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  Jack the Ripper  ·  Jackson, Michael  ·  Jacob (Bible)  ·  Jain & Jainism  ·  Jamaica & Jamaicans  ·  James (Bible)  ·  James I & James the First  ·  James II & James the Second  ·  Japan & Dogu  ·  Jargon & Cant & Slang  ·  JASON Society & Order of the Quest  ·  Jazz  ·  Jealous & Jealousy  ·  Jeans  ·  Jehovah's Witnesses  ·  Jeremiah (Bible)  ·  Jericho  ·  Jerusalem  ·  Jest & Jester  ·  Jesuits & Society of Jesus  ·  Jesus Christ (I)  ·  Jesus Christ (II)  ·  Jesus Christ – Second Coming  ·  Jet & Jet Engine  ·  Jew & Jewish & Jewry  ·  Jewel & Jewellery & Jewelry  ·  Jinn  ·  Joan of Arc  ·  Job (Bible)  ·  Job (Work)  ·  John (Bible)  ·  John I & King John  ·  John the Baptist  ·  Johnson, Boris  ·  Joke & Jokes & Joker  ·  Jonah (Bible)  ·  Jordan & Nabataeans & Petra  ·  Joseph (husband of Mary)  ·  Joseph (son of Jacob)  ·  Joshua (Bible)  ·  Josiah (Bible)  ·  Journalism & Journalist  ·  Journey  ·  Joy & Joyful  ·  Judah (Bible)  ·  Judas Iscariot (Bible)  ·  Judea (Bible)  ·  Judge & Judgment  ·  Judgment Day  ·  Jungle  ·  Jupiter  ·  Jury  ·  Just  ·  Justice  
<J>
Jazz
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  Jack the Ripper  ·  Jackson, Michael  ·  Jacob (Bible)  ·  Jain & Jainism  ·  Jamaica & Jamaicans  ·  James (Bible)  ·  James I & James the First  ·  James II & James the Second  ·  Japan & Dogu  ·  Jargon & Cant & Slang  ·  JASON Society & Order of the Quest  ·  Jazz  ·  Jealous & Jealousy  ·  Jeans  ·  Jehovah's Witnesses  ·  Jeremiah (Bible)  ·  Jericho  ·  Jerusalem  ·  Jest & Jester  ·  Jesuits & Society of Jesus  ·  Jesus Christ (I)  ·  Jesus Christ (II)  ·  Jesus Christ – Second Coming  ·  Jet & Jet Engine  ·  Jew & Jewish & Jewry  ·  Jewel & Jewellery & Jewelry  ·  Jinn  ·  Joan of Arc  ·  Job (Bible)  ·  Job (Work)  ·  John (Bible)  ·  John I & King John  ·  John the Baptist  ·  Johnson, Boris  ·  Joke & Jokes & Joker  ·  Jonah (Bible)  ·  Jordan & Nabataeans & Petra  ·  Joseph (husband of Mary)  ·  Joseph (son of Jacob)  ·  Joshua (Bible)  ·  Josiah (Bible)  ·  Journalism & Journalist  ·  Journey  ·  Joy & Joyful  ·  Judah (Bible)  ·  Judas Iscariot (Bible)  ·  Judea (Bible)  ·  Judge & Judgment  ·  Judgment Day  ·  Jungle  ·  Jupiter  ·  Jury  ·  Just  ·  Justice  

★ Jazz

Jazz & Jazz Age: see Music & Blues Music & Rock Music & South & Slavery & United States of America & Records & Compose & Reggae

F Scott Fitzgerald - Dave Liebman - Ernest J Gaines - Milt Jackson - Howard Goodall TV - Poster - Charlie Parker - Carr & Fairweather & Priestley - Dizzy Gillespie - Cassandra Wilson - Thelonious Monk - John Coltrane - Wes Montgomery - Billie Holiday - Duke Ellington - Cannonball Adderley - Coleman Hawkins - Louis Armstrong - Jelly Roll Morton - Lester Young - Bill Evans - Max Roach - Wynton Marsalis - Miles Davis - Art Tatum - Leonard Feather - Hank Jones - Dave Brubeck - Ornette Coleman - Oscar Peterson - Bix Spiderbeck - Buddy Collette - Stan Getz - Count Basie - Roy Eldridge - Paul Desmond - Art Blakey - Courtney Pine - Ella Fitzgerald - Arthur Fiedler - Johnny Griffin - Randy Weston - George Gershwin - B B King - Lou Reed - Charlie Haden - Etta James - Sun Ra - Tony Wilson - Mike Figgis - Pat Metheny - Dave Kikoski - Elvin Jones - Paul Whiteman - Branford Marsalis - Melvin Maddocks - Henri Mattise - Benny Green - Cecil Taylor - Ellis Marsalis - Jaco Pastorius - Pepper Adams - Whitney Balliett - Steve Lacy - Teddy Wilson - Eddie Condon - Joe Williams - Early film and radio - Irving Mills - Otis Ferguson - Robert C Ruark - The Melody Maker and Rhythm - James Lincoln Collier - Gerald Early - Poster - Sign - Joseph Goebbels - Gary Giddins - Earl Hines - Ernest J Gaines - Eva Green - Norman Grant - Albert Murray - Metronome - R W S Mendl - Ossie Davis - Ralph Ellison - Ken Burns TV - Masters of American Music TV - Arena TV - 1959: The Year That Changed Jazz TV - That Swing Thing TV - Trad Jazz Britannia TV - Nat Wolff - Blue Note: A Story of Modern Jazz TV - Amy 2015 - What Happened Miss Simone? TV - The Comic Strip Presents TV - I Called Him Morgan 2016 - Reputations TV - Chasing Trane 2016 - Nat King Cole: Afraid of the Dark 2014 - The Death of Amy Winehouse: 13 Reasons TV -

 

 

46,579.  It was an age of miracles.  It was an age of art.  It was an age of excess.  And it was an age of satire.  We were the most powerful nation.  Who could tell us any longer what was fashionable and what was fun?  It was a whole race going hedonistic.  Deciding on pleasure.  The jazz age now raced along under its own power served by great filling stations full of money.  (United States & 1920s & Jazz & Age)  F Scott Fitzgerald, Echoes of the Jazz Age

 

46,580.  Somebody had blundered.  And the most expensive orgy in history was over.  Now once more the belt is tight.  And we summoned the proper expression of horror as we looked back on our wasted youth.  Sometimes though there is a ghostly rumble among the drums.  Enigmatic whispers in the trombones.  That swings me back into the early twenties.  When we drank wood alcohol and every day in every way grew better and better.  And there was an abortive shortening of the skirts.  And people you didn’t want to know said, Yes, we have no bananas.  And it all seems rosy and romantic to us who were young men.  Because we will never quite so intently about our surroundings any more.  (Jazz & United States of America & 1920s)  ibid.

 

46,532.  Though the Jazz Age continued it became less and less an affair of youth.  The sequel was like a children's party taken over by the elders.  ibid.

 

 

9,736.  Art is constant tension and release.  That is where artists live, between the two, or at times, submerged in either.  (Art & Jazz)  Dave Liebman

 

 

39,244.  I have learned as much about writing about my people by listening to blues and jazz and spirituals as I have from reading novels.  The understatements in the tenor saxophone of Lester Young, the crystal, haunting, forever searching sounds of John Coltrane, and the softness and violence of Count Basie’s big band - all have fired my imagination as much as anything in literature.  (Black Culture & Jazz)  Ernest J Gaines

 

 

43,949.  A lot of people think jazz musicians are dope addicts.  But we’ve proved it ain’t so.  (Heroin & Jazz)  Milt Jackson

 

 

46,359.  Jazz as a style eluded definition.  (Music & Jazz)  Howard Goodall's Story of Music: The Popular Age

 

46,362.  In the music of Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk and Dizzy Gillespie, Bebop became the most influential form of jazz.  (Music & Jazz)  ibid.

 

 

46,416.  One Week Only – Beg, Friday Nov. 5th Count Basie And His New Band with Billie Holiday and Jas Rushing: At The 125th Street Apollo: America’s Smartest Colored Shows!  Poster

 

 

46,417.  I realized by using the high notes of the chords as a melodic line, and by the right harmonic progression, I could play what I heard inside me. That’s when I was born.  Charlie Parker, cited Masters of Jazz

 

 

46,418.  I’d been getting bored with the stereotyped changes that were being used all the time at the time, and I kept thinking there’s bound to be something else.  I could hear it sometimes but I couldn't play it ... I found that by using the higher intervals of a chord as a melody line and backing them with appropriately related changes I could play the thing I’d been hearing.  I came alive.  Charlie Parker, cited Hear Me Talkin' to Ya 1955

 

 

46,419.  Music is your own experience, your own thoughts, your wisdom.  If you don't live it, it won't come out of your horn.  They teach you there's a boundary line to music.  But, man, there's no boundary line to art.  Charlie Parker, cited Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker 1977

 

 

46,420.  You’ve got to learn your instrument.  Then, you practice, practice, practice.  And then, when you finally get up there on the bandstand, forget all that and just wail.  (Jazz & Music)  Charlie Parker

 

 

46,421.  They just came out to see the world’s most famous junky.  Charlie Parker, to friend

 

 

46,422.  Why don’t you save me, Diz?  Why don’t you save me?  (Jazz & Save)  Charlie Parker to Dizzy Gillespie, last words before stumbling on to street and into night

 

 

46,423.  The whole essence of a Gillespie solo was cliff-hanging suspense: the phrases and the angle of the approach were perpetually varied, breakneck runs were followed by pauses, by huge interval leaps, by long, immensely high notes, by slurs and smears and bluesy phrases; he always took listeners by surprise, always shocking them with a new thought.  His lightning reflexes and superb ear meant his instrumental execution matched his thoughts in its power and speed.  And he was concerned at all times with swing – even taking the most daring liberties with pulse or beat, his phrases never failed to swing.  Gillespies’s magnificent sense of time and emotional intensity of his playing came from childhood roots.  His parents were Methodists, but as a boy he used to sneak off every Sunday to the uninhibited Sanctified Church.  He said later, ‘The Sanctified Church had deep significance for me musically.  I first learned the significance of rhythm there and all about how music can transport people spiritually.’  Carr & Fairweather & Priestley, The Rough Guide to Jazz

 

 

46,440.  It’s taken me all my life to learn what not to play.  Dizzy Gillespie

 

 

46,441.  Dancers didn’t care whether we played a flattened fifth or a ruptured hundred and twenty-ninth.  They just stand around the band-stand and gawk.  Dizzy Gillespie

 

 

46,456.  Thelonious Monk is one of the jazz pianists who came along and just found the cracks in the middle of the diatonic scale.  Cassandra Wilson, singer

 

 

46,424.  I don’t know where it’s going.  Maybe it’s going to hell.  You can’t make anything go anywhere.  It just happens.  Thelonious Monk, cited Jet Magazine 1960

    

 

46,425.  Well I enjoy doing it.  Thelonious Monk

 

 

46,426.  I don’t consider myself a musician who has achieved perfection and can’t develop any further.  But I compose my pieces with a formula that I created myself.  Take a musician like John Coltrane.  He is a perfect musician, who can give expression to all the possibilities of his instrument.  But he seems to have difficulty expressing original ideas on it.  That is why he keeps looking for ideas in exotic places.  At least I don’t have that problem, because, like I say, I find my inspiration in myself.  (Jazz & Music)  Thelonious Monk

 

 

46,427.  At this time the fashion is to bring something to jazz that I reject.  They speak of freedom.  But one has no right, under pretext of freeing yourself, to be illogical and incoherent by getting rid of structure and simply piling a lot of notes one on top of the other.  There’s no beat anymore.  You can’t keep time with your foot.  I believe that what is happening to jazz with people like Ornette Coleman, for instance, is bad.  There’s a new idea that consists in destroying everything and find what’s shocking and unexpected; whereas jazz must first of all tell a story that anyone can understand.  Thelonious Monk

 

 

46,428.  I say, play your own way.  Don’t play what the public want – you play what you want and let the public pick up on what you doing – even if it does take them fifteen, twenty years.  Thelonious Monk

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