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Wise & Wisdom
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★ Wise & Wisdom

Wise & Wisdom: see Knowledge & Good & Evil & Judgment & Education & Logic & Fool & Strength & Understanding & Book

Muhammad Ali - Thomas Huxley - Albert Pike - Aleister Crowley - William Shakespeare - H L Mencken - Bertolt Brecht - J Robert Oppenheimer - Thomas Szasz - Arthur Eddington - Carl Sagan - Isaac Asimov - Immanuel Kant - Francis Bacon - Confucius - Martin Fischer - Oliver Wendell Holmes - Alfred Lord Tennyson - Proverbs - Kurt Vonnegut - Marilyn Vos Savant - Mortimer J Adler - Robert Jordan - Christopher Hitchens - Anton Chekhov - Sophocles - Hermann Hesse - Kahlil Gilbran - Albert Einstein - T S Eliot - Clifford Stoll - E O Wilson - Ludwig van Beethoven - Henry David Thoreau - Friedrich Nietzsche - Baltasar Gracian - Bertrand Russell - Rona Goffen - Star Trek: The Next Generation TV - Charles Dickens - Robert A Heinlein - Cicero - George W Bush - Euripides - Abba Eban - Francis Quarles - Francis Hutcheson - P D James - Count Oxenstierna - Edward Young - Aristotle - Socrates - Jimi Hendrix - Mahatma Gandhi - C G Jung - David Hume - J D Salinger - John Stuart Mill - Lord Byron - Joan Rivers - Monty Python’s The Life of Brian 1979 - Saint Augustine - Horace - Buddha - Mahayana Texts - Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Norman Cousins - Napoleon Bonaparte - Voltaire - Joseph Roux - Calvin Coolidge - C S Lewis - Bruce Lee - John Webster - John Milton - The Gambler 2014 - Jaina Sutras - Robert Louis Stevenson - I Kings 3:11&12 - I Kings 3:16-28 - I Kings 4:27-33 - I Kings 5:12 - I Kings 10:4 - I Kings 10:23 - Job 12:2 - Job 12:12 - Job 15:8&9 - Job 28:12 - Job 28:18 - Job 28:20 - Job 28:28 - Job 32:9 - Job 37:24 - Proverbs 2:7&8 - Proverbs 3:13 - Proverbs 4:5-7 - Proverbs 8:11&12 - Proverbs 10:1 - Proverbs 10:13&14 - Proverbs 10:23 - Proverbs 11:12 - Proverbs 12:8 - Proverbs 14:1&6&16&33 - Proverbs 16:16&21&23 - Proverbs 17:24 - Proverbs 19:8 - Proverbs 21:11&22&30 - Proverbs 23:9 - Proverbs 23:23 - Proverbs 24:3&5-7&14&23 - Ecclesiastes 2:13&14&16&26 - Ecclesiastes 7:4&5&12&16&19&25 - Ecclesiastes 8:1&5 - Ecclesiastes 9:16-18 - Ecclesiastes 10:10-14 - Isaiah 5:21 - Ezekiel 28:3-5 - Wisdom 1:4&6 - Wisdom 6:8&9&24 - Enoch 2:42:1-3 - Ecclesiasticus 1:1&4&5&14&18&19 - Ecclesiasticus 38:25 - Matthew 2:1&11 - Matthew 10:16 - Matthew 11:19 - Romans 1:22 - Romans 12:16 - I Corinthians 1:19-21&27 - I Corinthians 3:18-20 - Ephesians 5:15 - James 1:5 - Bhagavad Gita - The Talmud - Richard Dawkins - Daniel Defoe - Charles Dickens - Steven D Levitt & Stephen J Dubner - George Eliot - Author Unknown -                                        

 

 

128,260.  And the wise man is he or she who knows their life purpose.  (Boxers: Ali & Wisdom)  Muhammad Ali, cited What’s My Name

 

 

810.  Logical consequences are the scarecrows of fools and the beacons of wise men.  (Truth & Logic & Fool & Wisdom)  Thomas Henry Huxley, Science and Culture and Other Essays 1881

 

 

834.  Fictions are necessary to the people, and the Truth becomes deadly to those who are not strong enough to contemplate it all in its brilliance.  In fact, what can there be in common with the vile multitude and sublime wisdom?  The truth must be kept secret, and the masses need a teaching proportioned to their imperfect reason.  (Truth & Fiction & Masses & Wisdom & Reason)  Albert Pike, Sovereign Grand Commander, Mother Supreme Council of the World, the Supreme Council of the 33rd degree, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry

 

 

2,662.  Science is always discovering odd scraps of magical wisdom and making a tremendous fuss about its cleverness.  (Science & Wisdom)  Aleister Crowley, The Confessions of Aleister Crowley

 

 

93,431.  Great lords, wise men ne’er sit and wail their loss.  William Shakespeare, Richard Duke of York V iv 1, Queen Margaret

 

 

47,774.  O my Antonio, I do not know of these

That therefore only are reputed wise

For saying nothing.  William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice I i 95-97, Graziano to Antonio, with Bassanio

 

841.  The seeming truth which cunning times put on

To entrap the wisest.  (Truth & Wisdom)  ibid.  III ii 100-101, Bassiano to self

 

93,430.  I never knew so young a body with so old a head.  ibid.  IV i 163

 

 

47,775.  For wisdom cries out in the streets, but no man regards it.  William Shakespeare, Henry IV I ii 88-89, Prince Harry to Sir John

 

 

47,776.  There’s not one wise man about twenty that will praise himself.  William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing V i 66-67, Beatrice to Benedick

 

 

47,777.  Your wisdom is consumed in confidence.  William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar II ii 49, Calpurnia to Caesar

 

 

46,171.  The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.  (Shakespeare & Wisdom & Fool)  As You Like It, Globe Theatre Sky Arts 2012, Touchstone

 

 

47,779.  Well, God give them wisdom that have it; and those that are fools, let them use their talents.  William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night I v 13-14, Feste

 

 

47,780.  You’re much more ataxed for want of wisdom

Than praised for harmless mildness.  William Shakespeare, The History of King Lear I iv 327-328, Gonoril

 

92,705.  Wisdom and goodness to the vile seem vile;

Filths savour but themselves.  (Goodness & Wisdom)  ibid.  IV ii 37-38, Albany

 

 

940.  Democracy is a pathetic belief in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance.  (Belief & Democracy & Wisdom & Ignorance)  H L Mencken

 

 

47,785.  The older I grow, the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom.  (Wisdom & Old Age)  H L Mencken

 

 

2,374.  The aim of science is not to open the door to infinite wisdom, but to set a limit to infinite error.  (Science & Wisdom & Error)  Bertolt Brecht

 

 

2,380.  We do not believe any group of men adequate enough or wise enough to operate without scrutiny or without criticism.  (Science & Wisdom & Criticism)  J Robert Oppenheimer 

 

 

73,469.  The stupid neither forgive nor forget; the naive forgive and forget; the wise forgive but do not forget.  (Forgetfulness & Stupidity & Wise & Forgiveness)  Thomas Szasz, The Second Sin

 

 

2,426.  Science is one thing, wisdom is another.  Science is an edged tool, with which men play like children, and cut their own fingers.  (Science & Wisdom)  Arthur Eddington, cited Robert L Weber, More Random Walks in Science 1982

 

 

2,667.  Science is based on experiment, on a willingness to challenge old dogma, on an openness to see the universe as it really is.  Accordingly, science sometimes requires courage – at the very least the courage to question the conventional wisdom.  (Science & Courage & Experiment & Wisdom)  Carl Sagan

 

 

2,472.  Science is much more than a body of knowledge.  It is a way of thinking.  This is central to its success.  Science invites us to let the facts in, even when they don’t conform to our preconceptions.  It counsels us to carry alternative hypotheses in our heads and see which ones best match the facts.  It urges on us a fine balance between no-holds-barred openness to new ideas, however heretical, and the most rigorous skeptical scrutiny of everything – new ideas and established wisdom.  We need wide appreciation of this kind of thinking.  It works.  It’s an essential tool for a democracy in an age of change.  Our task is not just to train more scientists but also to deepen public understanding of science.  (Science & Knowledge & Think & Fact & Idea & Sceptics & Wisdom & Democracy & Understanding)  Carl Sagan, ‘Why We Need to Understand Science’ Skeptical Inquirer 14:3

 

 

2,597.  The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom.  (Science & Life’s Like That & Knowledge & Society & Wisdom)  Isaac Asimov

 

 

47,794.  Knowledge is indivisible.  When people grow wise in one direction, they are sure to make it easier for themselves to grow wise in other directions as well.  On the other hand, when they split up knowledge, concentrate on their own field, and scorn and ignore other fields, they grow less wise – even in their own field.  (Wisdom & Knowledge)  Isaac Asimov, The Roving Mind 1983 ch 25

 

 

2,636.  Science is organized knowledge.  (Science & Knowledge & Wisdom)  Wisdom is organized life.  Immanuel Kant, Critique of Pure Reason
 

 

4,626.  Nothing doth more hurt in a state than that cunning men pass for wise.  (Man & Wisdom)  Francis Bacon, Essays, 1625, ‘Of Cunning’

 

 

47,798.  A prudent question is one half of wisdom.  (Wisdom & Question)  Francis Bacon

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