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Labor & Labour
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  Labor & Labour  ·  Labour Party (GB)  ·  Ladder  ·  Lake & Lake Monsters  ·  Lamb  ·  Land  ·  Language  ·  Laos  ·  Las Vegas  ·  Lass  ·  Last Words  ·  Latin  ·  Laugh & Laughter  ·  Law & Lawyer (I)  ·  Law & Lawyer (II)  ·  Laws of Science  ·  Lazy & Laziness  ·  Leader & Leadership  ·  Learn & Learning  ·  Lebanon  ·  Lecture & Lecturer  ·  Left Wing  ·  Leg  ·  Leisure  ·  Lend & Lending  ·  Leprosy  ·  Lesbian  ·  Letter  ·  Ley Lines  ·  Libel  ·  Liberal & Liberalism & Neo-Liberalism  ·  Liberia & Liberians  ·  Liberty  ·  Library  ·  Libya & Libyans  ·  Lies & Liar & Lying  ·  Life & Search For Life (I)  ·  Life & Search For Life (II)  ·  Life After Death  ·  Life's Like That (I)  ·  Life's Like That (II)  ·  Light  ·  Lightning  ·  Like  ·  Limerick  ·  Limit & Limits  ·  Lincoln, Abraham  ·  Linen  ·  Lion  ·  Listen & Listener  ·  Literature  ·  Little  ·  Liverpool  ·  Loan  ·  Local & Civil Government  ·  Loch Ness Monster  ·  Lockerbie Bombing  ·  Logic  ·  London (I)  ·  London (II)  ·  Lonely & Loneliness  ·  Look  ·  Lord  ·  Los Angeles  ·  Lose & Loss  ·  Lot (Bible)  ·  Lottery  ·  Louisiana  ·  Love & Lover  ·  Loyal & Loyalty  ·  LSD & Acid  ·  Lucifer  ·  Luck & Lucky  ·  Luke (Bible)  ·  Lunacy & Lunatic  ·  Lunar Society  ·  Lunch  ·  Lungs  ·  Lust  ·  Luxury  

★ Labor & Labour

5,100.  Our struggle is the struggle of every working man and woman in America.  We built this country, we have fought and died in its wars, paid our taxes and built every road and building in it from one coast to the other.  And all we’ve asked in return is a fair day’s pay for a fair day’s work.  (Trade Union & Labor)  Moe Lepore, president Boston Metro Area Local APWU 2010

 

 

5,101.  When a man tells you that he got rich through hard work, ask him whose.  (Trade Union & Labor & Rich & Work)  Don Marquis
 

 

5,147.  Poorly paid labour is inefficient labour the world over.  (Labour & Pay)  Victor Hugo & Henry George

 

 

5,148.  A man is not idle because he is absorbed in thought.  There is visible labour and there is invisible labour.  Victor Hugo

 

 

5,149.  Everything in the world is purchased by labour.  David Hume

 

 

5,150.  We labour soon, we labour late,

To feed the titled knave, man;

And a’ the comfort we’re to get,

Is that ayont the grave, man.  Robert Burns, The Tree of Liberty

 

 

5,151.  Death is the end of life; ah, why

Should life all labour be?  (Labour & Death)  Alfred Lord Tennyson, The Lotus-Eaters 1832

 

 

5,153.  Nay, but I choose my physician and my clergyman, thus indicating my sense of the quality of their work.  By all means, also, choose your bricklayer; that is the proper reward of the good workman, to be ‘chosen’.  The natural and right system respecting all labour is that it should be paid at a fixed rate, but the good workman employed, and the bad workman unemployed.  The false, unnatural, and destructive system is when the bad workman is allowed to offer his work at half-price, and either take the place of the good, or force him by his competition to work for an inadequate sum.  (Labour & Work)  John Ruskin

 

 

6,558.  We want one man to be always thinking, and another to be always working, and we call one a gentleman, and the other an operative; whereas the workman ought often to be thinking, and the thinker often to be working, and both should be gentlemen, in the best sense.  As it is, we make both ungentle, the one envying, the other despising, his brother; and the mass of society is made up of morbid thinkers and miserable workers.  Now it is only by labour that thought can be made healthy, and only by thought that labour can be made happy, and the two cannot be separated with impunity.  (Think & Labour & Work & Mass)  John Ruskin, The Stones of Venice, chapter The Nature of Gothic

 

 

5,154.  Such hath it been – shall be – beneath the sun

The many still must labour for the one.  Lord Byron, The Corsair

 

 

5,155.  The pavement and the road are crowded with purchasers and street-sellers.  The housewife in her thick shawl, with the market-basket on her arm, walks slowly on, stopping now to look at the stall of caps, and now to cheapen a bunch of greens.  Little boys, holding three or four onions in their hand, creep between the people, wriggling their way through every interstice, and asking for custom in whining tones, as if seeking charity.  Then the tumult of the thousand different cries of the eager dealers, all shouting at the top of their voices, at one and the same time, is almost bewildering.  ‘So-old again,’ roars one.  ‘Chestnuts all ’ot, a penny a score,’ bawls another.  ‘An ’aypenny a skin, blacking,’ squeaks a boy.  ‘Buy, buy, buy, buy, buy – bu-u-uy!’ cries the butcher.  ‘Half-quire of paper for a penny,’ bellows the street stationer.  ‘An ’aypenny a lot ing-uns.’  ‘Twopence a pound grapes.’  ‘Three a penny Yarmouth bloaters.’  ‘Who’ll buy a bonnet for fourpence?’  ‘Pick ’em out cheap here! three pair for a halfpenny, bootlaces.’  ‘Now’s your time! beautiful whelks, a penny a lot.’  ‘Here’s ha’p’orths,’ shouts the perambulating confectioner.  ‘Come and look at ’em! Here’s toasters!’ bellows one with a Yarmouth bloater stuck on a toasting-fork.  ‘Penny a lot, fine russets,’ calls the apple woman: and so the Babel goes on.  (Labour & London & Poor & Working Class & Poverty)  Henry Mayhew, Victorian social essay    

 

 

5,156.  Sir, I am a true labourer.  I earn that I eat, get that I wear; owe no man hate, envy no man’s happiness; glad of other men’s good, content with my harm; and the greatest of my pride is to see my ewes graze and my lambs suck.  William Shakespeare, As You Like It III ii 71-75, Corin to Touchstone

 

 

5,157.  The labour we delight in physics pain.  (Labour & Pain)  William Shakespeare, Macbeth II iii 56

 

 

5,158.  A wise and frugal Government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned.  This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circle of our felicities.  (Labour & Government & Industry)  Thomas Jefferson

 

 

5,159.  Without labour nothing prospers.  (Labour & Prosperity)  Sophocles

 

 

5,160.  Labour was the first price, the original purchase – money that was paid for all things.  It was not by gold or by silver but by labour that all wealth of the world was originally purchased.  (Labour & Wealth)  Adam Smith

 

 

5,174.  Our merchants and masters complain much of the bad effects of high wages in raising the price and lessening the sale of goods.  They say nothing concerning the bad effects of high profits.  They are silent with regard to the pernicious effects of their own gains.  They complain only of those of other people.  (Labour & Work & Profit & Wages)  Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations

 

 

5,161.  I never visualised labour as separate men and women of different sorts and kinds ... labour was an abstraction, which seemed to denote an arithmetically calculable mass of human beings, each individual a repetition of the other.  Beatrice Webb, My Apprenticeship 1926

 

 

5,163.  The essential act of war is destruction, not necessarily of human lives, but of the products of human labour.  War is a way of shattering to pieces, or pouring into the stratosphere, or sinking in the depths of the sea, materials which might otherwise be used to make the masses too comfortable, and hence, in the long run, too intelligent.  (Labour & War)  George Orwell, 1984

 

 

5,166.  This business of petty inconvenience and indignity, of being kept waiting about, of having to do everything at other people’s convenience, is inherent in working-class life.  A thousand influences constantly press a working man down into a passive role.  He does not act, he is acted upon.  He feels himself the slave of mysterious authority and has a firm conviction that ‘they’ will never allow him to do this, that, and the other.  Once when I was hop-picking I asked the sweated pickers (they earn something under sixpence an hour) why they did not form a union.  I was told immediately that ‘they’ would never allow it.  Who were ‘they’?  I asked.  Nobody seemed to know, but evidently ‘they’ were omnipotent.  (Labour & Work & Working Class)  George Orwell, The Road to Wigan Pier  

 

 

5,177.  A plongeur is a slave, and a wasted slave, doing stupid and largely unnecessary work.  He is kept at work, ultimately, because of a vague feeling that he would be dangerous if he had leisure.  And educated people, who should be on his side, acquiesce in the process, because they know nothing about him and consequently are afraid of him.  (Labour & Slave & Work & Working Class)  George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London

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