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English Civil Wars
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30,502.  Isabella ... was a peace-making queen.  (England & Edward II & English Civil Wars)  Dr Helen Castor, She Wolves: England’s Early Queens Isabella and Margaret, BBC 2012

 

30,504.  It was Isabella herself who precipitated the country into civil war.  (England & Edward II & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,505.  Edward ordered that all French men and women living in England should be arrested as enemy aliens.  (England & Edward II & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,506.  Isabella, Mortimer and Prince Edward set sail for England.  (England & Edward II & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,507.  She was greeted with open arms.  (England & Edward II English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,508.  Her husband’s power simply melted away.  (England & Edward II English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,509.  She, a queen, had seized power to depose a crowned and anointed king for the first time in English history.  (England & Edward II English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

30,571.  But John wanted more money: he was determined to fund an army to win back his Plantagenet birthright.  (England & John & English Civil Wars)  Professor Robert Bartlett, The Plantagenets I, BBC 2014

 

30,572.  Once again the Plantagenets plunged England into Civil War.  (England & John & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

30,576.  DeMontford saw himself as England's saviour ... DeMontford raised an army against the king.  (England & English Civil Wars)  Professor Robert Bartlett, The Plantagenets II

 

30,577.  DeMontford's parliament of 1265 is often regarded as the forerunner of the modern parliament.  (England & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

75,744.  In 1264 England is plunged into a civil war.  (Henry III & England & English Civil Wars & Middle Ages)  Dan Jones, Britain's Bloodiest Dynasty s1e2: Hatred, Channel 5 2014

 

 

96,775.  Nearly six hundred years ago England was torn apart by a series of bloody battles for the throne.  In just thirty years the Crown changed hands seven times.  Tens of thousands were slaughtered.  It was one of the most turbulent and violent periods in British history: it’s known as the Wars of the Roses.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  Dan Jones, Britain’s Bloody Crown I, Channel 5 2016 

 

96,776.  … Henry [VI] gave another of his cousins the job of managing England for him – Lord Somerset.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.  

 

96,777.  York’s absolutely certain that he should be in charge; Margaret’s absolutely certain she should be in charge … York storms out of London and begins to gather troops.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

96,778.  Richard Duke of York has come to London expecting to be made Lord Protector of England.  He has accused the Queen’s man Somerset of treason and demanded to take his place in charge of England.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.  

 

96,780.  Henry VI has woken after a year in a catatonic stupor.  Queen Margaret’s ally Somerset is immediately released from the Tower.  It’s a disaster for the Duke of York.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

96,783.  Margaret’s troops march north … Margaret outnumbers York two to one … She brings the king along for legitimacy.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.  

 

96,784.  Less than a year later, his great ally Warwick attacks the royal army at Northampton.  Queen Margaret escapes … York has made his decision – he’s going to take the Crown … They take the Queen’s revenge.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

97,013.  1461: Britain’s weakest King, Henry VI, is barely clinging to power.  Richard Duke of York has been killed trying to snatch the throne from him.  Three months later, York’s son Edward takes his revenge on the King.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  Dan Jones, Britain’s Bloody Crown II

 

97,014.  In May 1465 Elizabeth Woodville is crowned Queen of England.  All the great Nobles attend except one.  The Earl of Warwick.  The Kingmaker.  It’s a direct snub to the King and his new Queen.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

97,016.  Redesdale demands the Queen’s family, the Woodvilles, are removed from power.  King Edward heads north to crush him.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

97,017.  After ten years in captivity, Edward releases Henry VI from the Tower.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

97,018.  Henry VI is back on the throne of England.  It’s not going well.  In March 1471 Edward IV lands in Yorkshire claiming that he only wants his Dukedom returned.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  Dan Jones, Britain’s Bloody Crown III: The Princes Must Die

 

97,019.  Henry died … Edward has had him killed.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.  

 

 

97,108.  The most infamous story in the entire blood-soaked era happens twenty years after the Wars of the Roses begin – the slaying of two innocent young boys – the Princes in the Tower.  (England & Richard III & Assassinations: Princes in the Tower & English Civil Wars)  Dan Jones, Britain’s Bloody Crown III: The Princes Must Die

 

97,109.  Richard, Duke of Gloucester, plans to become Protector of England and take control of the young King, Edward V.  He claimed he wanted to work with the King’s guardian, Earl Rivers.  Instead, Richards arrests Rivers for treason.  (England & Richard III & Assassinations: Princes in the Tower & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

97,110.  With his main opponents dead or neutralised the throne is Richard’s for the taking.  (England & Richard III & Assassinations: Princes in the Tower & English Civil Wars)  ibid.   

 

97,018.  Henry VI is back on the throne of England.  It’s not going well.  In March 1471 Edward IV lands in Yorkshire claiming that he only wants his Dukedom returned.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  Dan Jones, Britain’s Bloody Crown III: The Princes Must Die

 

97,019.  Henry died … Edward has had him killed.  (England & Henry VI & Edward IV & English Civil Wars)  ibid.  

 

 

97,183.  Henry Tudor, a minor noble and rank outsider beats the infamous Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth and becomes Henry VII, the first Tudor king.  (England & Henry VII & Richard III & English Civil Wars)  Dan Jones, Britain’s Bloody Crown IV

 

97,184.  Margaret Beaufort’s story spans the whole of the Wars of the Roses.  She works in the shadows through three decades of turmoil to protect her only child … This woman ends the conflict.  (England & Henry VII & Richard III & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

127,409.  Nearly 600 years ago England was torn apart by a series of bloody battles for the throne.  In just 30 years the crown changed hands 7 times, tens of thousands were slaughtered.  It was one of the most turbulent and violent times in British history.  It’s known as the Wars of the Roses.  The most infamous story in the entire blood-soaked era happens 20 years after the Wars of the Roses begin: the slaying of two innocent young boys – the Princes in the Tower.  (Assassinations: Princes in Tower & England & Richard III & English Civil Wars)  Dan Jones, Who Killed the Princes in the Tower? Channel 5 2019

 

127,410.  The man responsible was almost certainly the Princes’ uncle – Richard III.  (Assassinations: Princes in the Tower & England & Richard III & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

127,411.  By early Autumn the princes have simply vanished.  There’s no reliable record of their death.  No bodies are found and no-one is put on trial.  But by September almost nobody believes they are still alive.  (Assassinations: Princes in the Tower & England & Richard III & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

29,975.  The Civil War had created a new climate: the first time in their history the English could openly express ideas about tolerance.  (England & English Civil Wars)  Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch, How God Made the English II: A Tolerant People?  BBC 2012

 

29,976.  The Glorious Revolution: James II fled abroad.  (England & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

30,158.  The edges of Charles’ Great Britain were burning.  (Great Britain & England & Charles I & English Civil Wars)  Michael Wood, The Great British Story VI: A People’s History: The Age of Revolution 6/8

 

30,159.  The war would split regions, neighbours and even families.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,160.  These were British civil wars.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,161.  There were war crimes ... How far would the revolution go?  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,162.  On the streets of Dublin, Cromwell is still a swear-word.  (Great Britain & English Civil Wars & Cromwell & Ireland)  ibid.

 

 

30,295.  The competing wings for the Plantagenet family: for thirty years the Houses of York and Lancaster slogged it out in a roll call of battles we know as the Wars of the Roses.  (Great Britain & England & Medieval & English Civil Wars)  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: King Death

 

 

30,303.  Cromwell stepped up his assault on the old religion ... crushing the cult of saints and shrines.  (Great Britain & England & Cromwell & English Civil Wars & Catholicism)  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: Burning Convictions

 

 

30,317.  Here at Edgehill, Eden had become Golgotha.  Over the next long years the nations that both James and Charles yearned to bring together would tear each other apart in murderous civil wars.  Hundreds of thousands of lives would be lost in battles, sieges, epidemics, famine.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars)  Simon Sharma, A History of Britain: The British Wars

 

30,318.  What’s truly amazing and very touching about the Spring and Summer of 1642 is the abundance of evidence we have about the agonies of allegiance.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,319.  The war was over and Parliament had won.  So finally God had spoken.  Surely even Charles could see that.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

 

30,320.  On January 30th 1649 the English killed their king.  (Great Britain & England & Charles I & English Civil Wars)  Simon Schama, A History of Britain: Revolutions

 

30,321.  The poet John Milton, an ardent champion of the parliamentary commonwealth, was hired to attack the cult of the king-martyr as so much wicked idolatry.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars & John Milton)  ibid.

 

30,324.  For the Scots had invited the 20-year-old Charles II to come and be their king, and went to war on his behalf.  (Great Britain & England & Scotland & Charles II & English Civil Wars)  ibid.

 

30,325.  What kind of a republic was it supposed to be?  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars & Republic)  ibid.

 

30,326.  To Cromwell the Rump was a monstrosity.  A bastion of selfishness and greed.  More like Sodom than Jerusalem.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars & Parliament & Cromwell)  ibid.

 

30,327.  He chose to become Lord Protector – that had a good ring: authority but not tyranny.  (Great Britain & England & English Civil Wars & Cromwell)  ibid.

 

 

 

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