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World War I (II) & First World War (II)
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★ World War I (II) & First World War (II)

World War I (II) & First World War (II): see World War I (I) & War & World War II & World War III & Army & Soldier & Battle & Weapons & Europe & Art & Poetry & Literature & Film & Balkans

Secrets of War TV - WWI: The First Modern War TV - Teenage Tommies TV - The First Great Escape TV - Gallipoli: When Murdoch Went to War TV - Lusitania: 18 Minutes That Changed the World TV - I Was There: The Great War Interviews TV - Breaking the Codes TV - Dan Snow TV - War of Words: Soldier-Poets of the Somme TV - Peter Barton TV - David Hayman TV - R C Sheriff & Journey’s End 1988 - All Quiet on the Western Front 1979 - The Great War TV - Secret History: Britain’s Forgotten Army TV - Carroll Quigley - 100 Days to Victory TV - World War I: The Final Hours TV - They Shall Not Grow Old TV - The Corbett Report - David Reynolds: Long Shadow TV - Wings of War TV -

 

 

93,856.  Trench warfare, Verdun, the Somme, the Battle of Jutland ...  death on a scale never seen before.  Both sides relentlessly harnessed technology in pursuit of better weapons and communications.   But to little avail.  The war was fought in deadlock.  Technology was not enough.  Secrets of War: World War I: Germany’s Secret Gamble

 

93,857.  World War I ushered in the modern age of instability.  ibid.

 

 

93,858.  The First War, the Great War, was supposed to be the war to end all wars.  But along its battle-lines ancient tactics collided with new and powerful weapons.  The first weapons of mass destruction.  (World War I & Weapon)  WWI: The First Modern War: Armoured Beasts s1e1

 

93,859.  Half a million men killed in the first five months alone.  ibid.

 

93,860.  Tank after tank got stuck in the craters.  The attack was falling apart fast ... In their first battle seventeen of the twenty-five tanks were destroyed or broke down in no-man’s land.  (World War I & Tank)  ibid.

 

93,861.  The tanks had achieved what was once thought impossible.  (World War I & Tank)  ibid.

 

93,862.  Germany developed tanks with improved speed, range and radio communications, and put them at the centre of their new battle-plan – Blitzkrieg.  (World War I & Tank)  ibid.

 

 

93,863.  The German military developed a radical plan ... Chlorine could be used as a weapon.  (World War I & Bio-Chemical Weapons)  WWI: The First Modern War: Clouds of Death s1e2

 

93,864.  Ypres: the chlorine gas cloud killed five thousand allied troops within minutes, and injured five thousand more.  (World War I & Bio-Chemical Weapons)  ibid.

 

93,865.  Within months, both sides were using poison gas.  (World War I & Bio-Chemical Weapons)  ibid.

 

93,866.  German forces prepared to retaliate with the most horrific weapon of mass destruction of the First World War – mustard gas.  (World War I & Bio-Chemical Weapons)  ibid.

 

 

93,867.  To try and break the deadlock of the trenches, Germany decided to deploy a devastating new weapon, taking the war into the air.  (World War I & Aircraft)  WWI: The First Modern War: Massive Air Attacks s1e3

 

93,868.  The LZ4 was Zeppelin’s largest airship to date.  446 feet ... It had a top speed of 30mph.  (World War I & Aircraft)  ibid.

 

93,869.  Life in the trenches was primitive and miserable.  (World War I & Aircraft)  ibid.

 

93,870.  There were only 33 anti-aircraft guns in the whole of England at the time.  (World War I & Aircraft)  ibid.

 

93,871.  Like all early aircraft the BE2c was made of wood and canvas with a top speed of just 80 mph.  (World War I & Aircraft)  ibid.

 

93,872.  Type R Super Zeppelin 650 feet 60 mph ... Twice as many bombs as before.  (World War I & Aircraft)  ibid.

 

93,873.  The deliberate targeting of civilians with aerial bombing.  (World War I & Aircraft)  ibid.

 

 

93,874.  Both sides were desperate to develop new ways to win the War.  With the world’s largest Navy the British have controlled the seas for more than two hundred years.  But Germany believed a new weapon could finally end centuries of British naval supremacy.  WWI: The First Modern War: Underwater Killers, H2 2014

 

93,875.  The race was on to build a submersible warship.  ibid.

 

93,876.  The great liner [Lusitania] sank in just eighteen minutes, with nearly 2,000 souls on board.  ibid.

 

93,877.  The depth charge levelled the playing field.  ibid.

 

 

93,878.  They were as young as fourteen.  Nearly a quarter of a million answered the call to arms in the First World War ... This is the story of five teenage Tommies.  Teenage Tommies, BBC 2014

 

93,879.  Soldiers were supposed to be nineteen to fight.  ibid.

 

 

93,880.  This is the incredible story of a group of Allied officers attempting the impossible: to break out from one of Germany's most brutal and secure prisoner of war camps.  They spent nine frantic months digging a tunnel with improvised tools, facing asphyxiation and the threat of being buried alive.  (World War I & Escape)  The First Great Escape, National Geographic 2015

 

93,881.  The further the men dug the less oxygen there was to breathe.  (World War I & Escape)  ibid.

 

93,882.  Their daring and inventive escape remains an inspirational example of courage and persistence in the face of adversity.  (World War I & Escape)  ibid.

 

 

93,883.  During the First World War the Truth died every day alongside soldiers whose suffering was obscured by big words like Honour or Civilisation.  Gallipoli: When Murdoch Went to War, BBC 2015

 

93,884.  In the autumn of 1915 Keith Murdoch wrote a first-hand report on the Gallipoli campaign.  This young Australian journalist described how a daring military adventure had gone disastrously wrong.  And he didn’t pull his punches  ibid.

 

93,885.  A battle fought with words, ink and paper.  ibid.

 

93,886.  Keith Murdoch missed most of the Gallipoli campaign.  ibid.

 

 

93,887.  7th May 1915: World War I is less than a year old: America remains neutral: 12 miles off the coast of Ireland the world’s finest passenger liner has entered the war zone.  Lusitania: 18 Minutes That Changed the World, Channel 5 2015

 

93,888.  At ten minutes past two, a single German torpedo strikes her hull.  ibid.

 

93,889.  Her seven decks accommodate over two thousand passengers.  ibid.

 

93,890.  Only six of forty-four lifeboats were successfully launched.  ibid.

 

93,891.  ‘Pushing aside the bodies of drowned children and babies like lily-pads on a pond’.  ibid.  Diana Preston, author Lusitania: An Epic Tragedy

 

93,892.  More than seven hundred people have been saved.  ibid.

 

 

95,280.  I had never seen so many dead men clumped together as what I saw then.  And I thought to myself, The whole world's dead; they’re all dead.  I Was There: The Great War Interviews, Yesterday 2015, survivor

 

95,281.  More than two hundred and fifty eye-witnesses were filmed for The Great War series.  ibid.

 

95,282.  We soldiers stabbed each other, strangled each other, went for each other like mad dogs.  ibid.  German survivor

 

95,284.  You hear in the distance quite a mild pop as the gun fired five miles away, and then a humming sound as it approached you through the air growing louder and louder until it was like the roar of an airplane coming in to land on the tarmac.  (World War I & Sound & Gun)  ibid.  Charles Carrington

 

95,287.  A man’s world: women had no part in it; and when I went on leave, what one did was to escape out of the man’s world into a woman’s world.  ibid.  survivor   

 

 

97,517.  On 29th May 1916 Room 40 was able to advice the chief of war staff … that the German high seas fleet was about to put to sea … The British now had a huge opportunity to destroy the German fleet once and for all because of the code-breakers’ skill.  (Code & World War I)  Breaking the Codes, Movies4men 2016

 

 

97,946.  On May 31st 1916 the British and German fleets clashed in what would be the biggest and bloodiest naval battle of the First World War, and in fact in the whole of navy history – the Battle of Jutland.  This was the era of the Dreadnought … The was one battle that didn’t go to plan.  (Navy & Ship & World War I & Battle)  Dan Snow, Battle of Jutland: The Navy’s Bloodiest Day

 

97,947.  Britain had lost more than 60,000 men.  (Navy & Ship & World War I & Battle)  ibid.

 

97,948.  The British had 151 ships; the Germans 99.  And Britain expected an easy victory .. the Royal Navy came off worse.  (Navy & Ship & World War I & Battle)  ibid.

 

97,949.  ‘The greater number of injuries were caused by burns.’  (Navy & Ship & World War I & Battle)  ibid.

 

97,950.  There were only 18 survivors of the Queen Mary.  (Navy & Ship & World War I & Battle)  ibid.

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