.  With no gas left to feed on, the quasar jets shrink and die.  What’s left is a super-massive black hole at the centre of the galaxy with a lot of infant stars.  Just like our Milky Way when it was young.  (Black Hole & Quasar & Galaxy & Milky Way & Universe)  ibid.  

 

3,356.  What lies at the heart of a black hole?  Some scientists believe we could use black holes as a portal with potential to travel across the universe.  (Black Hole & Time & Universe)  ibid.  

 

3,357.  Black holes might even be gateways to other universes.  On the other side of a black hole there could even be a big bang.  (Black Hole & White Hole & Wormhole & Big Bang & Universe)  ibid.  

 

 

3,395.  We live in a galaxy called the Milky Way.  An empire with hundreds of billions of stars.  There are two hundred billion galaxies in the known universe.  Each one unique, enormous and dynamic.  (Galaxy & Milk Way & Star & Universe)  How the Universe Works s1e3: Galaxies, Discovery 2010

 

3,396.  The stars in a galaxy are born in clouds of dust and gas called nebulas.  (Galaxy & Milky Way & Star & Nebula & Universe)  ibid.

 

3,397.  Our galaxy contains many billions of stars.  And around many of them are systems of planets and moons.  But for a long time we didn’t know much about galaxies.  Just a century ago we thought the Milky Way was all there was.  Scientists called it our island universe.  For them no other galaxies existed.  Then in 1924 astronomer Edwin Hubble changed that thinking.  (Galaxy & Milky Way & Star & Universe)  ibid.

 

3,398.  Galaxies are big.  Really really big.  (Galaxy & Universe)  ibid.

 

3,399.  Andromeda our nearest galactic neighbour is over two-hundred thousand light years across.  Twice the size of our galaxy.  (Galaxy & Milky Way & Universe)  ibid.  

1