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Deconstruct & Deconstruction
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  Dagestan  ·  Dagger  ·  Dagon  ·  Dam  ·  Damage  ·  Damn & Damnation  ·  Dance & Dancer  ·  Danger & Dangerous  ·  Daniel (Bible)  ·  Daoism & Taoism  ·  Dare & Daring-Do  ·  Dark & Darkness  ·  Dark Ages  ·  Dark Energy & Dark Matter  ·  Darts  ·  Darwin, Charles  ·  Data  ·  Dating (Romance)  ·  Daughter  ·  David (Bible)  ·  Dawn  ·  Day  ·  Deacon  ·  Dead & Death (I)  ·  Dead & Death (II)  ·  Dead Sea Scrolls  ·  Deal  ·  Death Penalty & Death Sentence  ·  Death Valley  ·  Debate  ·  Deborah (Bible)  ·  Debt  ·  Decadence & Decadent  ·  Decay  ·  Deceit & Deception  ·  Decency & Decent  ·  Decide & Decision  ·  Deconstruct & Deconstruction  ·  Deed  ·  Defeat  ·  Defect & Defective  ·  Defence & Defense  ·  Define & Definition  ·  Deformity  ·  Déjà Vu  ·  Delay  ·  Deluded & Delusion  ·  Dementia  ·  Democracy & Democratic (I)  ·  Democracy & Democratic (II)  ·  Democrats  ·  Demons  ·  Demonstrate & Demonstration  ·  Denial & Deny  ·  Denmark & Danish  ·  Dentist & Dentistry  ·  Denver & Denver Airport  ·  Depart & Part & Leave  ·  Depression & Depressed  ·  Descendant  ·  Desert  ·  Design & Designer  ·  Desire  ·  Despair & Desperation  ·  Despot & Despotism  ·  Destiny  ·  Destroy & Destruction  ·  Detain & Detention  ·  Detective & Detection  ·  Determination & Determined  ·  Detox  ·  Detroit  ·  Develop & Development  ·  Devil  ·  Devil's Triangle & Dragon's Triangle  ·  Diamond  ·  Diana, Princess of Wales  ·  Diary  ·  Dictator & Dictatorship  ·  Dictionary  ·  Diego Garcia  ·  Diet  ·  Difference & Different  ·  Dignity & Dignified  ·  Diligence & Diligent  ·  Dimension  ·  Dinner & Dinner Party  ·  Dinosaur  ·  Diplomacy & Diplomat  ·  Dirt & Dirty  ·  Disabled & Disability  ·  Disappearances & Vanishings  ·  Disappointed & Disappointment  ·  Disaster  ·  Disbelief  ·  Discipline & Disciplinary  ·  Disco & Discotheque  ·  Discover & Discovery  ·  Discreet & Discretion  ·  Discriminate & Discrimination  ·  Disease  ·  Disgrace & Dishonour  ·  Disguise  ·  Disney  ·  Dispute  ·  Dissent & Dissension  ·  Diverse & Diversity  ·  Divide & Division  ·  Divine & Divinity  ·  Diving & Divers  ·  Divorce  ·  DMT  ·  DNA  ·  Do & Done  ·  Docks & Dockers  ·  Doctor  ·  Doctrine  ·  Documentary  ·  Dog  ·  Dogma & Dogmatic  ·  Dogon  ·  Dollar & Dollar Bill  ·  Dolphin  ·  Domestic Violence  ·  Dominican Republic  ·  Donkey  ·  Door  ·  Doping & Cheating in Sport  ·  Doubt  ·  Dowsing  ·  Dracula  ·  Dragon  ·  Drama & Dramatic  ·  Draw & Drawing  ·  Dreams & Nightmares  ·  Drink & Drinking  ·  Drone & Drones  ·  Drown  ·  Drugs (I)  ·  Drugs (II)  ·  Drugs (III)  ·  Druids  ·  Drunk  ·  Dubai  ·  Dublin  ·  Duck  ·  Duels  ·  Dull  ·  Dust & Dusty  ·  Duty  ·  Dwarf & Dwarfism  ·  Dzopa & Dropa  

★ Deconstruct & Deconstruction

Deconstruct & Deconstruction: see Literature & Criticism & Novel & History & Book & Write & Language

Margaret Attwood - Jacques Derrida - Terry Eagleton - Jacques Derrida - Allan Bloom -

 

 

69,650.  I tried for the longest time to find out what deconstructionism was.  Nobody was able to explain it to me clearly.  The best answer I got was, ‘Honey, it’s bad news for you and me.’  Margaret Attwood, interview December 1986 

 

 

69,651.  A text is not a text unless it hides from the first comer, from the first glance, the law of its composition and the rules of its game.  A text remains, moreover, forever imperceptible.  Its laws and rules are not, however, harboured in the inaccessibility of a secret; it is simply that they can never be booked, in the present, into anything that could rigorously be called a perception.  Jacques Derrida, Dissemination  

 

 

69,652.  Marx was troubled by the question of why ancient Greek art retained an ‘eternal charm’, even though the social conditions which produced it had long passed; but how do we know that it will remain ‘eternally’ charming, since history has not yet ended?  Let us imagine that by dint of some deft archaeological research we discovered a great deal more about what ancient Greek tragedy actually meant to its original audiences, recognized that these concerns were utterly remote from our own, and began to read the plays again in the light of this deepened knowledge.  One result might be that we stopped enjoying them.  We might come to see that we had enjoyed them previously because we were unwittingly reading them in the light of our own preoccupations; once this became less possible, the drama might cease to speak at all significantly to us.

 

The fact that we always interpret literary works to some extent in the light of our own concerns – indeed that in one sense of ‘our own concerns’ we are incapable of doing anything else – might be one reason why certain works of literature seem to retain their value across the centuries.  It may be, of course, that we still share many preoccupations with the work itself; but it may also be that people have not actually been valuing the ‘same’ work at all, even though they may think they have.  ‘Our’ Homer is not identical with the Homer of the Middle Ages, nor ‘our’ Shakespeare with that of his contemporaries; it is rather that different historical periods have constructed a ‘different’ Homer and Shakespeare for their own purposes, and found in these texts elements to value or devalue, though not necessarily the same ones.  All literary works, in other words, are ‘rewritten’, if only unconsciously, by the societies which read them; indeed there is no reading of a work which is not also a ‘re-writing’.  No work, and no current evaluation of it, can simply be extended to new groups of people without being changed, perhaps almost unrecognizably, in the process; and this is one reason why what counts as literature is a notably unstable affair.  (Deconstruction & Literature)  Terry Eagleton, Literary Theory: An Introduction

 

 

69,653.  In language there are only differences.  Even more important: a difference generally implies positive terms between which the difference is set up; but in language there are only differences without positive terms.  Whether we take the signified or the signifier, language has neither ideas nor sounds that existed before the linguistic system, but only conceptual and phonic differences that have issued from the system.  The idea or phonic substance that a sign contains is of less importance than the other signs that surround it ... A linguistic system is a series of differences of sound combined with a series of differences of ideas; but the pairing of a certain number of acoustical signs with as many cuts made from the mass thought engenders a system of values.  (Deconstructionalism & Language)  Ferdinand de Saussure

 

 

69,654.  In fact, I attempt to bring the critical operation to bear against the unceasing re-appropriation of this work of the simulacrum by a dialectics of the Hegelian type (which even idealizes and ‘semantizes’ the value of work), for Hegelian idealism consists precisely of a releve of the binary oppositions of classical idealism, a resolution of contradiction into a third term that comes in order to aufheben, to deny while raising up, while idealizing, while sublimating into an anamnestic interiority (Erinnerung), while interning difference in a self-presence.  Jacques Derrida

 

 

69,655.  I just want to raise the question of what precisely a philosopher is doing when, in a newspaper with a large circulation, he finds himself compelled to cite private and unverifiable insults of another philosopher in order to authorize himself to insult in turn and to practice what in French is called a ‘jugement d'autorité’, that is, the method and preferred practice of all dogmatism.  I do not know whether the fact of citing in French suffices to guarantee the authenticity of a citation when it concerns a private opinion.  I do not exclude the possibility that Foucault may have said such things, alas! That is a different question, which would have to be treated separately.  But as he is dead, I will not in my turn cite the judgment which, as I have been told by those who were close to him, Foucault is supposed to have made concerning the practice of Searle in this case and on the act that consisted in making this use of an alleged citation.  Jacques Derrida

 

 

69,656.  Professors of the humanities have long been desperate to make their subjects accord with modernity instead of a challenge to it ... The effort to read books as their writers intended them to be read has been made into a crime, ever since ‘the intentional fallacy’ was instituted.  There are endless debates about methods – among Freudian criticism, Marxist criticism, New Criticism, Structuralism and Deconstructionism, and many others, all of which have in common the premise that what Plato or Dante had to say about reality is unimportant.  These schools of criticism make the writers plants in a garden planned by a modem scholar, while their own garden-planning vocation is denied them.  Allan Bloom, The Closing of the American Mind p375