Call us:
0-9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
  Labor & Labour  ·  Labour Party (GB)  ·  Ladder  ·  Lake & Lake Monsters  ·  Lamb  ·  Land  ·  Language  ·  Laos  ·  Las Vegas  ·  Lass  ·  Last Words  ·  Latin  ·  Laugh & Laughter  ·  Law & Lawyer (I)  ·  Law & Lawyer (II)  ·  Laws of Science  ·  Lazy & Laziness  ·  Leader & Leadership  ·  Learn & Learning  ·  Lebanon  ·  Lecture & Lecturer  ·  Left Wing  ·  Leg  ·  Leisure  ·  Lend & Lending  ·  Leprosy  ·  Lesbian  ·  Letter  ·  Ley Lines  ·  Libel  ·  Liberal & Liberalism & Neo-Liberalism  ·  Liberia & Liberians  ·  Liberty  ·  Library  ·  Libya & Libyans  ·  Lies & Liar & Lying  ·  Life & Search For Life (I)  ·  Life & Search For Life (II)  ·  Life After Death  ·  Life's Like That (I)  ·  Life's Like That (II)  ·  Light  ·  Lightning  ·  Like  ·  Limerick  ·  Limit & Limits  ·  Lincoln, Abraham  ·  Linen  ·  Lion  ·  Listen & Listener  ·  Literature  ·  Little  ·  Liverpool  ·  Loan  ·  Local & Civil Government  ·  Loch Ness Monster  ·  Lockerbie Bombing  ·  Logic  ·  London (I)  ·  London (II)  ·  Lonely & Loneliness  ·  Look  ·  Lord  ·  Los Angeles  ·  Lose & Loss  ·  Lot (Bible)  ·  Lottery  ·  Louisiana  ·  Love & Lover  ·  Loyal & Loyalty  ·  LSD & Acid  ·  Lucifer  ·  Luck & Lucky  ·  Luke (Bible)  ·  Lunacy & Lunatic  ·  Lunar Society  ·  Lunch  ·  Lungs  ·  Lust  ·  Luxury  
<L>
Labor & Labour
L
  Labor & Labour  ·  Labour Party (GB)  ·  Ladder  ·  Lake & Lake Monsters  ·  Lamb  ·  Land  ·  Language  ·  Laos  ·  Las Vegas  ·  Lass  ·  Last Words  ·  Latin  ·  Laugh & Laughter  ·  Law & Lawyer (I)  ·  Law & Lawyer (II)  ·  Laws of Science  ·  Lazy & Laziness  ·  Leader & Leadership  ·  Learn & Learning  ·  Lebanon  ·  Lecture & Lecturer  ·  Left Wing  ·  Leg  ·  Leisure  ·  Lend & Lending  ·  Leprosy  ·  Lesbian  ·  Letter  ·  Ley Lines  ·  Libel  ·  Liberal & Liberalism & Neo-Liberalism  ·  Liberia & Liberians  ·  Liberty  ·  Library  ·  Libya & Libyans  ·  Lies & Liar & Lying  ·  Life & Search For Life (I)  ·  Life & Search For Life (II)  ·  Life After Death  ·  Life's Like That (I)  ·  Life's Like That (II)  ·  Light  ·  Lightning  ·  Like  ·  Limerick  ·  Limit & Limits  ·  Lincoln, Abraham  ·  Linen  ·  Lion  ·  Listen & Listener  ·  Literature  ·  Little  ·  Liverpool  ·  Loan  ·  Local & Civil Government  ·  Loch Ness Monster  ·  Lockerbie Bombing  ·  Logic  ·  London (I)  ·  London (II)  ·  Lonely & Loneliness  ·  Look  ·  Lord  ·  Los Angeles  ·  Lose & Loss  ·  Lot (Bible)  ·  Lottery  ·  Louisiana  ·  Love & Lover  ·  Loyal & Loyalty  ·  LSD & Acid  ·  Lucifer  ·  Luck & Lucky  ·  Luke (Bible)  ·  Lunacy & Lunatic  ·  Lunar Society  ·  Lunch  ·  Lungs  ·  Lust  ·  Luxury  

★ Labor & Labour

77,415.  All the labour of man is for his mouth, and yet the appetite is not filled.  Ecclesiastes 6:7

 

 

77,416.  The sleep of a labouring man is sweet.  (Labour & Sleep)  Ecclesiastes 7:6

 

 

77,417.  For the labourer is worth of his hire.  Luke 10:7

 

 

77,418.  I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.  I Corinthians 15:10

 

 

81,750.  The gods had condemned Sisyphus to ceaselessly rolling a rock to the top of a mountain, whence the stone would fall back of its own weight.  They had thought with some reason that there is no more dreadful punishment than futile and hopeless labour.  (Mountain & Labour)  Albert Camus

 

 

95,511.  This has created a huge market for the transfer of people, driven by the demand of Western business for cheap, untaxed labour.  (Globalisation & Labour)  Misha Glenny, McMafia

 

95,512.  To satisfy the demand, employers approach ‘gangmasters’ in their area with requests for cheap labour.  ibid.

 

95,513.  In recent years, there has been a steady downward pressure on the illegal labour market.  ibid.

 

95,669.  The snakeheads are smugglers, not traffickers.  They do not, on the whole, fix up jobs in the country of destination - they get you there and then it is up to you.  Victims of labour-trafficking are kidnapped or duped by traffickers in league with employers, who intend to enslave or coerce the migrant labourers.  (China & Gangstas & Labour & Smuggling)  ibid.

 

 

96,660.  As they sang the words of this noble chorus the Tories seemed to become inspired with lofty enthusiasm.  It is of course impossible to say for certain, but probably as they sang there arose before their exalted imagination, a vision of the Past, and looking down the long vista of years that were gone, they saw that from their childhood they had been years of poverty and joyless toil.  They saw their fathers and mothers, wearied and broken with privation and excessive labour, sinking unhonoured into the welcome oblivion of the grave.  (Work & Poverty & Past & Conservative & Labour)  Robert Tressell, The Ragged Trousered Philanthropist   

 

 

98,742.  What the laborer wanted was to work as pleasantly as possible, with rests, and above all, carelessly and heedlessly, without thinking ... All they wanted was to work merrily and carelessly, and his interests were not only remote and incomprehensible to them, but fatally opposed to their most just claims.  Leo Tolstoy, Anna Karenina

 

 

98,928.  The common law has traditionally been hostile to the collective self-organisation of workers, and it is only by means of statutory intervention, in the form of ‘immunities’ from common law liability, that a space has been created within which trade unions, in particular, may operate lawfully for the purposes of collective bargaining and activities associated with it, such as the conduct of industrial action and the regulation of particular trades and occupations.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Strike)  Simon Deakin & Gillian S Morris, Labour Law

 

98,929.  It was not until the ‘legislative settlement’ of the 1870s that legislation lifted the threat of criminal sanctions from all but violent forms of behaviour associated with industrial action ... but the process was not completed until the trade dispute formula was extended to cover tortious liability by the Trade Disputes Act 1906.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Strike)  ibid.  

 

98,930.  Judicial intervention reached that point at which trade unions were regarded as akin to public or statutory bodies whose decision-making powers were subject to judicial review on grounds of ultra vires.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Strike)  ibid.

 

98,931.  After the war, the Wages Councils Act 1945 was the occasion both for the expansion of the trade boards sectors into the service sector, and for a more general attempt to place institutional wage determination on a secure footing.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Pay & Strike)  ibid.

 

98,932.  It was only with the advent of employment protection legislation in the 1960s and 1970s that the industrial contract of employment came to assume the importance which it has in the modern law.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Strike)  ibid.

 

98,933.  The Labour government of 1964-70 took more direct powers in the area of pay restraint.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Pay & Strike)  ibid.  

 

98,934.  The Labour government of 1974-1979, in common with its immediate predecessors, failed to reconcile the tension between the traditional forms of state support for voluntary collective bargaining and increasing intervention in the economy through incomes policies.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Pay & Strike)  ibid.

 

98,935.  A number of means, direct and indirect, were used to undermine national bargaining.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Strike)  ibid.

 

98,936.  The narrowing of immunities and the ending of the blanket immunity of trade unions from liability in tort provided employers with may more strategic options than they had previous had for breaking strike resistance, and these were put to effective use in particular disputes, such as the Wapping and Messenger disputes in the newspaper printing industry.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Strike)  ibid.

 

98,937.  The capacity of the UK economy to maintain full employment has been steadily declining throughout the post-war period.  (Labour & Trade Union & Industrial Action & Employment & Strike)  ibid.

 

 

102,994.  40th anniversary of the Great GM Sit-Down Strike: ‘… faced the buckshot, faced the teargas, this armband still has the teargas on it.  The Women’s Emergency Brigade of Flint, Michigan made American history …’  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  With Banners & Babies: Story of the Women’s Emergency Brigade 1979, conference speaker

 

102,995.  We were the pioneers of the labour movement.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.  striker    

 

102,996.  The more you produced, the more likely you would keep their job.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid. 

 

102,997.  The foremens were using the girls and holding it over their heads that if they didn’t do what they wanted to do, they wouldn’t have a job.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

102,998.  That’s all we had in Flint, Michigan - churches and bars.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.  

 

102,999.  We met in a little coalshed.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

103,000.  They would have done anything to turn one against the other.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

103,001.  That’s when we decided to form the Women’s Auxiliary.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

103,002.  General Motors goons - our lives were in danger - were the actually prepared with guns.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

103,003.  First they turned the heat off on em, then they turned the water off on em.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

103,004.  The victory was won and the UAW was born.  (Activism & Strike & Industrial Action & Women & Michigan & Labour & Factory & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

 

103,005.  ‘My father … was a skilled roofer and he was a union man, and he said, If you go to work and there’s a union, join it, no matter what kind it is.  Any union is better than none, and if there isn’t one, organise one.’  (Activism & Industrial Action & Women & Labour & Solidarity)  Union Maids, 1976  

 

103,006.  This is the story of three women who were part of the rank and file labor movement during the tumultuous 1930s.  Their lives were like many other young working women.  But all three rose to the demands of their time and became militant organizers for their class.  (Activism & Industrial Action & Women & Labour & Solidarity)  ibid.  caption  

 

103,007.  ‘People took what ever little work they could get … Hoover told us that prosperity was just around the corner.’  (Activism & Industrial Action & Women & Labour & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

103,008.  ‘The whites and blacks did different kinds of work and made different kinds of pay also.’  (Activism & Industrial Action & Women & Labour & Solidarity)  ibid.  

 

103,009.  By the mid-1930s workers saw they could not make gains without the strength of a union.  But the American Federation of Labor refused to organise the growing number of unskilled workers.  The AF of L was made up of many separate trade unions.  (Activism & Industrial Action & Women & Labour & Solidarity)  ibid.  caption  

 

103,010.  ‘The most exciting meetings were those that were called at the shop gates.’  (Activism & Industrial Action & Women & Labour & Solidarity)  ibid.

 

 

109,454.  ‘I can hire one half of the working class to kill the other half.’  (Working Class & Class & Repression & United States & Solidarity & Industrial Action & Strike & Trade Union & Labour & Poverty)  Plutocracy: Political Repression in the USA I: Divide and Rule, 2015, Jay Gould, 19th century American railroad developer  

 

109,455.  Each mining town was a feudal dominion with the company acting as lord and master … The laws were the company’s rules.  (Working Class & Class & Repression & United States & Solidarity & Industrial Action & Strike & Trade Union & Labour & Poverty & Coal & Mining)  ibid.

 

109,456.  1907: The most deadly mine disaster in US history occurred when an explosion killed 361 men and boys in a West Virginia coal mine.  (Working Class & Class & Repression & United States & Solidarity & Industrial Action & Strike & Trade Union & Labour & Poverty & Coal & Mining)  ibid.

 

109,457.  Accidents in American mines were double that of Germany, three times more than England.  (Working Class & Class & Repression & United States & Solidarity & Industrial Action & Strike & Trade Union & Labour & Poverty & Coal & Mining & Accident)  ibid.

 

109,458.  ‘Freedom from industrial feudalism … freedom from the terrorism inflicted by hired gunmen … and the struggle for liberties promised in the Bill of Rights.’  (Working Class & Class & Repression & United States & Solidarity & Industrial Action & Strike & Trade Union & Labour & Poverty)  ibid.  2003 American Labor History Theme Study

 

109,459.  In 2012 coal miners in Kanawha Country in West Virginia issued a list of demands including a shorter workday, the right to organise, recognition of a worker’s constitutional rights to free speech and assembly, an end to the blacklisting of union organisers, and alternatives to company stores.  The requested pay raise would have cost the company fifteen cents per miner per day.  Instead of negotiating, the company hired a private militia to break the strike.  (Working Class & Class & Repression & United States & Solidarity & Industrial Action & Strike & Trade Union & Labour & Poverty & Coal & Mining)  ibid.

 

109,460.  [Mother] Jones had been declared The Most Dangerous Woman in America.  (Working Class & Class & Repression & United States & Solidarity & Industrial Action & Strike & Trade Union & Labour & Poverty & Coal & Mining)  ibid.  

7