Call us:
0-9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
  Eagle  ·  Ears  ·  Earth (I)  ·  Earth (II)  ·  Earthquake  ·  East Timor  ·  Easter  ·  Easter Island  ·  Eat  ·  Ebola  ·  Eccentric  ·  Economics (I)  ·  Economics (II)  ·  Ecstasy (Drug) & Molly & MDMA  ·  Ecstasy (Joy)  ·  Ecuador & Ecuadorian  ·  Edom & Edomites  ·  Education  ·  Edward I & Edward the First  ·  Edward II & Edward the Second  ·  Edward III & Edward the Third  ·  Edward IV & Edward the Fourth  ·  Edward VI & Edward the Sixth  ·  Edward VII & Edward the Seventh  ·  Edward VIII & Edward the Eighth  ·  Efficient & Efficiency  ·  Egg  ·  Ego & Egoism  ·  Egypt & Egyptians  ·  Einstein, Albert  ·  El Dorado  ·  El Salvador  ·  Elect & Election  ·  Electric & Electricity  ·  Electro-Magnetic Radiation  ·  Electrons  ·  Elements  ·  Elephant  ·  Elijah (Bible)  ·  Elisha (Bible)  ·  Elite & Elitism  ·  Elizabeth I & Elizabeth the First  ·  Elizabeth II & Elizabeth the Second  ·  Elohim  ·  Eloquence & Eloquent  ·  Emerald  ·  Emergency & Emergency Powers  ·  Emigrate & Emigration  ·  Emotion  ·  Empathy & Sympathy  ·  Empire  ·  Empire Roman  ·  Empire UK & British Empire  ·  Empire US & American Empire (I)  ·  Empire US & American Empire (II)  ·  Empire US & American Empire (III)  ·  Empiric & Empirical  ·  Employ & Employment  ·  Employee  ·  Employer  ·  Enceladus  ·  End  ·  End of the World (I)  ·  End of the World (II)  ·  Endure & Endurance  ·  Enemy  ·  Energy  ·  Engagement  ·  Engine & Engineer & Engineering (I)  ·  Engine & Engineer & Engineering (II)  ·  England & English  ·  England 1400 to 1899 (I)  ·  England 1400-1899 (II)  ·  England 1400-1899 (III)  ·  England 1900 to Date  ·  England Early to 1399  ·  Enjoy & Enjoyment  ·  Enlightenment  ·  Enterprise  ·  Entertain & Entertainment  ·  Enthusiasm & Enthusiastic  ·  Entropy & Entropic  ·  Environment  ·  Envy & Envious  ·  Epidemic  ·  Epigrams  ·  Epiphany  ·  Epitaph  ·  Equality & Equal Rights  ·  Equatorial Guinea  ·  Equity & Equity Law  ·  Error  ·  Escape  ·  Eskimo & Inuit  ·  Esoteric  ·  Essex  ·  Establishment  ·  Esther (Bible)  ·  Eternity & Eternal  ·  Ether (Atmosphere)  ·  Ether (Drug)  ·  Ethics & Ethical  ·  Ethiopia & Ethiopians  ·  Eugenics  ·  Eulogy  ·  Europa  ·  Europe & Europeans  ·  European Union  ·  Euthanasia  ·  Evangelical & Evangelicalism  ·  Evening  ·  Everything  ·  Evidence  ·  Evil  ·  Evolution (I)  ·  Evolution (II)  ·  Exam & Examination  ·  Example  ·  Excellent & Excellence  ·  Excess & Excessive  ·  Excite & Excitement  ·  Excommunicate & Excommunication  ·  Excuse & Excuses  ·  Execute & Execution  ·  Exercise & Exercises  ·  Exist & Existence  ·  Existential & Existentialism  ·  Exorcism & Exorcist  ·  Expect & Expectation  ·  Expenditure  ·  Experience  ·  Experiment  ·  Expert & Expertise  ·  Explain & Explanation  ·  Explode & Explosion  ·  Explore & Expedition  ·  Export & Exports  ·  Expose & Exposure  ·  Extinct & Extinction  ·  Extra-Sensory Perception & ESP  ·  Extraterrestrial  ·  Extreme & Extremism  ·  Extremophiles  ·  Eyes  
<E>
Elizabeth I & Elizabeth the First
E
  Eagle  ·  Ears  ·  Earth (I)  ·  Earth (II)  ·  Earthquake  ·  East Timor  ·  Easter  ·  Easter Island  ·  Eat  ·  Ebola  ·  Eccentric  ·  Economics (I)  ·  Economics (II)  ·  Ecstasy (Drug) & Molly & MDMA  ·  Ecstasy (Joy)  ·  Ecuador & Ecuadorian  ·  Edom & Edomites  ·  Education  ·  Edward I & Edward the First  ·  Edward II & Edward the Second  ·  Edward III & Edward the Third  ·  Edward IV & Edward the Fourth  ·  Edward VI & Edward the Sixth  ·  Edward VII & Edward the Seventh  ·  Edward VIII & Edward the Eighth  ·  Efficient & Efficiency  ·  Egg  ·  Ego & Egoism  ·  Egypt & Egyptians  ·  Einstein, Albert  ·  El Dorado  ·  El Salvador  ·  Elect & Election  ·  Electric & Electricity  ·  Electro-Magnetic Radiation  ·  Electrons  ·  Elements  ·  Elephant  ·  Elijah (Bible)  ·  Elisha (Bible)  ·  Elite & Elitism  ·  Elizabeth I & Elizabeth the First  ·  Elizabeth II & Elizabeth the Second  ·  Elohim  ·  Eloquence & Eloquent  ·  Emerald  ·  Emergency & Emergency Powers  ·  Emigrate & Emigration  ·  Emotion  ·  Empathy & Sympathy  ·  Empire  ·  Empire Roman  ·  Empire UK & British Empire  ·  Empire US & American Empire (I)  ·  Empire US & American Empire (II)  ·  Empire US & American Empire (III)  ·  Empiric & Empirical  ·  Employ & Employment  ·  Employee  ·  Employer  ·  Enceladus  ·  End  ·  End of the World (I)  ·  End of the World (II)  ·  Endure & Endurance  ·  Enemy  ·  Energy  ·  Engagement  ·  Engine & Engineer & Engineering (I)  ·  Engine & Engineer & Engineering (II)  ·  England & English  ·  England 1400 to 1899 (I)  ·  England 1400-1899 (II)  ·  England 1400-1899 (III)  ·  England 1900 to Date  ·  England Early to 1399  ·  Enjoy & Enjoyment  ·  Enlightenment  ·  Enterprise  ·  Entertain & Entertainment  ·  Enthusiasm & Enthusiastic  ·  Entropy & Entropic  ·  Environment  ·  Envy & Envious  ·  Epidemic  ·  Epigrams  ·  Epiphany  ·  Epitaph  ·  Equality & Equal Rights  ·  Equatorial Guinea  ·  Equity & Equity Law  ·  Error  ·  Escape  ·  Eskimo & Inuit  ·  Esoteric  ·  Essex  ·  Establishment  ·  Esther (Bible)  ·  Eternity & Eternal  ·  Ether (Atmosphere)  ·  Ether (Drug)  ·  Ethics & Ethical  ·  Ethiopia & Ethiopians  ·  Eugenics  ·  Eulogy  ·  Europa  ·  Europe & Europeans  ·  European Union  ·  Euthanasia  ·  Evangelical & Evangelicalism  ·  Evening  ·  Everything  ·  Evidence  ·  Evil  ·  Evolution (I)  ·  Evolution (II)  ·  Exam & Examination  ·  Example  ·  Excellent & Excellence  ·  Excess & Excessive  ·  Excite & Excitement  ·  Excommunicate & Excommunication  ·  Excuse & Excuses  ·  Execute & Execution  ·  Exercise & Exercises  ·  Exist & Existence  ·  Existential & Existentialism  ·  Exorcism & Exorcist  ·  Expect & Expectation  ·  Expenditure  ·  Experience  ·  Experiment  ·  Expert & Expertise  ·  Explain & Explanation  ·  Explode & Explosion  ·  Explore & Expedition  ·  Export & Exports  ·  Expose & Exposure  ·  Extinct & Extinction  ·  Extra-Sensory Perception & ESP  ·  Extraterrestrial  ·  Extreme & Extremism  ·  Extremophiles  ·  Eyes  

★ Elizabeth I & Elizabeth the First

Elizabeth I & Elizabeth the First: see Henry VIII & James I & England & Monarch & Royal Family & Queen

Anon - Simon Schama TV - David Starkey TV - Tracy Borman - Elizabeth I: The Secret Life TV - Mystery Files: The Virgin Queen TV - Elizabeth I: Killer Queen? TV - Philippa Gregory - Sarah Gristwood - Chris Skidmore - The Virgin Queen 1955 - Michael Portillo TV - Elizabeth I - Ian Mortimer TV - Curtis & Elton: Blackadder II TV - Fergal Keane TV - Chris Everard - Elizabeth I's War on Terror TV - Secret Rules of the World - Thomas Dekker - Elizabeth: The Golden Age 2007 - Bloody Queens: Elizabeth & Mary TV - Queen Elizabeth: A Timewatch Guide TV - Dan Jones & Suzannah Lipscomb: Elizabeth I TV - Lucy Worsley TV - Elizabeth I's Secret Agents TV - Abducted: Elizabeth I's Children TV -

 

 

124,623.  Elizabeth I consulted the court physician, saying that every time her musicians were preparing to play, she developed a rash.  His diagnosis was that she was suffering from pre-minstrel tension.  Anon

 

 

30,306.  But if Elizabeth put out the fires of religious fanaticism, she lit them in the breasts of patriotic Englishmen and women ... The reinstatement of a truly English way ... It was above all a Protestant Englishness ... Now Protestantism and patriotism were one and the same.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I & Protestantism)  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: Burning Convictions

 

 

30,309.  It doesn’t do to be too starry eyed about the Virgin Queen.  Elizabeth I was only too obviously made of flesh and blood.  She was vain, spiteful, arrogant, she was frequently unjust, and she was often maddeningly indecisive.  But she was also brave, shockingly clever, an eyeful to look at, and on occasions she was genuinely wise.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I)  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: The Body of the Queen

 

30,310.  She simply adored being adored.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,311.  Dudley was everything Cecil was not: flashy, gallant, a noisy extrovert and not least incredibly good looking, especially on a horse.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,312.  Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots: throughout the whole tortured history of their relationship Elizabeth was eaten up by curiosity about her cousin Mary ... Mary was next in line to the English throne.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,313.  The cult, the religion of Elizabeth, was spectacularly created.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,314.  In Rome the Pope declared that Elizabeth was to be considered a heretic.  Whoever sends her out of the world, the Pope decreed, does not only does not sin but gains merit in the eyes of God.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I & Catholicism)  ibid.

 

30,315.  A mother dressed in a breast-plate of steel.   Everything Elizabeth had ever learned came together at Tilbury ... ‘My loving people, I come among you not for my recreation and disport but being resolved in the midst of the heat of the battle to live and die amongst you all.  To lay down for God and my Kingdom and for my people my honour and blood, even in the dust.  I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a King.  And a King of England too.  And think foul scorn that Spain or any prince of Europe should dare invade the borders of my realm.  To which rather dishonour I myself will take up arms.’  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,316.  Elizabeth and Mary Stuart never met.  (Great Britain & England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

 

45,904.  Down with the cult of the Virgin Mary and up with the cult of the Virgin Queen.  (Shakespeare & Elizabeth I)  Simon Schama’s Shakespeare I, BBC 2012

 

 

45,912.  The ultimate drama queen – Elizabeth I.  (Shakespeare & Elizabeth I)  Simon Schama’s Shakespeare II: Hollow Crowns BBC 2012

 

45,913.  Shakespeare could see the ageing queen up close.  (Shakespeare & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

 

90,139.  Elizabeth I’s Rainbow Portrait: This one pulls you into a labyrinth of signs and symbols.  (Art & Elizabeth I & Signs & Symbols)  Face of Britain by Simon Schama, BBC 2015

 

 

112,901.  Matters came to a head in the parliament of 1556 which attempted to force Elizabeth to name a successor and by implication to exclude the claim of Mary, queen of Scots.  (Monarchy & England & Elizabeth I)  Monarchy by David Starkey s2e3: Shadow of a King

 

112,902.  The first to move against her was Rome.  (Monarchy & England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,683.  Elizabeth had an incredibly fiery temper inherited I think from both her father Henry VIII and her mother Anne Boleyn.  And she was capable of lashing out at those around her ... She one day stabbed one of the ladies in the back of the hand with a fork for serving her ill at dinner.  And she broke another lady’s finger in a fit of temper when the said lady had married without Elizabeth’s consent.  (England & Elizabeth I)  Tracy Borman, author Elizabeths Women

 

 

30,928.  Elizabeth was one of the most remarkable individuals ever to wear the crown.  (England & Elizabeth & Monarchy)  Monarchy by David Starkey s3e3: Rule Britannia 

 

 

30,684.  They called her the Virgin Queen: Elizabeth I.  Her reign is said to have produced a golden age.  But behind the legend lies many secrets and an enigma that’s obscured over the centuries.  Why didn’t Elizabeth marry and provide an heir to the throne?  (England & Elizabeth I)  Elizabeth I: The Secret Life

 

30,685.  One sensational theory ... The desperate servants substituted a local child for the princess ... The substitute was a boy ... The tale has endured.  (England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,686.  It seemed Elizabeth was a forsaken child.  (England & Elizabeth I)  ibid.

 

30,687.  Henry’s love-letters to Anne gushed with desire to marry, but the Pope refused to grant him a divorce.  (England & Henry VIII & Letters)  ibid.

 

30,688.  King Henry married his third wife, Jane Seymour, and she gave him the son he had always wanted, Prince Edward.  (England & Henry VIII)  ibid.

 

30,689.  The young princess moved in with her step-mother who quickly married a close friend, Thomas Seymour.  The relationship between the princess and her step-father sparked another scandal that may have put her off marriage for good.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,690.  On her deathbed reports claim that Elizabeth firmly decreed that under no condition should her body be embalmed.  Did the Queen have something to hide?  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,691.  Her One True Love: he was of course Lord Robert Dudley.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,692.  Her letters to Dudley hint at intimacy.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,693.  To many the death of Dudley’s wife wasn’t a coincidence ... Did Elizabeth have anything to do with it?  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,694.  She wore heavy white make-up in ever thicker layers.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

 

30,695.  In 1560 an English nobleman’s wife is found mysteriously dead.  But this is no ordinary Elizabethan housewife.  She is Amy Robsart, wife of Robert Dudley.  Reputed lover of Elizabeth I.  (England & Elizabeth)  Mystery Files: The Virgin Queen

 

30,696.  Elizabeth will never be able to marry Dudley because of one rather inconvenient fact: he is already married.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,697.  Ultimately, the jury’s verdict is accidental death.  They determine that she died from a broken neck after falling down the stairs.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,698.  In 2007 the original Coroner’s report into Amy’s death was uncovered in the national archives.  It reveals in addition to her broken neck there were two lacerations to her head.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,699.  Elizabeth is not above suspicion.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,700.  There are reasons for both Cecil and Dudley to be suspects.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

30,701.  With so much rumour around the death the two were unable to marry.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

 

 

30,702.  September 8th 1560: the discovery of a young woman’s body is about to shock Elizabethan England.  The death of Amy Robsart will threaten Elizabeth’s reputation and it will ultimately destroy the Tudor dynasty.  Amy is found dead at the foot of a staircase.  The authorities claimed she broke her neck accidentally falling down stairs.  Now by extraordinary chance the Coroner’s report has been unearthed after 450 years.  It suggests foul play.  The document contains the explosive revelation that Amy had other serious injuries.  (England & Elizabeth)  Elizabeth I: Killer Queen?

 

30,703.  Aged just twenty-five Elizabeth had to take control of her country.  Ruthless and fiercely protestant William Cecil became the most influential man in the country.  Persuading Elizabeth to choose the right husband is one of Cecil’s chief concerns.  Foreign suitors circle the Queen like vultures.  (England & Elizabeth)  ibid.

1