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Drama: see Theatre & Actor & Audience & Plays & William Shakespeare & Radio & Television

Blackadder II TV - Henry James - Kenneth Tynan - Alfred Hitchcock - Tom Stoppard - Jose N Harris - George Orwell - P G Wodehouse - Edward Albee - W H Auden - Tennessee Williams - P S Baber - David Mamet - Frank Capra - Arthur Miller - Noel Coward - Ellen DeGeneres - George Bernard Shaw - Michael Scott TV - Drama out of a Crisis: A Celebration of Play for Today TV -   

 

 

30,782.  My father blew it all on wine, women and amateur dramatics.  (England & Elizabeth & Drama)  Blackadder II: Money, Blackadder to Percy, with Baldrick

 

 

45,704.  The ever-importunate murmur, ‘Dramatize it!  Dramatize it!’  Henry James, The Altar of the Dead 1909

 

 

45,706.  The historian, essentially, wants more documents than he can really use; the dramatist only wants more liberties than he can really take.  (Drama & History)  Henry James, The Aspern Papers

 

 

45,705.  A good drama critic is one who perceives what is happening in the theatre of his time.  A great drama critic also perceives what is not happening.  (Drama & Critic & Theatre)  Kenneth Tynan, English theatre critic

 

 

45,706.  Drama is life with the dull parts cut out.  Alfred Hitchcock

 

 

45,707.  We do on stage things that are supposed to happen off.  Which is a kind of integrity, if you look on every exit as being an entrance somewhere else.  (Drama & Stage & Plays & Theatre)  Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

 

 

45,708.  Taking on too much of other people’s drama is just a poor excuse for not taking ownership and control over your own life.  José N Harris, Mi Vida

 

 

45,709.  If there really is such a thing as turning in one’s grave, Shakespeare must get a lot of exercise.  (Drama & Shakespeare)  George Orwell, All Art is Propaganda: Critical Essays

 

 

45,710.  Has anybody ever seen a drama critic in the daytime?  Of course not.  They come out after dark, up to no good.  (Drama & Critic)  P G Wodehouse

 

 

45,711.  I am not interested in living in a city where there isn’t a production by Samuel Beckett running.  (Drama & Plays)  Edward Albee

 

 

45,712.  Drama is based on the Mistake.  (Drama & Mistake)  W H Auden, The Complete Works of W H Auden: Prose III

 

 

45,713.  Symbols are nothing but the natural speech of drama.  (Drama & Symbol)  Tennessee Williams

 

 

45,714.  The stage is a magic circle where only the most real things happen, a neutral territory outside the jurisdiction of Fate where stars may be crossed with impunity.  A truer and more real place does not exist in all the universe.  (Drama & Stage & Theatre)  P S Baber, Cassie Draws the Universe

 

 

45,715.  All drama is about lies.  All drama is about something that’s hidden.  A drama starts because a situation becomes imbalanced by a lie.  The lie may be something we tell each other or something we think about ourselves, but the lie imbalances a situation.  If you’re cheating on your wife the repression of that puts things out of balance; or if you’re someone you think you’re not, and you think you should be further ahead in your job, that neurotic vision takes over your life and you’re plagued by it until you’re cleansed.  At the end of a play the lie is revealed.  The better the play the more surprising and inevitable the lie is.  Aristotle told us this.  (Drama & Lie)  David Mamet

 

 

45,716.  I made mistakes in drama.  I thought drama was when actors cried.  But drama is when the audience cries.  (Drama & Audience)  Frank Capra

 

 

45,717.  Great drama is great questions or it is noth ing but technique.  I could not imagine a theatre worth my time that did not want to change the world.  (Drama & Theatre)  Arthur Miller

 

 

45,718.  If by any chance a playwright wishes to express a political opinion or a moral opinion or a philosophy, he must be a good enough craftsman to do it with so much spice of entertainment in it that the public get the message without being aware of it.  (Drama & Plays)  Noël Coward, A Talent to Amuse: A Biography of Noël Coward

 

 

45,719.  So many people prefer to live in drama because it’s comfortable.  It’s like someone staying in a bad marriage or relationship – it's actually easier to stay because they know what to expect every day, versus leaving and not knowing what to expect.  (Drama & Relationship)  Ellen DeGeneres

 

 

50,186.  A drama critic is a man who leaves no turn unstoned.  (Criticism & Drama)  George Bernard Shaw

 

 

61,765.  The Trojan Women director Mihalis Kakogiannis … One of the most shocking stories ever written.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  Dr Michael Scott, Ancient Greece: The Greatest Show on Earth I: Democrats, BBC 2013

 

61,766.  Love, War, Sacrifice, Fear, and Death …. Utterly gripping today.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

61,767.  Ancient drama changed our world.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

61,768.  The story of theatre is the story of Athens ... One of the greatest shows on Earth.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

61,769.  Drama was perhaps the biggest innovation of them all.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

61,770.  Oedipus the King by Sophocles: It tells the story of Oedipus – a man who is destined to kill his father and marry his mother.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

61,771.  They poked fun at contemporary Athens.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

61,772.  Today just 32 of them survive in full ... Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid. 

 

61,774.  Comedy was irreverent, rude and bawdy.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

61,775.  Theatre was an institution that plugged into religious, civic, political, military aspects of ancient Athenian society … essential part of Athenian life.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

 

61,776.  Drama – that most Athenian of inventions – would thrive, spreading throughout the Greek world and beyond.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  Dr Michael Scott, Ancient Greece: The Greatest Show on Earth II: Kings

 

61,778.  Theatre had become a central part of any Greek community.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  ibid.

 

 

61,780.  Seneca wrote nine tragedies which retold stories from Greek myth.  (Greeks & Drama & Theatre)  Dr Michael Scott, Ancient Greece: The Greatest Show on Earth III: Romans     

 

 

136,271.  Play for Today: a series of single dramas broadcast by BBC television between 1970 and 1984: years of crisis when the consensus politics of Britain’s postwar world began to unravel, when industrial relations, education and the health-service faced fundamental challenges …  Play for Today reflected and responded to all this and more in more than 300 dramas shown in prime time.  (Drama & Plays & Television)  Drama out of a Crisis: A Celebration of Play for Today, BBC 2020  

 

136,272.  The Wednesday Play ran for six years and featured a much wide range of drama.  (Drama & Plays & Television)  ibid.

 

136,273.  Only Make Believe (1973: writer Dennis Potter; director Robert Knights) … Angles are so Few (1970: writer Dennis Potter; director Gareth Davies) … Mike Leigh: Hard Labour (1973) … Nuts in May (1976) … Abigail’s Party (1977) … Ken Loach: Up the Junction (1965) … Cathy Come Home (1966) … The Rank & File (1971) … Ann Scott: Angels are so Few (1970) …  Stocker’s Copper (1972) … Only Make Believe (1973) … Richard Eyre: Comedians (1979) … The Imitation Game (1980) … Country (1981) … (Drama & Plays & Television)  ibid.  

 

136,271.  Play for Today: a series of single dramas broadcast by BBC television between 1970 and 1984: years of crisis when the consensus politics of Britain’s postwar world began to unravel, when industrial relations, education and the health-service faced fundamental challenges …  Play for Today reflected and responded to all this and more in more than 300 dramas shown in prime time.  (Drama & Plays & Television)  ibid.  

 

136,272.  The Wednesday Play ran for six years and featured a much wide range of drama.  (Drama & Play & Television)  ibid.

 

136,273.  Only Make Believe (1973: writer Dennis Potter; director Robert Knights) … Angles are so Few (1970: writer Dennis Potter; director Gareth Davies) … Mike Leigh: Hard Labour (1973) … Nuts in May (1976) … Abigail’s Party (1977) … Ken Loach: Up the Junction (1965) … Cathy Come Home (1966) … The Rank & File (1971) … Ann Scott: Angels are so Few (1970) …  Stocker’s Copper (1972) … Only Make Believe (1973) … Richard Eyre: Comedians (1979) … The Imitation Game (1980) … Country (1981) … (Drama & Play & Television)  ibid.  

 

136,274.  The After Dinner Joke (1978: writer Caryl Churchill; director Colin Bucksey) …  Shakespeare or Bust (1973: writer Peter Tarson; director Brian Parker) …  Stocker’s Copper (1972: writer Tom Clarke; director Jack Gold) … Leeds United! (1974: writer Colin Welland; director Roy Battersby) …  All Good Men (1974: writer Trevor Griffiths; director Michael Lindsay-Hogg) …  Licking Hitler (1978: writer and director David Hare) … The Cheviot, The Stag & the Black Black Oil (1974: writer John McGrath; director John McKenzie) …  (Drama & Play & Television)  ibid.        

 

136,275.  Destiny (1978): ‘Cause first there’ll be the blacks and Asians.  Then the Jews and Irish.  And this ain’t easy speeches - this is true.  And then it’ll be the unions.  Oh ar make no mistake.  The Labour Party: that’ll do.  The others too.  All in the interests of the nation.  And to save the nation, they’ll destroy the nation.  All of it except themselves.  And if we let ’em, we’ve got ourselves to blame.  Our fault.  We turned our back.’  (Drama & Play & Television & Solidarity)  ibid.  Destiny: Play for Today 1978: White shop steward addresses need for solidarity with Asian colleagues

 

136,276.  The troubles in Belfast also framed the acclaimed Billy trilogy by Graham Reid made for BBC Northern Ireland in the final years of Play for Today.  The dramas explore tensions and violence in a protestant working class family.  (Drama & Play & Television & Belfast)  ibid.

 

136,277.  Out of 300 Plays for Today only a dozen were directed by a woman.  (Drama & Play & Television)  ibid.