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Doctor
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Doctor: see Pharmaceutics & Medicine & Surgery & Hospital & National Health Service & Health & Biology & Genetics & Blood & Body & Head & Immunology & Nurse & Sickness & Uniform

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1,012.  We have not lost faith but we have transferred it from God to the medical profession.  (Faith & God & Doctor)  George Bernard Shaw   

 

 

63,718.  They took me to an MO – Medical Officer.  And he said, ‘Take your clothes off.’  I said, ‘Well shouldn’t you take me out to dinner or something first?’  (Army & Doctor)  Spike Milligan, Des O’Connor Show

 

 

129,227.  Mitchell: Maybe you’re not cut out to be a doctor in a bawdy 1970s hospital.  (Comedy & Doctor)  Mitchell & Webb s2e1   

 

 

1,195.  It is silliness to live when to live is torment; and then have we a prescription to die when death is our physician.  (Life’s Like That & Torment & Death & Doctor)  William Shakespeare, Othello I iii 308-310, Roderigo

 

 

70,503.  Do, kill the physician,

And the fee bestow upon the foul disease.  William Shakespeare, The History of King Lear I i 153-154, Kent

 

 

2,138.  When I went to the Doctor he gave me six months to live; when I told him I couldn’t pay, he gave me six months more.  (Life's Like That & Doctor)  Walter Matthua

 

 

2,557.  ‘Edward Jenner was a country doctor ... Jenner was interested in everything.’  (Science & Doctor & Immunology & Great Britain)  Genius of Britain II: A Roomful of Brilliant Minds, Channel 4 2012 Richard Dawkins 

 

2,558.  Edward Jenner took on the number one killer in the eighteenth century: Smallpox.  (Science & Doctor & Immunology & Great Britain)  ibid. 

 

2,559.  Jenner had demonstrated the possibility of vaccination.  (Science & Doctor & Immunology & Vaccination & Great Britain)  ibid.   

 

2,560.  Jenner is rightly regarded as the father of immunology.  (Science & Doctor & Immunology & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

 

4,814.  In 1860 Elizabeth Garrett enrolled as a surgical nurse at Middlesex Hospital but her sights were set higher ... She was also cutting up body parts in her bedroom.  This improvised education made her bold enough to take part in the hospital’s medical (not nursing) exam.  And when the time came to publish the results, one E Garret had come top.  Ordered to keep the outrage secret she went public instead.  Nine years later the French gave her an MD.  (Woman & Doctor & Nurse & Great Britain & England)  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: Forces of Nature

 

 

5,262.  The medical profession has no nation-wide policy on how to get work experience.  Which doesn’t exactly help the less well connected.  (Job & Doctor)  Richard Bilton, Who Gets the Best Jobs?  BBC 2011

 

 

13,820.  For more than a century Eastbourne has been home to large numbers of wealthy retired people.  (Murder & Doctor)  Great Crimes & Trials: John Bodkin Adams 

 

13,821.  Mrs Gertrude ‘Bobby’ Hullett had died apparently of a drugs overdose.  (Murder & Doctor)  ibid.

 

13,822.  Three days before her death Mrs Hullett had remade her will leaving the Rolls Royce to Dr Adams.  (Murder & Will & Doctor)  ibid.

 

13,823.  Press speculation became intense when it was revealed that Scotland Yard was investigating the deaths of several wealthy and elderly people.  (Murder & Doctor)  ibid.

 

13,824.  The search turned up 132 wills in which the doctor had been left some £45,000.  (Murder & Will & Doctor)  ibid.

 

13,825.  What was then the longest trial in British legal history the jury withdrew: they were back in only forty-four minutes to find Dr John Bodkin Adams not guilty.  (Murder & Doctor)  ibid.   

 

 

13,826.  Oh, that wasn’t done wickedly, God knows it wasn’t.  We always want cremations to go off smoothly for the dear relatives.  If I said I knew I was getting money under the Will they might get suspicious and I like cremations and burials to go smoothly.  There was nothing suspicious really.  It was not deceitful.  (Murder & Doctor)  John Bodkin Adams

 

 

13,827.  Easing the passing of a dying person isn’t all that wicked.  She [Morrell] wanted to die.  That can’t be murder.  It is impossible to accuse a doctor.  (Murder & Doctor)  John Bodkin Adams

 

 

13,828.  Murder ... murder ... Can you prove it was murder? ... I didn’t think you could prove it was murder.  She was dying in any event.  (Murder & Doctor)  John Bodkin Adams

 

 

13,829.  In the years after the First World War the seaside resort on the Sussex coast became a popular choice for those who were looking for a pleasant retirement home.  There was no National Health Service and a doctor's income and practice depended on how willing he was to pay house calls on those who could afford to pay for them.

Born in 1899 Dr Adams, a pious Ulsterman who had answered an advert to join a team of Christian GPs in the town shortly after scraping through his medical degree, proved himself very willing indeed.  And over the next 25 years it is widely believed he murdered hundreds of them with injections of morphine and heroin, becoming in the process one of Britain’s wealthiest GPs.  When he died he left an estate that was worth around £1.5million at today's prices but author Jane Robins, who has conducted the first detailed investigation into the sensational 1957 trial that failed to convict the doctor, believes money was not his motive.

‘As I see it Dr Adams liked to preside over death,’ she says.  ‘He liked control.  He arranged dozens of funerals of patients.  Maybe he was just being kind but I don't think so.  There are too many examples of his explosive anger when someone rejected his ‘acts of kindness’, when someone rejected his help with their finances or did not allow him to arrange their will.’  (Murder & Doctor)  The Express online article 25th May 2013 Cheryl Stonehouse ‘Dr Bodkin Adams: The Serial Killer Who Got Away’
 

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