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London (II)
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  Labor & Labour  ·  Labour Party (GB)  ·  Ladder  ·  Lake & Lake Monsters  ·  Lamb  ·  Land  ·  Language  ·  Laos  ·  Las Vegas  ·  Lass  ·  Last Words  ·  Latin  ·  Laugh & Laughter  ·  Law & Lawyer (I)  ·  Law & Lawyer (II)  ·  Laws of Science  ·  Lazy & Laziness  ·  Leader & Leadership  ·  Learn & Learning  ·  Lebanon  ·  Lecture & Lecturer  ·  Left Wing  ·  Leg  ·  Leisure  ·  Lend & Lending  ·  Leprosy  ·  Lesbian  ·  Letter  ·  Ley Lines  ·  Libel  ·  Liberal & Liberalism & Neo-Liberalism  ·  Liberia & Liberians  ·  Liberty  ·  Library  ·  Libya & Libyans  ·  Lies & Liar & Lying  ·  Life & Search For Life (I)  ·  Life & Search For Life (II)  ·  Life After Death  ·  Life's Like That (I)  ·  Life's Like That (II)  ·  Light  ·  Lightning  ·  Like  ·  Limerick  ·  Limit & Limits  ·  Lincoln, Abraham  ·  Linen  ·  Lion  ·  Listen & Listener  ·  Literature  ·  Little  ·  Liverpool  ·  Loan  ·  Local & Civil Government  ·  Loch Ness Monster  ·  Lockerbie Bombing  ·  Logic  ·  London (I)  ·  London (II)  ·  Lonely & Loneliness  ·  Look  ·  Lord  ·  Los Angeles  ·  Los Angeles Dunbar Armored Robbery, 1997  ·  Lose & Loss  ·  Lot (Bible)  ·  Lottery  ·  Louis Lord Mountbatten  ·  Louisiana  ·  Love & Lover  ·  Loyal & Loyalty  ·  LSD & Acid  ·  Lucifer  ·  Luck & Lucky  ·  Luke (Bible)  ·  Lunacy & Lunatic  ·  Lunar Society  ·  Lunch  ·  Lungs  ·  Lust  ·  Luxury  

★ London (II)

125,562.  I’ve come to London: the epicentre of homelessness in the UK.  Over a quarter of England’s rough sleepers live in the capital: that’s more than 1,000 people who bed down here every night.  I’m joining this community with no money.  (Homelessness & London)  60 Days on the Streets II

 

125,563.  If I can find an empty doorway.  (Homelessness & London)  ibid.

 

125,564.  London’s homeless community hasn’t been too welcoming.  (Homelessness & London)  ibid.  

 

125,565.  People are still being kind.  (Homelessness & London)  ibid.

 

125,566.  Not everyone on these streets is actually homeless.  (Homelessness & London)  ibid.

 

125,567.  It’s disturbing not to be able to more for an OAP in such poor health.  (Homelessness & London)  ibid.

 

 

127,545.  This place is fucked!  Everything is fucking backwards!  (Gangstas: Canada & Nova Scotia & Trailers & Mockumentaries & Backward & London)  Trailer Park Boys: Out of the Park Europe I: London, Netflix 2016, Ricky

 

 

128,913.  I’m beginning to hate London.  It’s changed.  It’s not like it was when we were kids.  It’s dying slowly.  Bit by bit.  Nobody laughs out loud any more.  Nobody whistles.  It’s all grab grab grab.  Money money money.  Too many cars, too many drunks, too many foreigners.  Filth everywhere.  It’s not a place to raise kids any more.  (Gangstas & London)  Fox III: Pugilism not Vandalism, Renie to Vinny, Thames TV 1980

 

 

132,954.  A short stretch, barely eight miles, but it packs a punch like no other: because I’m walking through the heart of the capital.  (River & London)  The Thames: Britain’s Great River with Tony Robinson III    

 

132,955.  The rise and fall of thee tidal Thames can be as much as 23 feet.  (River & London)  ibid.

 

 

134,073.  I have a little problem.  Well, maybe not that little. [opens freezer door]  She was a drug mule … Better get her inside quick.  I think she’s defrosting.  Spotless s1e1, Canal+ 2015, Martin  

 

134,074.  Yes.  Heroin.  A lot.  I want you to cut her open, get the drugs out, I sell it …  ibid.

 

134,075.  For a job well done.  Mr Clay may call upon you in the future.  ibid.  delivery boy

 

 

134,076.  I accept his refusal to get involved in my business.  You’re free to go.  Spotless s1e2, Mr Clay

 

134,077.  We’re done now.  Don’t come back.  I don’t need you here.  ibid.  Jean to Martin

 

134,078.  I know a lot of stuff, Jean.  A lot of damaging information.  ibid.  bent rozzer

 

 

135,060.  The Thames: Lifeblood of Britain’s capital.  An empire was born on its banks, and from here it traded with the world.  Throughout its long life the river has sustained its people.  But at times it has been fierce and unpredictable.  A focus for work and play.  (River & London & Docks)  The River Thames: Then & Now, Channel 5 2020

 

135,061.  The River Thames flows 215 miles to the North Sea.  Its epic course takes it into the heart of London, passing landmarks recognised the world over.  Lightermen have been hauling cargo along the Thames for centuries.  (River & London & Docks)  ibid.  

 

135,062.  In the early twentieth century, in the age before smokeless fuel, London was often shrouded in fog known as Pea Soupers.  (River & London & Fog & Docks)  ibid.

 

135,063.  ‘Eight miles of docks on either side’ … ‘It was tough manual work’ … (River & London & Docks)  ibid.

 

135,064.  In the post-war years the docks continued to thrive.  Few Londoners could imagine a city without a working port and an army of working men at its heart.  But by the 1960s that future was disappearing in front of the workers’ eyes.  (River & London & Docks)  ibid.

 

135,065.  Back then the key to London’s wealth was its docks.  (River & London & Docks)  ibid.

 

135,066.  Now the Thames handles more than five million tons of cargo.  The vast majority of cargo now arrives and leaves in containers.  (River & London & Docks)  ibid.

 

135,067.  ‘The first container ship arrived in this country in the early 1960s. And that was the beginning of the end.  And very fast about 35,000 people lost their jobs on the docks and then all the ancillary workers, and it was catastrophic.’  (River & London & Docks & Unemployment)  ibid.  Sophie Campbell, historian         

 

135,068.  Battersea would be key as London went electric … The largest brick construction in Europe.  (River & London & Docks)  ibid.

 

135,069.  Twenty-eight bridges span the river … ‘I’m standing in front of the most iconic bridge on the Thames: Tower Bridge.  Everybody knows it.  It’s got those twin towers.  And it was built in 1894 so that the shipping could still come into this very valuable bit of water, the pool of London … It looks medieval, and that was the plan … It’s a really early steel-framed construction, but on the outside they put Cornish Granite and Portland Stone dressings … So it looks like a medieval castle.’  (River & London & Docks & Bridge)  ibid.  Sophie Campbell

 

135,070.  An extraordinary structure that helps keep the flood-water away … The Barrier had closed nearly 200 times since becoming operational in 1982. (River & London & Docks & Flood)  ibid.         

 

135,071.  1858 was the year of the Great Stink.  A smell of old father Thames was so bad that MPs moved parliament out of London.  For centuries, untreated human waste was pumped directly into the Thames … Bazalgette built 1,100 miles of sewers.  (River & London & Smell & Sewer)  ibid.      

 

 

135,967.  Euston Station in Central London: one of the capital’s biggest rain terminals.  Tucked alongside it is St James Gardens.  On the face of it, an ordinary park.  But look closer and you’ll find clues that there’s a hidden history here.  An incredible window into London’s past.  Because beneath these seemingly unremarkable gardens lies a vast ceremony, and now part of Britain’s ever archaeological dig.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery)  Britain’s Biggest Dig, BBC 2020

 

135,968.  The huge excavations here at St James’s: it’s part of major investigations along the 150-mile route of HS2, the new high-speed rail link between London and Birmingham and beyond.  But before a track is laid, archaeologists will investigate every hill and valley along the route.  The law requires them to excavate and rebury any human remains.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery)  ibid.   

 

135,969.  The cheapest plots were in the east, and the highest status burials were in the west: closer to the chapel, closer to God.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery)  ibid.   

 

 

136,079.  We move up the line to another gigantic excavation to uncover how Victorian Birmingham grew into a boom town of the industrial revolution.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery)  Britain’s Biggest Dig II

 

136,080.  London, Spring 2019: next to Euston Station the excavation of the 230-year-old St James’s burial ground is reaching its peak.  Hundreds Archaeologists are unearthing the largest cemetery ever dug up in Britain.      (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery)  ibid.  

 

136,081.  During the Second World War this part of London was targeted by the Luftwaffe, and many bombs detonated in and around the cemetery.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery)  ibid.   

 

136,087.  Digs have already started along the route of HS2.  Surveys indicate an important site awaits to be unearthed on average every mile along the route.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery)  ibid. 

 

136,088.  Summer of 2018: Next to the City’s famous Bullring, the Fox & Grapes pub, once part of a vibrant working-class community, is being demolished after it is being surveyed by archaeologists.  Across the road lies the giant Park Street burial ground, where archaeologists face another huge task … excavations will range over five hectares … making way for the next 7-platform terminus of HS2.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery & Birmingham)  ibid.   

 

136,089.  At the start of the eighteenth century Birmingham was a market town of just 15,000 people.  (Railway & Archaeology & London & Grave & Burial & Cemetery & Birmingham)  ibid.     

 

 

135,970.  The River Thames, January 1806: All of London has turned out to witness the most elaborate funeral procession in living memory.  A broken body is being escorted home with the pomp and ceremony usually reserved for royalty.  The man who three months ago gave his life in his hour of triumph at the Battle of Trafalgar is laid to rest with a state funeral at St Paul’s cathedral.  And in this moment, Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson becomes a cult figure, representing for many victory and glory.  (Navy & London & Funeral & Ceremony & Hero)  Nelson: Britain’s Great Naval Hero, Channel 5 2020  

 

 

136,102.  The River Fleet: Fleet Street runs directly over the ancient watercourse.  Within 20 years the Romans had built a small town roughly half a square mile in size with a fortified garrison.  Londinium rapidly began a thriving hub, providing road links across Britain and to the larger empire across the channel.  (Road & Great Britain & London)   Dan Jones I, Walking Britain’s Roman Roads, Channel 5 2020

 

 

136,105.  Ermine Street: the Romans’ straightest road which runs north from their capital in London to what became their second city in Britain – York, founded in around 100 A.D.  Most of Ermine Street is still in use today, though we know it better as the A1.  This is Bishopsgate right in the heart of the city of London and it’s the start of Ermine Street proper.  (Road & Great Britain & London)  Dan Jones, Walking Britain’s Roman Roads II: Ermine Street   

 

136,106.  The [London] Mithraeum was built around 1,700 years ago.  It fell into ruin and was buried when the Romans left our land in the 5th century.  It was uncovered in 1954 when an office block was built near Cannon Street, though it’s been moved to a new site in recent years.  (Road & Great Britain & London & Temple)  ibid.   

 

136,107.  The Roman paved this road all the way to York, making one of the straightest roads they ever built, and shared their religious beliefs with our native tribes.  Like many of Britain’s Roman roads, Ermine Street had been adapted over the passing centuries, and it’s now part of our modern road system.  (Road & Great Britain)  ibid.  

 

 

136,138.  Stane Street which runs from London all the way down to the south coast.  (Road & Great Britain & London)  Walking Britain’s Roman Roads VI: Stane Street

 

136,139.  By the 4th century they [Romans’] had mounting problems.  They had occupied our land for more than 300 years but they were being increasingly attacked by the forces within Britain.  (Road & Great Britain & London)  ibid.  

 

136,140.  Stane Street runs 67 miles from London to Chichester.  The route is closely followed by our modern roads.  (Road & Great Britain & London)  ibid.

 

136,141.  By the second century A.D. Londinium was a thriving city with a population of around 60,000.  (Road & Great Britain & London)  ibid. 

 

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