Call us:
0-9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
  Wage & Wages  ·  Wait & Waiting  ·  Wales & Welsh  ·  Walk & Walker  ·  Wall Street  ·  Wander & Wanderer  ·  Want & Wants  ·  War & Warrior (I)  ·  War & Warrior (II)  ·  War in Heaven  ·  War on Terror (I)  ·  War on Terror (II)  ·  Washington  ·  Waste & Waste Basket  ·  Watch (Observe)  ·  Watch (Time)  ·  Watchers, Meet the  ·  Water  ·  Watergate  ·  Weak & Weakness  ·  Wealth & Wealthy  ·  Weapons  ·  Weather  ·  Wedding  ·  Weep  ·  Weigh & Weight & Weights  ·  Welfare & Welfare State  ·  Werewolf  ·  West & Western Films  ·  West Virginia  ·  Whale  ·  Wheat  ·  Wheels  ·  Whisky & Scotch  ·  Whistleblower  ·  White  ·  White Dwarf  ·  White Hole  ·  White House  ·  Wicked & Wickedness  ·  Widow & Widower  ·  Wife & Wives  ·  Wild & Wilderness  ·  Will (Death)  ·  Will (Motive)  ·  William & Mary  ·  Win & Winner  ·  Wind & Windy  ·  Window  ·  Wine  ·  Winter  ·  Wisconsin  ·  Wise & Wisdom  ·  Wish & Wishes  ·  Wit & Wits  ·  Witch & Witchcraft  ·  Witness  ·  Wizard & Wizardry  ·  Woe  ·  Wolf  ·  Woman & Women (I)  ·  Woman & Women (II)  ·  Wonder  ·  Wood  ·  Woods  ·  Wool  ·  Woolly Mammoth  ·  Word & Words  ·  Work & Worker (I)  ·  Work & Worker (II)  ·  Working Class  ·  World  ·  World War I (I) & First World War (I)  ·  World War I (II) & First World War (II)  ·  World War II (I) & Second World War (I)  ·  World War II (II) & Second World War (II)  ·  World War II (III) & Second World War (III)  ·  World War III  ·  Worm  ·  Wormhole  ·  Worry  ·  Worse & Worst  ·  Worship  ·  Wound  ·  Wrath  ·  Wrestling  ·  Write & Writing & Writer  ·  Wrong  ·  Wyoming  
<W>
Worship
W
  Wage & Wages  ·  Wait & Waiting  ·  Wales & Welsh  ·  Walk & Walker  ·  Wall Street  ·  Wander & Wanderer  ·  Want & Wants  ·  War & Warrior (I)  ·  War & Warrior (II)  ·  War in Heaven  ·  War on Terror (I)  ·  War on Terror (II)  ·  Washington  ·  Waste & Waste Basket  ·  Watch (Observe)  ·  Watch (Time)  ·  Watchers, Meet the  ·  Water  ·  Watergate  ·  Weak & Weakness  ·  Wealth & Wealthy  ·  Weapons  ·  Weather  ·  Wedding  ·  Weep  ·  Weigh & Weight & Weights  ·  Welfare & Welfare State  ·  Werewolf  ·  West & Western Films  ·  West Virginia  ·  Whale  ·  Wheat  ·  Wheels  ·  Whisky & Scotch  ·  Whistleblower  ·  White  ·  White Dwarf  ·  White Hole  ·  White House  ·  Wicked & Wickedness  ·  Widow & Widower  ·  Wife & Wives  ·  Wild & Wilderness  ·  Will (Death)  ·  Will (Motive)  ·  William & Mary  ·  Win & Winner  ·  Wind & Windy  ·  Window  ·  Wine  ·  Winter  ·  Wisconsin  ·  Wise & Wisdom  ·  Wish & Wishes  ·  Wit & Wits  ·  Witch & Witchcraft  ·  Witness  ·  Wizard & Wizardry  ·  Woe  ·  Wolf  ·  Woman & Women (I)  ·  Woman & Women (II)  ·  Wonder  ·  Wood  ·  Woods  ·  Wool  ·  Woolly Mammoth  ·  Word & Words  ·  Work & Worker (I)  ·  Work & Worker (II)  ·  Working Class  ·  World  ·  World War I (I) & First World War (I)  ·  World War I (II) & First World War (II)  ·  World War II (I) & Second World War (I)  ·  World War II (II) & Second World War (II)  ·  World War II (III) & Second World War (III)  ·  World War III  ·  Worm  ·  Wormhole  ·  Worry  ·  Worse & Worst  ·  Worship  ·  Wound  ·  Wrath  ·  Wrestling  ·  Write & Writing & Writer  ·  Wrong  ·  Wyoming  

★ Worship

Worship: see Praise & Hymn & Prayer & Church & God & Religion & Faith & Belief & Compliment & Sing & Song & Glory & Wonder & Cult & Idol

George Carlin - Thomas Paine - C S Lewis - Mark Twain - Christopher Hitchens - Edward Gibbon - Ian McEwan - Matthew Alper - William Shakespeare - Manly Palmer Hall - Daniel C Dennett - Mysteries of the Bible TV - Star Trek: Deep Space Nine TV - Blackadder TV - Steve Pickstock - Aleister Crowley - Monty Python's Life of Brian 1979 - Thomas Carlyle - Koran 4:101-103 - Fydor Dostoyevsky - Avesta: Khorda Avesta - Robert Tressell - Gore Vidal - Fred Dibnah TV - Hail, Satan? 2019 - Sacred Wonders TV -

 

 

94,103.  I’ve begun worshipping the sun for a number of reasons.  First of all, unlike some other gods I could mention, I can see the sun.  It’s there for me every day.  And the things it brings me are quite apparent all the time: heat, light, food, and a lovely day.  There’s no mystery, no-one asks for money, I don’t have to dress up, and there’s no boring pageantry.  And interestingly enough, I have found that the prayers I offer to the sun and the prayers I formerly offered to ‘God’ are all answered at about the same 50% rate.  (Worship & Sun & God & Prayer & Gods)  George Carlin, Brain Droppings

 

 

12,315.  The Christian religion and Masonry have one and the same common origin: both are derived from the worship of the Sun.  The difference between their origin is, that the Christian religion is a parody on the worship of the Sun, in which they put a man whom they call Christ, in the place of the Sun, and pay him the same adoration which was originally paid to the Sun.  (Jesus & Christian & Freemasonry & Sun & Worship)  Thomas Paine, The Age of Reason

 

 

120.  A man can no more diminish God’s glory by refusing to worship Him than a lunatic can put out the sun by scribbling the word ‘darkness’ on the walls of his cell.  (God & Glory & Worship & Lunatic)  C S Lewis

 

 

220.  ... a God who could make good children as easily a bad, yet preferred to make bad ones; who could have made every one of them happy, yet never made a single happy one; who made them prize their bitter life, yet stingily cut it short; who gave his angels eternal happiness unearned, yet required his other children to earn it; who gave is angels painless lives, yet cursed his other children with biting miseries and maladies of mind and body; who mouths justice, and invented hell – mouths mercy, and invented hell – mouths Golden Rules and foregiveness multiplied by seventy times seven, and invented hell; who mouths morals to other people, and has none himself; who frowns upon crimes, yet commits them all; who created man without invitation, then tries to shuffle the responsibility for man’s acts upon man, instead of honorably placing it where it belongs, upon himself; and finally, with altogether divine obtuseness, invites his poor abused slave to worship him!  (God & Children & Commandment & Blame & Worship)  Mark Twain, No. 44, The Mysterious Stranger

 

 

223.  If I were to construct a God I would furnish Him with some way and qualities and characteristics which the Present lacks.  He would not stoop to ask for any man's compliments, praises, flatteries; and He would be far above exacting them.  I would have Him as self-respecting as the better sort of man in these regards.

 

He would not be a merchant, a trader.  He would not buy these things.  He would not sell, or offer to sell, temporary benefits of the joys of eternity for the product called worship.  I would have Him as dignified as the better sort of man in this regard.

 

He would value no love but the love born of kindnesses conferred; not that born of benevolences contracted for.  Repentance in a man’s heart for a wrong done would cancel and annul that sin; and no verbal prayers for forgiveness be required or desired or expected of that man.

 

In His Bible there would be no Unforgiveable Sin.  He would recognize in Himself the Author and Inventor of Sin and Author and Inventor of the Vehicle and Appliances for its commission; and would place the whole responsibility where it would of right belong: upon Himself, the only Sinner.

 

He would not be a jealous God – a trait so small that even men despise it in each other.

 

He would not boast.

 

He would keep private Hs admirations of Himself; He would regard self-praise as unbecoming the dignity of his position.

 

He would not have the spirit of vengeance in His heart.  Then it would not issue from His lips.

 

There would not be any hell – except the one we live in from the cradle to the grave.

 

There would not be any heaven – the kind described in the world’s Bibles.

 

He would spend some of His eternities in trying to forgive Himself for making man unhappy when he could have made him happy with the same effort and he would spend the rest of them in studying astronomy.  (God & Praise & Worship & Forgiveness & Sin & Jealousy & Hell & Heaven & Unhappy)  Mark Twain, notebook

 

 

281.  As well as being man-made, it’s fear-made ... At its worse it’s the undeveloped part of the psyche that leads to totalitarianism that wants to worship, that wants a boss.  That wants a celestial dictatorship.  (God & Fear & Totalitarianism & Worship & Dictatorship & God’s Fascism)  Christopher Hitchens v Rabbi David Wolpe, Boston 2010

 

 

606.  Is it good for the world to appeal to our credulity and not to our scepticism?  Is it good for the world to worship a deity that takes side in wars and human affairs?  (God & Scepticism & Worship)  Christopher Hitchens v Tony Blair: Is Religion a Force for Good in the World? 2010 

 

108,214.  Well there are people who think talking to a wall is actually a form of divine worship.  Christopher Hitchens vs Tony Blair

 

 

95,981.  Sigmund Freud was quite correct to describe the religious impulse, in The Future of an Illusion, as essentially ineradicable until or unless the human species can conquer its fear of death and its tendency to wish-thinking.  Neither contingency seems very probable.  All that the totalitarians have demonstrated is that the religious impulse – the need to worship – can take even more monstrous forms if it is repressed.  This might not necessarily be a compliment to our worshipping society.  (Religion & Repression & Worship)  Christopher Hitchens, God is Not Great p247

 

 

456.  The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the Roman world, were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful.  And thus toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord.  (Religion & Worship)  Edward Gibbon 1737-94, The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

 

 

657. Perhaps we have to confront the fact that we’re hardwired for religion too.  That no amount of rationality or science or modernity is ever going to relieve us of it.  This is what we are - most of us ... The problem I think for atheists is that there are so many very clever sane responsible people like the Archbishop of Canterbury who believe in a sky-God.  And who think that gathering in a large beautiful barn on a Sunday and sending up your thoughts is actually going to influence future events.  It does seem a remarkable set of beliefs to me.  (Religion & God & Worship & Atheism & Belief)  Ian McEwan, interview Professor Richard Dawkins

 

 

683.  Why are we so afraid to let go of the antiquated belief systems by which we were raised?  What if our great, great, great, great and then some grandparents were wrong?  What if those who viewed lighting as God’s wrath were mistaken?  What if their primitive interpretations were wrong?  Moreover, what harm could come in at least exploring the tools of science as a means to fortify ourselves, as a means to minimize life’s pain and maximize our happiness?

 

So, which will it be?  Are we to accept the underlying principles conceived in scientific method – reason – or are we to obstinately hold on to those antiquated belief systems that spring from our pre-scientific, ignorant past?

 

... Besides, if there truly is no spiritual reality, just think of all the energy we’ve wasted in practicing our illusionary beliefs.  Think of all the useless rituals and ceremonies we’ve performed, all of the sacrifices we’ve made, the shrines we’re built, the purses we’ve filled, the gods to whom we’ve worshipped and prayed and, meanwhile all of it in vain.  (Religion & God & Belief & Gods & Worship & Science)  Matthew Alper, The God Part of the Brain

1