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★ Artists, Meet the (III)

Artists, Meet the (III): see Artists, Meet the I & Artists, Meet the II Art I & Art II & Art Nouveau & Painting & Picture & Sculpture & Museum & Hobby & Design & Arts & Beauty & Aesthetics & Drawing & Fake & Forgery & Genuine & Geometry & Nazi & Picture & Rival & Renaissance & Snobbery & Talent & Arts & Crafts

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[8.6]  RACHEL WHITEREAD:  Tim Marlow TV - Tate online - David Cohen - The Independent – South Bank Show TV - Imagine … Rachel Whiteread: Ghosts in the Room TV -

 

11,665.  You have to absolutely acknowledge the work of Rachel Whiteread, whose now destroyed concrete casts of an entire house in East London in 1993 remains a haunting memory.  (Artist & Sculpture & Art)  Tim Marlow on ... British Sculpture 2011

 

 

11,666.  English sculptor, draughtsman and printmaker.  She studied painting at Brighton Polytechnic (1982–5) and sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art (1985–7).  Employing traditional casting methods and materials that are commonly used in the preparation of sculptures rather than for the finished object, such as plaster, rubber and resin, she makes sculptures of the spaces in, under and on everyday objects.  Her art operates on many levels: it captures and gives materiality to the sometimes unfamiliar spaces of familiar life (bath, sink, mattress or chair), transforming the domestic into the public; it fossilises everyday objects in the absence of human usage; and it allows those objects to stand anthropomorphically for human beings themselves.

 

Whiteread’s choice of subject-matter reflects an awareness of the intrinsically human-scaled design of the objects with which we surround ourselves and exploits the severing of this connection, by removal of the object's function, to express absence and loss.  Her early work allowed autobiographical elements.  Later works move towards the expression of a universal human position, and their titles become correspondingly more prosaic.  (Artist & Sculpture)  Tate online

 

 

11,667.  Unquestionably the most resolved, substantial and satisfying use so far of the single idea that defines her career.  (Artist & Sculpture)  David Cohen, of Sensation exhibition of 1997 and Ghost 1990

 

 

11,668.  A strange and fantastical object which also amounts to one of the most extraordinary and imaginative sculptures created by an English artist this century.  (Artist & Sculpture)  The Independent, of House 1993

 

 

98,327.  In 2001 the British sculpture Rachel Whiteread, then aged 38, made her name across the world with the body of work that portrayed the influence of American minimalism and British post-war sculpture.  (Artist & Sculpture)  Rachel Whiteread, South Bank Show *****

 

98,328.  In 1990 Rachel Whiteread made a huge new sculpture – Ghost – which was the caste in plaster of the inside of a whole north London bedsit.  (Artist & Sculpture)  ibid.

 

98,329.  House:  ‘I think it had something to do with the political climate of the time.’  (Artist & Sculpture)  ibid.  

 

98,330.  ‘It was demolished on the orders of a London council.’  (Artist & Sculpture)  ibid.  BBC News January 1994 

 

98,331.  Holocaust Memorial Sculpture: ‘This is a warning to future generations … This monument isn’t beautiful, nor should it be – It has to hurt.’  (Artist & Sculpture & Hurt)  ibid.  Simon Wiesenthal, opening ceremony

 

 

113,502.  ‘The sculptor of a house that won this year’s Turner Art Prize has watched her work being demolished.’  (Artist & Sculpture)  Imagine … Rachel Whiteread: Ghosts in the Room, BBC 2017, BBC news

 

113,503.  The first woman to win the Turner Prize.  This perceptive understated artist is celebrated across the world.  (Artist & Sculpture)  ibid.

 

113,504.  Untitled (One Hundred Spaces) 1995 … Photographic Studies 1988 … Closet 1988 … Shallow Breath 1988 … Ghost 1990 … House 1993 … Water Tower 1998 … Untitled (Stairs) 2001 … Line Up 2007-8 …    (Artist & Sculpture)  ibid.      

 

113,505.  Rachel Whiteread was born in Essex in 1963, the youngest of three girls.  (Artist & Sculpture)  ibid.

 

113,506.  It had been five years in the making but Rachel Whiteread’s holocaust memorial had finally won over its detractors.  (Artist & Sculpture)  ibid.

 

 

[8.6]  WILLEM DE KOONING:  Matthew Collings TV - Willem de Kooning - Stevens & Swan -

 

110,527.  Why a painting by Willem de Kooning looks like a de Kooning is because of the way it’s done: that fantastically battered impacted look is achieved by constantly working at it.  (Civilisation & Art & Artist)  Matthew Collings, This is Civilisation IV: Uncertainty, BBC 2007

 

 

110,528.  Art never seems to make me peaceful or pure.  I always seem to be wrapped in the melodrama of vulgarity.  I do not think … of art as a situation of comfort.  Willem de Kooning

 

 

110,529.  In the days before de Kooning establishing himself formally as a painter, Willem de Kooning had a variety of experiences that helped him to define himself.  His influences by friends and the times were surprising.  Of the singular influences was his relationship to music.  In the early thirties … de Kooning made one astonishing and symbolic purchase.  Just when the Depression was destroying the livelihood of millions of people, including that of many artists, de Kooning bought the best and most expensive record player money could buy – a miraculous machine that could summon ‘God and all those angels up there’.  Called a Capehart high-fidelity system, it was one of the first to change records automatically.  It cost then the prodigious sum of $700, more than half of de Kooning’s annual salary at A S Beck; he got an advance to pay for it.  With this purchase, de Kooning announced that he would not use this money to make himself conventionally respectable, even during the hard, early years of the Depression.  He did not buy a house or a car, get married, have a baby, or stash away money against hard times. Instead, he professed himself sublimely irresponsible, a man nourished by music rather than mundane realities.  And yet, it was still music rather than art that prompted his expansive gesture, for he could not yet find a comparable fluency, vitality, or extravagance in art.  M Stevens & A Swan, De Kooning: An American Master, 2004

 

 

[8.6]  PAUL NASH:  Jon Snow TV - James Fox TV - This Green and Pleasant Land TV - Princess Margaret - Paul Nash - Nashclumps online -  

 

11,342.  Nash found himself in the thick of the trenches on the Western front.  Although the official war artists were potentially part of a propaganda machine sending back bulletins from the front line, they were given complete freedom to paint any aspect of war with no restrictions.  Even so, Nash had reservations about being part of this machine.  Jon Snow, The Genius of British Art: War

    

11,343.  Nash’s pictures brilliantly capture war’s ravages, not just on man but on nature.  ibid.

 

 

11,344.  Paul Nash.  A man whose intense emotional bond with nature would make him the greatest war painter of the twentieth century.  Dr James Fox, British Masters, BBC 2011

 

 

11,345.  For Nash this wasn’t just a corn-field; this was England: beautiful, bountiful England.  The England he had fought so hard to protect.  Dr James Fox, British Masters II: In Search of England

 

11,346.  Paul Nash had made his name as one of the most powerful painters of the First World War.  But his sympathies with surrealist ideas went back much further.  He was born into an affluent middle-class family.  ibid.

 

11,347.  On his journeys around England Nash painted a singular series of landscapes.  ibid.

 

 

11,348.  Another unlikely teenage fan of the Pre-Raphaelites was Paul Nash.  A Londoner from a comfortable middle-class family the First World War had brought an abrupt end to his studies.  This Green and Pleasant Land: The Story of British Landscape Painting

 

11,349.  He managed to combine an enthusiasm for modernism with a love of the countryside.  (Artist & Countryside)  ibid.

 

 

11,350.  Poor mummy’s gone mad.  Look what she’s brought back.  Princess Margaret, of Queen Mother’s purchase of ‘Vernal Equinox’

 

 

11,351.  Sunset and sunrise are blasphemous.  They are mockeries to man.  It is unspeakable, godless, hopeless.  I am no longer an artist interested and curious; I am a messenger.  (Artist & World War I)  Paul Nash, letter to wife

 

 

11,352.  I am no longer an artist interested and curious, I am a messenger who will bring back word from the men who are fighting to those who want the war to go on for ever.  Feeble, inarticulate, will be my message, but it will have a bitter truth, and may it burn their lousy souls.  (Artist & World War I)  Paul Nash, letter to wife

 

11,353.  Paul Nash (1889 - 1946) was one of the finest English landscape painters of his generation.  He served as an official war artist in both World Wars.  His paintings of the trenches in the First World War were powerful evocations of destruction.

In the Second World War he was employed by the Air Ministry and created iconic works such as Totes Meer, a landscape covered by wrecked German aircraft.

 

A talented wood-engraver and book illustrator, Nash’s work embraced watercolour, oils, photography and designs for textiles and posters. He wrote extensively on art and became a distinguished critic.  Nashclumps online 

 

 

[8.6]  JOHN ATKINSON GRIMSHAW:  Howard Jacobson TV - This Green and Pleasant Land TV - James Whistler - Mail online -    

 

11,354.  The painter of urban puddles he might be, but Atkinson Grimshaw’s moonlit cities are essentially lyrical, congenial to the presence of fancifully conceived figures.  Grimshaw’s fairies are as though bred by the city of Leeds itself.  (Artist & Fairies)  Howard Jacobson, The Genius of British Art: Flesh, 2010   

 

 

11,355.  In the 1860s a painter called John Atkinson Grimshaw began to produce romantic twilight depictions of the great northern industrial cities like this scene of his native Leeds.  This Green and Pleasant Land: The Story of British Landscape Painting

 

 

11,356.  I considered myself the inventor of Nocturnes until I saw Grimmy’s moonlit pictures.  (Artist & Night)  James Whistler

 

 

11,357.  Today his oil paintings fetch up to £500,000 but a new exhibition reveals how Victorian master John Atkinson Grimshaw’s artistic ambitions left him destitute.

 

In his early twenties and with no professional training, the Yorkshireman decided ditch his job as a railway clerk to make a living from his art.

 

However his atmospheric depictions of areas including Glasgow, Liverpool, Leeds and London are now hugely sought-after.

 

Simon Toll, expert in Victorian art at Sotheby's, said: ‘Grimshaw's work is nostalgic and evocative of the period.

 

‘He is considered to be one of the best painters of moonlit scenes.’  Mail online article 19th April 2011 Sadie Whitelocks, ‘Hard times: The Victorian Artist Who Mastered the Night But was Overshadowed by Debt’

 

 

[8.6]  PIETER CORNELIS MONDRIAN:  Andrew Graham-Dixon TV - In Modrian's Studio TV - Piet Mondrian -  

 

10,259.  Piet Mondrian: Mondrian moves closer to grid-form abstraction.  (Art & Artist: Mondrian)  Andrew Graham-Dixon, The High Art of the Low Countries III: Daydreams and Nightmares

 

10,260.  Mondrian took his dreams elsewhere: New York.  (Art & Artist: Mondrian)  ibid.

  

 

11,321.  Paris December 1920 … Piet Mondrian is forty-eight years old … His studio is the heart of his creativity.  In Mondrian’s Studio, Sky Arts 2013

 

11,322.  In the summer of 1914 Mondrian returns to Holland, to the bedside of his father who was ill.  ibid.  

 

11,323.  The Dada movement occupies the high ground.  ibid.

 

11,324.  For Mondrian, art and life must be the same thing.  ibid.

 

11,325.  Mondrian arrives in New York on 3rd October 1940.  ibid.

 

11,326.  His New York period draws its inspiration from the Boogie Woogie.  ibid.

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