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★ London (II)

113,272.  On the trail of the pickpockets … She is apparently known in Germany as a member of an organised crime gang.  Oxford Street Revealed s3e4

 

113,273.  After months of planning the new [JD] store is ready.  ibid.      

 

 

113,274.  Drug dealers give out business cards.  Oxford Street Revealed s3e5  

 

113,275.  A team from Thames Water are getting ready for a night out with a difference.  Tonight sewer-flushers Gary and Tim are on the attack; they’re involved in an ongoing battle with fat.  (London & Sewage)  ibid. 

 

 

113,330.  The Oxford Street police team take on skankers: fake drug dealers with a reputation for robbery.  Oxford Street Revealed s3e6

 

 

113,367.  Orb team: it’s usually their job to spot pickpockets and bag thieves.  Oxford Street Revealed s3e7

 

113,368.  Many of the beggars are known to police.  ibid. 

 

 

113,430.  Police are on the trail of bike-snatchers and shop-lifters. Oxford Street Revealed s3e8

 

113,431.  There’s a row going on about mosaics underground [Tottenham Court Road].  (London & Underground)  ibid.

 

 

9,188.  So this is London.  Rain, a hotel in Kensington, a feeling of depression.  (GBH Films & London)  Tiger by the Tail aka Cross-Up 1955 starring Larry Parks & Constance Smith & Donald Stewart & Cyril Chamberlain & Ronan O’Casey & Lisa Daniely & Alexander Gauge & Ronald Leigh-Hut & Thora Hurd & Doris Hare & Marie Bryant et al, director John Gilling  

 

 

98,982.  The siege of Knightsbridge is both an emblem of gross injustice and a gruelling farce.  For three years, a police cordon around the Ecuadorean embassy in London has served no purpose other than to flaunt the power of the state.  It has cost £12 million. The quarry is an Australian charged with no crime, a refugee whose only security is the room given him by a brave South American country.  His ‘crime’ is to have initiated a wave of truth-telling in an era of lies, cynicism and war.

 

The persecution of Julian Assange is about to flare again as it enters a dangerous stage.  From August 20, three quarters of the Swedish prosecutor’s case against Assange regarding sexual misconduct in 2010 will disappear as the statute of limitations expires.  At the same time Washington’s obsession with Assange and WikiLeaks has intensified.  Indeed, it is vindictive American power that offers the greatest threat – as Chelsea Manning and those still held in Guantanamo can attest.

 

The Americans are pursuing Assange because WikiLeaks exposed their epic crimes in Afghanistan and Iraq: the wholesale killing of tens of thousands of civilians, which they covered up, and their contempt for sovereignty and international law, as demonstrated vividly in their leaked diplomatic cables.  WikiLeaks continues to expose criminal activity by the US, having just published top secret US intercepts – US spies’ reports detailing private phone calls of the presidents of France and Germany, and other senior officials, relating to internal European political and economic affairs.  (Persecution & London & Justice & Whistleblower)  John Pilger, article Assange: The Untold Story of an Epic Stuggle for Justice

 

 

99,334.  Two-fifths of the children are malnourished in London.  (London & Poverty)  Mark Thomas Comedy Product s2e2   

 

 

99,962.  Tottenham August 2011: ‘There is intelligence to suggest that Mark Duggan is currently in possession or control of about three firearms and is looking to take possession of a firearm at the scene.’  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  Lawful Killing: Mark Duggan, BBC 2016, rozzers’ briefing

 

99,963.  The police shooting of Mark Duggan in August 2011 triggered the worst riots in modern British history.  People died in those riots … There is still no agreement about what actually happened when Duggan was stopped by armed police on that summer’s day.  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  ibid.   

 

99,964.  The story is wrapped up in secret intelligence … leading to a suspicion that the truth is being hidden.  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  ibid.  

 

99,965.  ‘Something’s not quite right here.  So what is the truth?’  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  ibid.  Mark’s brother

 

99,966.  Trident: a Metropolitan police unit tasked with tackling gun crime.  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  ibid.

 

99,967.  Broadwater Farm Riots in 1985: ‘vicious vicious riots.’  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  ibid.      

 

99,968.  ‘There are very few angels on Broadwater Farm … but they’re not gangstas.’  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  ibid.  Mark’s brother  

 

 

99,969.  News outlets need to be held to account for their coverage of the headline-hitting English riots, a new report has argued.  Media and the Riots: A Call for Action, published on the first anniversary of the Tottenham, north London, riot which took place last August is the first report to examine the impact of the mainstream print and broadcast media’s reporting on the communities most affected.

 

The report, written by University of Leicester sociologist Dr Leah Bassel, reflects the views of those people who attended the Media and the Riots conference held by the Citizen Journalism Educational Trust and The-Latest.com in November.

 

The event brought young people and community members from riot-stricken areas face-to-face with reporters and media scholars.  The report draws on views expressed by the more than 150 participants at the conference as well as the findings of current reports, journalistic reporting and research.

 

It recommends holding the media to account, engaging with journalists, communicating with decision-makers, promoting citizen journalism and social media and ensuring wider access to journalism.

 

Dr Bassel said: ‘It is hard to be balanced when speaking about media coverage of the events of August 2011.  We were all exposed to images of burning buildings, masked youths and shattered shop windows that repeatedly flashed across our screens and pages, and shaped the way we understood these events and our communities.

 

‘There is a lot to say about what the mainstream media did wrong which this report explores in detail including how media coverage was stigmatising, too moralising, overly reliant on official sources in reporting [police shooting victim] Mark Duggan’s death, and may even have incited rioting by disinhibiting looters.  What I want to insist on, though, is that when we take a closer look across different media there are opportunities as well as challenges.’

 

She added: ‘This is not just a report on what went wrong, but also identifies what needs to be done and who needs to do it.  Media actors can be held to account and citizen journalists’ stories can be heard more widely. We need to engage better with decision makers.  And of course our journalists need to be more representative of society.  Let’s break the cycle of unhelpful coverage and let more voices be heard.’

 

Brunel University journalism professor Sarah Niblock, a conference speaker, said: ‘There was too much emphasis (in the riots news coverage) on law and order and an authoritarian stance, driven by too much reliance on official sources [there is a strong section in the report about this] and the binary notions of good versus bad and us versus them.’

 

John Pilger has been quoted as saying at the Rebellious Media conference last year that the language used in the news coverage of the riots by some newspapers and broadcasters was akin to ‘war reporting’, with the rioters and looters treated as the enemy.

 

In its introduction, the report says: ‘Conference participants were angry and dismayed by unbalanced, unhelpful media coverage of the events of August 2011.  This anger began with the reporting of the initial events that triggered the mass disturbances of August 2011, ‘This was the most recent example of how the machinery of the state and the media can work together to misrepresent facts surrounding a death at the hands of the police and the profile of the victim.’

 

A description is given in the report about how the misreporting of Duggan’s death, fed by the police and Independent Police Complaints Commission, played out.

 

‘Conference participants felt that big media tended to portray the disturbances largely as a conflict between black people against white business owners and that the voices of black business people who were affected by the riots were underrepresented in the mainstream media.’

 

They also criticised what they perceived to be the ‘racialisation’ of the riots by mainstream media like BBC TV that gave a platform to David Starkey’s controversial negative view of white young people becoming black and getting involved in the riots.

 

There are lots of positive practical plans in the report for the community and journalists to improve future coverage of such disturbances.  These include community rapid response to correct bad reporting and ‘contact bases’ to be sent to news media to avoid ‘the same ‘rent a quote’ individuals always being interviewed, who may not in fact speak for the community they claim to represent.’  (Gangs & Riot & London & Police & Murder)  Huffington Post article Deborah Hobson 22 October 2012

 

 

104,112.  The heart of Britain’s democracy, Westminster, was struck by a murderous terror attack … innocent people killed and injured randomly targeted.  (Terrorism & London)  Terror in London: A Tonight Special, ITV 2017

 

104,113.  PC Keith Palmer confronts him and is stabbed.  (Terrorism & London)  ibid.

 

104,114.  Eight arrests had been made in London, Birmingham and elsewhere.  So-called Islamic State had claimed responsibility for the attacks.  (Terrorism & London)  ibid.

 

 

105,051.  For 350 years the black cab has been a British institution.  But with the rise of sat navs and minicabs including Uber now outnumbering black cabs four to one, what is it that sets the cabbie apart fromt he rest?  To join the cabbie’s exclusive ranks candidates must pass one of the hardest exams in the world – the Knowledge of London.  Every year 7,000 men and women take on the challenge taking an average of four years to pass this extraordinary test.  Only 30 survive to the end.  Every single one of the capital’s 25,000 streets and 100,000 landmarks must be learned in a remarkable fear of memory.  (Taxi & London)  The Knowledge: The World’s Toughest Taxi Test, Channel 4 2017

 

105,052.  Anyone can apply to be a cabbie.  (Taxi & London)  ibid.  

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