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  Jack the Ripper  ·  Jackson, Michael  ·  Jacob (Bible)  ·  Jain & Jainism  ·  Jamaica  ·  James (Bible)  ·  James I & James the First  ·  James II & James the Second  ·  Japan  ·  Jargon & Cant & Slang  ·  Jazz  ·  Jealous & Jealousy  ·  Jeans  ·  Jehovah's Witnesses  ·  Jeremiah (Bible)  ·  Jericho  ·  Jerusalem  ·  Jest  ·  Jesuits  ·  Jesus Christ (I)  ·  Jesus Christ (II)  ·  Jesus Christ: Second Coming  ·  Jet  ·  Jew & Jewish  ·  Jewellery & Jewelery  ·  Jinn  ·  Joan of Arc  ·  Job (Bible)  ·  Job (Work)  ·  John (Bible)  ·  John I & King John  ·  John the Baptist  ·  Johnson, Boris  ·  Joke  ·  Jonah (Bible)  ·  Jordan & Nabataeans & Petra  ·  Joseph (husband of Mary)  ·  Joseph (son of Jacob)  ·  Joshua (Bible)  ·  Josiah (Bible)  ·  Journalism & Journalist  ·  Journey  ·  Joy  ·  Judah & Judea (Bible)  ·  Judas Iscariot (Bible)  ·  Judge & Judgment  ·  Judgment Day  ·  Jungle  ·  Jupiter  ·  Jury  ·  Just  ·  Justice  
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  Jack the Ripper  ·  Jackson, Michael  ·  Jacob (Bible)  ·  Jain & Jainism  ·  Jamaica  ·  James (Bible)  ·  James I & James the First  ·  James II & James the Second  ·  Japan  ·  Jargon & Cant & Slang  ·  Jazz  ·  Jealous & Jealousy  ·  Jeans  ·  Jehovah's Witnesses  ·  Jeremiah (Bible)  ·  Jericho  ·  Jerusalem  ·  Jest  ·  Jesuits  ·  Jesus Christ (I)  ·  Jesus Christ (II)  ·  Jesus Christ: Second Coming  ·  Jet  ·  Jew & Jewish  ·  Jewellery & Jewelery  ·  Jinn  ·  Joan of Arc  ·  Job (Bible)  ·  Job (Work)  ·  John (Bible)  ·  John I & King John  ·  John the Baptist  ·  Johnson, Boris  ·  Joke  ·  Jonah (Bible)  ·  Jordan & Nabataeans & Petra  ·  Joseph (husband of Mary)  ·  Joseph (son of Jacob)  ·  Joshua (Bible)  ·  Josiah (Bible)  ·  Journalism & Journalist  ·  Journey  ·  Joy  ·  Judah & Judea (Bible)  ·  Judas Iscariot (Bible)  ·  Judge & Judgment  ·  Judgment Day  ·  Jungle  ·  Jupiter  ·  Jury  ·  Just  ·  Justice  

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Journey: see Travel & Holiday & Exploration & Discovery & Experience & Moon & Space & Universe & Arctic & Antarctic & Emigration & Immigration & Bible & Old Testament & Car & Aeroplane & Trains & Tram & Walk & Adventure & Animals & Birds

Orbit: Earth's Extraordinary Journey TV - Star Trek: Voyager TV - A E Housman - Lao Tzu - Walt Whitman - William Shakespeare - Peter Ackroyd - E B White - Patrick Leigh Fermor - Ernest Hemingway - Jack Kerouac - Homer - Charles Dickens - Thomas Hardy - Homer - Ian Mortimer TV - Dracula 1958 - Voyages of Discovery TV - Neil Oliver TV - Simon Reeve TV - Rob Bell TV -  

 

 

4,080.  All of us every day of our lives are on the move ... A journey of epic proportions.  (Earth & Journey)  Orbit: Earth’s Extraordinary Journey I, BBC 2012

 

 

25,750.  Maybe it’s not the destination that matters.  It’s the journey.  (Star Trek: Voyager & Journey)  Star Trek: Voyager s7e26: Endgame part II ***** Harry

 

 

77,914.  Clay lies still, but blood’s a rover;

Breath’s a ware that will not keep.

Up lad: when the journey’s over

They’ll be time enough for sleep.  A E Houseman, A Shropshire Lad

 

 

89,786.  The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.  (Step & Journey)  Lao Tzu, attributed

 

 

91,631.  Afoot and light-hearted I take to the open road,

Healthy, free, the world before me,

The long brown path before me leading wherever I choose.  (Travel & Journey & Tramp)  Walt Whitman, Song of the Open Road, 1871

 

 

91,636.  Must I serve a long apprenticehood

To foreign passages, and in the end,

Having my freedom, boast of nothing else

But that I was a journeyman to grief?  (Travel & Journey)  William Shakespeare, Richard II I iii 271

 

 

91,639.  The endless chatter of this journey had wearied me.  Peter Ackroyd, The Casebook of Victor Frankenstein

 

 

91,640.  Commuter – one who spends his life

In riding to and from his wife;

A man who shaves and takes a train,

And then rides back to shave again.  (Travel & Journey & Train)  E B White, The Commute,r 1982

 

 

91,641.  ‘A splendid afternoon to set out,’ said one of the friends who was seeing me off, peering at the rain and rolling up the window.  (Travel & Journey)  Patrick Leigh Fermor, Loose as the Wind

 

91,642.  It was still a couple of hours till dawn when we dropped anchor in the Hook of Holland.  Snow covered everything and the flakes blew in a slant across the cones of the lamps and confused the glowing discs that spaced out the untrodden quay.  I hadn’t known that Rotterdam was a few miles inland.  I was still the only passenger on the train and this solitary entry, under cover of night and hushed by snow, completed the illusion that I was slipping into Rotterdam, and into Europe, through a secret door.  (Travel & Journey)  ibid.

 

 

91,633.  It is good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.  Ernest Hemingway    

 

 

91,634.  What is that feeling when you’re driving away from people and they recede on the plain till you see their specks dispersing? – it’s the too-huge world vaulting us, and it’s good-bye.  But we lean forward to the next crazy venture beneath the skies.  (Travel & Journey & Road)  Jack Kerouac, On the Road  

 

 

91,645.  One who journeying

Along a way he knows not, having crossed

A place of drear extent, before him sees

A river rushing swiftly toward the deep,

And all its tossing current white with foam,

And stops and turns, and measures back his way.  (Journey & Travel) Homer, The Iliad V:749

 

 

95,118.  It was a harder day’s journey than yesterday’s, for there were long and weary hills to climb; and in journeys, as in life, it is a great deal easier to go down hill than up.  However, they kept on, with unabated perseverance, and the hill has not yet lifted its face to heaven that perseverance will not gain the summit of at last.  Charles Dickens, Nicholas Nickleby

 

 

95,251.  In the third-class seat sat the journeying boy,

And the roof-lamp’s oily flame

Played down on his listless form and face,

Bewrapt past knowing to what he was going,

Or whence he came ...  (Boy & Journey & Train)  Thomas Hardy, Midnight on the Great Western

 

 

97,063.  Tell me, O muse, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wide after he had sacked the famous town of Troy.  Many cities did he visit, and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he was acquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to save his own life and bring his men safely home; but do what he might he could not save his men, for they perished through their own sheer folly in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Hyperion; so the god prevented them from ever reaching home.  Tell me, too, about all these things, O daughter of Jove, from whatsoever source you may know them. 

So now all who escaped death in battle or by shipwreck had got safely home except Ulysses, and he, though he was longing to return to his wife and country, was detained by the goddess Calypso, who had got him into a large cave and wanted to marry him.  But as years went by, there came a time when the gods settled that he should go back to Ithaca; even then, however, when he was among his own people, his troubles were not yet over; nevertheless all the gods had now begun to pity him except Neptune, who still persecuted him without ceasing and would not let him get home.  (Adventure & Journey)  Homer, The Odyssey I 

 

97,064.  But as the sun was rising from the fair sea into the firmament of heaven to shed light on mortals and immortals, they reached Pylos the city of Neleus.  Now the people of Pylos were gathered on the sea shore to offer sacrifice of black bulls to Neptune lord of the Earthquake.  There were nine guilds with five hundred men in each, and there were nine bulls to each guild.  As they were eating the inward meats and burning the thigh bones [on the embers] in the name of Neptune, Telemachus and his crew arrived, furled their sails, brought their ship to anchor, and went ashore.  (Adventure & Journey & Ship)  ibid.  III

 

97,065.  ‘Menelaus, son of Atreus, and you my good friends, sons of honourable men (which is as Jove wills, for he is the giver both of good and evil, and can do what he chooses), feast here as you will, and listen while I tell you a tale in season.  I cannot indeed name every single one of the exploits of Ulysses, but I can say what he did when he was before Troy, and you Achaeans were in all sorts of difficulties.  He covered himself with wounds and bruises, dressed himself all in rags, and entered the enemy’s city looking like a menial or a beggar, and quite different from what he did when he was among his own people.  In this disguise he entered the city of Troy, and no one said anything to him.  I alone recognized him and began to question him, but he was too cunning for me.  When, however, I had washed and anointed him and had given him clothes, and after I had sworn a solemn oath not to betray him to the Trojans till he had got safely back to his own camp and to the ships, he told me all that the Achaeans meant to do.’  (Adventure & Journey & Troy)  ibid.  IV 

 

97,066.  ‘I have come, sir,’ replied Telemachus, ‘to see if you can tell me anything about my father.  I am being eaten out of house and home; my fair estate is being wasted, and my house is full of miscreants who keep killing great numbers of my sheep and oxen, on the pretence of paying their addresses to my mother.  Therefore, I am suppliant at your knees if haply you may tell me about my father’s melancholy end, whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some other traveller; for he was a man born to trouble.  Do not soften things out of any pity for myself, but tell me in all plainness exactly what you saw.  If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service either by word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed by the Trojans, bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all.’  (Adventure & Journey)  ibid.  IV  

 

97,067.  ‘We are speaking god and goddess to one another, one another, and you ask me why I have come here, and I will tell you truly as you would have me do.  Jove sent me; it was no doing of mine; who could possibly want to come all this way over the sea where there are no cities full of people to offer me sacrifices or choice hecatombs?  Nevertheless I had to come, for none of us other gods can cross Jove, nor transgress his orders. He says that you have here the most ill-starred of half those who fought nine years before the city of King Priam and sailed home in the tenth year after having sacked it.  On their way home they sinned against Minerva, who raised both wind and waves against them, so that all his brave companions perished, and he alone was carried hither by wind and tide.  Jove says that you are to let this by man go at once, for it is decreed that he shall not perish here, far from his own people, but shall return to his house and country and see his friends again.’  (Adventure & Journey & Gods)  ibid.  V  Mercury

 

97,068.  ‘Stranger,’ replied Alcinous, ‘I am not the kind of man to get angry about nothing; it is always better to be reasonable; but by Father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo, now that I see what kind of person you are, and how much you think as I do, I wish you would stay here, marry my daughter, and become my son-in-law.  If you will stay I will give you a house and an estate, but no one (heaven forbid) shall keep you here against your own wish, and that you may be sure of this I will attend to-morrow to the matter of your escort.  You can sleep during the whole voyage if you like, and the men shall sail you over smooth waters either to your own home, or wherever you please, even though it be a long way further off than Euboea, which those of my people who saw it when they took yellow-haired Rhadamanthus to see Tityus the son of Gaia, tell me is the furthest of any place – and yet they did the whole voyage in a single day without distressing themselves, and came back again afterwards.  You will thus see how much my ships excel all others, and what magnificent oarsmen my sailors are.  (Adventure & Journey)  ibid.  VII 

 

97,069.  I am Ulysses son of Laertes, renowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, so that my fame ascends to heaven.  I live in Ithaca, where there is a high mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far from it there is a group of islands very near to one another – Dulichium, Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus.  It lies squat on the horizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while the others lie away from it towards dawn.  It is a rugged island, but it breeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love to look upon.  The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, and wanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddess Circe; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there is nothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, and however splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be far from father or mother, he does not care about it.  Now, however, I will tell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove’s will I met with on my return from Troy.  (Adventure & Journey)  ibid.  VIII 

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