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Arms & Army
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★ Arms & Army

63,711.  Cleric [reading Book of Armaments]:  And Saint Attila raised the hand- grenade up on high saying, ‘Oh Lord, bless this thy hand grenade, that with it thou mayest blow up thine enemies to tiny bits, in thy mercy’ ... And the Lord spake, saying, ‘First, thou shalt take out the holy pin.  Then shalt thou count to three, no more, no less.  Three shall be the number thou shalt count, and the number of the counting shalt be three.’  Monty Python and the Holy Grail 1975 starring Graham Chapman & John Cleese & Terry Gilliam & Eric Idle & Terry Jones & Michael Palin & Neil Innes & Connie Booth & Carol Cleveland et al, directors Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones 

 

 

63,712.  Don’t stand there gawping like you’ve never seen the hand of God before.  Now, today we’re going to do marching up and down the square.  That is unless any of you have got anything better to do.  Monty Pythons The Meaning of Life 1983 starring Graham Chapman & John Cleese & Terry Gillian & Eric Idle & Terry Jones & Michael Palin & Neil Innes & Patricia Quinn et al, director Terry Jones, Sergeant-Major to soldiers

 

63,713.  Democracy and humanitarianism have always been trademarks of the British army.  ibid.  commentary

 

63,714.  Doctor:  Well let’s have a look at this one leg of yours then eh.  Yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes.  Well this is nothing to worry about.  There’s a lot of it about.  Probably a virus.  ibid.   

 

 

63,715.  Ours is composed of the scum of the earth – the mere scum of the earth.  Duke of Wellington

 

 

63,716.  Those entrusted with arms ... should be persons of some substance and stake in the country.  William Windham, speech House of Commons 22nd July 1807

 

 

63,717.  Military budget is simply an enormous pork barrel of special privilege, the privileges taking the form of windfall profits, of no-risk profits and, most importantly, of enormous outlays of capital supplied by the Pentagon to arms contractors.  (Arms & Military & Defence)  William Karp

 

 

63,718.  They took me to an MO – Medical Officer.  And he said, ‘Take your clothes off.’  I said, ‘Well shouldn’t you take me out to dinner or something first?’  (Army & Doctor)  Spike Milligan, Des O’Connor Show

 

 

63,720.  The way the pikes had clobbered the mounted knights [of the Dukes of Burgundy] changed the battle plans of every military commander in Europe.  For the next forty years the pike was it.  And the armies got bigger because they were cheaper.  And then on April 28th 1503 ... a new weapon had arrived.  It was the gun.  James Burke, Connections: Eat, Drink & Be Merry s1e8

 

63,721.  And suddenly feeding huge armies was the big new problem, and one that almost blew it for Napoleon at a little known spot in northern Italy.  ibid.

 

 

63,723.  No-one could be considered powerful unless he could afford to pay for his own army.  Crassus

 

 

63,724.  Armies are like plants, immobile, firm-rooted, nourished through long stems to the head.  We might be a vapour, blowing where we listed.  Our kingdoms lay in each man’s mind; and as we wanted nothing material to live on, so we might offer nothing material to the killing.  It seemed a regular soldier might be helpless without a target, owning only what he sat on, and subjugating only what, by order, he could poke his rifle at.  T E Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom

 

 

63,726.  The world impoverishes itself by spending a trillion dollars a year on preparations for war, and by employing perhaps half the scientists and high technologists on the planet in military endeavours.  How would we explain all this to a dispassionate extra-terrestrial observer?  What account would we give of our stewardship of the planet Earth?  (Arms & War)  Professor Carl Sagan & Ann Druyan, Cosmos: Who Speaks for Earth? 1979

 

 

63,727.  Armies do not exist for peace.  They exist only for triumphant exertion in war.  Adolf Hitler

 

 

63,728.  An army marches on its stomach.  Napoleon Bonaparte

 

 

49,076.  Who is the biggest violator of the non-proliferation treaty?  The United States of America.  We signed a pledge that we would begin to disarm and we’re not doing it; we’re expanding our nukes.  Who the hell are we going to nuke?  (Nuclear & Empire: US & Arms)  Mike Gravel, 2009 Democratic Party nominee

 

 

63,729.  On a single day last month Carlyle earned $237 million selling shares in United Defense Industries.  (Arms & Carlyle)  Los Angeles Times article 10th January 2002

 

 

100,252.  ‘Britain’s power and influence has declined since the start of the century.  The question is, Is this a trend we can reverse  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK)  Adam Curtis, The Mayfair Set I: Who Pays Wins, BBC 1999, Ernest Bevin

 

100,253.  After the War, David Stirling left and the Army and went to live in Rhodesia.  Like many returning servicemen, he found post-War Britain drab and depressed.  Stirling also believed his duty was to help maintain Britain’s empire.  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK)  ibid. 

 

100,254.  The set that Aspinall gathered round him at the Clermont [gambling club] were like Stirling disaffected right-wingers … James Goldsmith … The tycoon Tiny Rowland … Lord Lucan … Jim Slater, the take-over tycoon and asset-stripper who ran the notorious Slater-Walker.  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK)  ibid.

 

100,255.  Stirling and Avery had dinner with the foreign secretary Alec Douglas Hume at White’s Club in St James’s.  They proposed a plan: a group of ex-SAS men would mount an operation to fight the Egyptians but they would do it privately.  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK)  ibid.

 

100,256.  [Prince] Faisall was terrified Nassar would invade his county next and agreed to the British idea: the Saudis would pay for the war.  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK & Yemen & Saudi Arabia)  ibid. 

 

100,257.  The Saudis agreed to pay for the British mercenaries but also to smuggle weapons into the Yemen.  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK & Yemen & Saudi Arabia)  ibid.

 

100,258.  [Denis] Healey believed instead the British arms industry should make money for Britain.  The Americans were selling weapons around the world, and Healey wanted Britain to compete.  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK & Yemen & Saudi Arabia)  ibid.     

 

100,259.  But Britain was not very good at selling weapons, until David Stirling decided to get involved.  (Army & Great Britain & Empire UK & Yemen & Saudi Arabia)  ibid.  

 

94,265.  What was invented in the Yemen was a new private form of foreign policy for Britain, paid for by other countries’ money.  But then at the very moment when Stirling’s team seemed to be on the brink of success, an economic crisis hit Britain which threatened his whole concept.  (Yemen & Army & Empire UK & Saudi Arabia & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

100,260.  He [Khashoggi] told Lockheed the only way to win the [arms] deal was to bribe the Saudi government.  Ten years later in a Senate investigation Lockheed’s chairman admitted what had happened.  (Army & Saudi Arabia)  ibid.   

 

87,639.  In December 1965 the Saudis announced they would buy the British planes: the bribes had worked.  It was the biggest export deal in Britain’s history.  And King Faisall came on a state visit to celebrate it.  It was also the beginning of the modern arms trade with the Middle East which has grown to dominate Britain’s economy.  And from it also came a much wider commercial relationship with Saudi Arabia.  (Saudi Arabia & Export & Arms & Bribery)  ibid.

 

100,261.  ‘Should we stop sending arms to Nigeria?’  (Army & Nigeria & Empire UK & Export)  ibid.  Robin Day roundtable  

 

100,262.  Stirling … set up a secret organisation … to provide Africa and African leaders with a private army of mercenaries … They also became influential.  (Army & Africa & Empire UK)  ibid.

 

63,730.  By the early 70s [David] Stirling had become a successful businessman.  He arranged enormous arms deals, and his mercenaries kept many third-world leaders in power.  Almost single-handedly Stirling had created the foundations of Britain’s modern privatised foreign policy.  It is a hidden world of vicious guerrilla wars fought by British mercenaries, a world that occasionally surfaces in scandals like the Sandfire affair.  It all began with Stirling selling Britain’s military power to countries he approved of.  (Army & Empire UK & Export & 1970s)  ibid.  

 

100,263.  The clubs of Mayfair: he [Stirling] formed an organisation called Great Britain 75.  It was a group of military men, many of them ex-SAS.  The planned to take over the running of Britain if the strikes led to the collapse of civil order.  (Army & Coup & 1970s)  ibid.  

 

100,264.  Much of the money to fund Stirling’s operations came from his friend at the Clermont Club: James Goldsmith.  (Army & Coup & 1970s)  ibid.

 

100,265.  Denis Healey began a series of savage cuts in public expenditure.  (Army & Great Britain & 1970s)  ibid.  

 

100,266.  Stirling’s mercenaries returned home after twenty years of trying to keep Britain in power.  (Army & Great Britain)

 

 

63,730.  By the early 70s [David] Stirling had become a successful businessman.  He arranged enormous arms deals and his mercenaries kept many third-world leaders in power.  Almost single-handedly Stirling had created the foundations of Britain’s modern privatised foreign policy.  It is a hidden world of vicious guerrilla wars fought by British mercenaries, a world that occasionally surfaces in scandals like the Sandfire affair.  It all began with Stirling selling Britain’s military power to countries he approved of.  Adam Curtis, The Mayfair Set

 

87,639.  In December 1965 the Saudis announced they would buy the British planes: the bribes had worked.  It was the biggest export deal in Britain’s history.  And King Faisal came on a state visit to celebrate it.  It was also the beginning of the modern arms trade with the Middle East which has grown to dominate Britain’s economy.  And from it also came a much wider commercial relationship with Saudi Arabia.  (Saudi Arabia & Export & Arms & Bribery)  ibid.

 

 

63,731.  Throughout the 1980s billions of pounds of arms were being exported from this country to both Iran and Iraq by British companies with full knowledge of the British government in defiance of the government’s guidelines and in defiance of course of the UN.  That is a far more significant issue.  And if Scott was serious about it, he ought to interview the key businessmen who knew about the deals.  (Arms & 1980s)  Michael Meacher MP

 

 

63,748.  I never remember discussions about human rights ... The intelligence information that should have been stopping the arms trade was possibly helping it.  (Arms & Rights & Human Rights)  Robin Robison, Cabinet Office 1985-1990

 

 

63,749.  The military arms business as opposed to the sporting is based on human folly.  Which means simply two things: number one, its depths have yet to be plumbed; and number two, it will go on for ever.  Sam Cummings, arms dealer

 

 

63,750.  When Mrs Thatcher became prime minister there was a definite rallying to sort of say, Yes, you should be proud of what you’re doing; you’re exporting for the United Kingdom; you’re doing a good job, and her very public appearances, for instance at Farnborough she went to, she made it quite obvious from the moment she became prime minister that she personally thought that defence exporting was good for the United Kingdom.  Lt Col Robert Jarman, former government arms salesman

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