Call us:
0-9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
  P2 Lodge  ·  Pacifism & Pacifist & Pacify  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (I)  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (II)  ·  Pagan & Paganism  ·  Pain  ·  Paint & Painting  ·  Pakistan & Pakistanis  ·  Palace  ·  Palestine & Palestinians  ·  Palin, Sarah  ·  Panama & Panamanians  ·  Pandemic  ·  Panspermia  ·  Paper & Papers & Paperwork  ·  Papua New Guinea & New Guinea  ·  Parables  ·  Paradise  ·  Paraguay  ·  Parallel Universe  ·  Paranoia & Paranoid  ·  Parent & Parenthood  ·  Paris  ·  Parkinson's Disease  ·  Parks & Parklands  ·  Parliament  ·  Parrot  ·  Particle Accelerator  ·  Particles  ·  Partner  ·  Party (Celebration)  ·  Party (Political)  ·  Passion & Passions & Passionate  ·  Past  ·  Patience & Patient  ·  Patriot & Patriotism  ·  Paul & Thecla (Bible)  ·  Pay & Payment  ·  PCP  ·  Peace  ·  Pearl Harbor  ·  Pen & Pencil  ·  Penguin  ·  Penis  ·  Pennsylvania  ·  Pension  ·  Pentagon  ·  Pentecostal  ·  People  ·  Perfect & Perfection  ·  Perfume  ·  Persecute & Persecution  ·  Persia & Persians  ·  Persist & Persevere  ·  Personality  ·  Persuade & Persuasion  ·  Peru & Peruvians & Moche  ·  Pervert & Peversion  ·  Pessimism & Pessimist  ·  Pesticide  ·  Peter (Bible)  ·  Petrol & Gasoline  ·  Pets  ·  Pharmaceutics & Big Pharma  ·  Philadelphia  ·  Philanthropy & Philanthropist  ·  Philippines & Filipino  ·  Philistines  ·  Philosopher's Stone  ·  Philosophy & Philosopher  ·  Phobos  ·  Photograph & Photography  ·  Photon  ·  Physics  ·  Piano  ·  Picture  ·  Pig  ·  Pilate (Bible)  ·  Pilgrim & Pilgrimage  ·  Pills  ·  Pirate & Piracy  ·  Place  ·  Plagiarise & Plagiarism  ·  Plague & Plagues  ·  Plan & Planning  ·  Planet  ·  Plants  ·  Plasma  ·  Plastic  ·  Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery  ·  Play & Players  ·  Plays  ·  Please & Pleasure  ·  Pluto  ·  Poetry & Poets  ·  Poison & Poisoner  ·  Poker  ·  Poland & Polish  ·  Polar Bear  ·  Police (I)  ·  Police (II)  ·  Policy  ·  Polite & Polite Society  ·  Politics & Politician (II)  ·  Politics & Politicians (I)  ·  Poll Tax  ·  Pollution  ·  Poltergeist  ·  Polygamy & Polygamist  ·  Pompeii & Vesuvius  ·  Ponzi Schemes  ·  Pool  ·  Poor  ·  Pop Music  ·  Pope  ·  Population  ·  Porcelain  ·  Pornography  ·  Portugal & Portuguese  ·  Possess & Possession  ·  Possible & Possibility  ·  Post & Mail  ·  Postcard  ·  Poster  ·  Pottery  ·  Poverty  ·  Power  ·  Practice & Practise  ·  Praise & Praiseworthy  ·  Pray & Prayer  ·  Preach & Preacher  ·  Pregnancy & Pregnant  ·  Prejudice  ·  Premonition  ·  Present  ·  President  ·  President & Presidency US  ·  Presley, Elvis  ·  Press  ·  Price  ·  Pride & Proud  ·  Priest & Priesthood  ·  Primates  ·  Prime Minister  ·  Prince & Princess  ·  Principles  ·  Print & Publish  ·  Prison & Prisoner (I)  ·  Prison & Prisoner (II)  ·  Private & Privacy  ·  Privatisation  ·  Privilege  ·  Privy Council  ·  Probable & Probability  ·  Problem  ·  Produce & Production  ·  Professional  ·  Profit  ·  Progress  ·  Prohibition  ·  Project for the New American Century & Foreign Policy Initiative  ·  Promise  ·  Proof & Prove  ·  Propaganda  ·  Property  ·  Prophet & Prophecy  ·  Prosperity  ·  Prostitute & Prostitution  ·  Protect & Protection  ·  Protest (I)  ·  Protest (II)  ·  Protestant & Protestantism  ·  Protons  ·  Proverbs  ·  Psalms  ·  Psychedelics  ·  Psychic  ·  Psychology & Psychiatry & Psychopathy  ·  Pub & Public House & Bar  ·  Public & Public Opinion  ·  Public Relations  ·  Public Sector & Public Services  ·  Puerto Rico  ·  Pulsar  ·  Punctuate & Punctuation  ·  Punish & Punishment  ·  Punk  ·  Pupil  ·  Puritan & Puritanism  ·  Purpose  ·  Putin, Vladimir  ·  Pyramids  
<P>
Plays
P
  P2 Lodge  ·  Pacifism & Pacifist & Pacify  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (I)  ·  Paedophile & Paedophilia (II)  ·  Pagan & Paganism  ·  Pain  ·  Paint & Painting  ·  Pakistan & Pakistanis  ·  Palace  ·  Palestine & Palestinians  ·  Palin, Sarah  ·  Panama & Panamanians  ·  Pandemic  ·  Panspermia  ·  Paper & Papers & Paperwork  ·  Papua New Guinea & New Guinea  ·  Parables  ·  Paradise  ·  Paraguay  ·  Parallel Universe  ·  Paranoia & Paranoid  ·  Parent & Parenthood  ·  Paris  ·  Parkinson's Disease  ·  Parks & Parklands  ·  Parliament  ·  Parrot  ·  Particle Accelerator  ·  Particles  ·  Partner  ·  Party (Celebration)  ·  Party (Political)  ·  Passion & Passions & Passionate  ·  Past  ·  Patience & Patient  ·  Patriot & Patriotism  ·  Paul & Thecla (Bible)  ·  Pay & Payment  ·  PCP  ·  Peace  ·  Pearl Harbor  ·  Pen & Pencil  ·  Penguin  ·  Penis  ·  Pennsylvania  ·  Pension  ·  Pentagon  ·  Pentecostal  ·  People  ·  Perfect & Perfection  ·  Perfume  ·  Persecute & Persecution  ·  Persia & Persians  ·  Persist & Persevere  ·  Personality  ·  Persuade & Persuasion  ·  Peru & Peruvians & Moche  ·  Pervert & Peversion  ·  Pessimism & Pessimist  ·  Pesticide  ·  Peter (Bible)  ·  Petrol & Gasoline  ·  Pets  ·  Pharmaceutics & Big Pharma  ·  Philadelphia  ·  Philanthropy & Philanthropist  ·  Philippines & Filipino  ·  Philistines  ·  Philosopher's Stone  ·  Philosophy & Philosopher  ·  Phobos  ·  Photograph & Photography  ·  Photon  ·  Physics  ·  Piano  ·  Picture  ·  Pig  ·  Pilate (Bible)  ·  Pilgrim & Pilgrimage  ·  Pills  ·  Pirate & Piracy  ·  Place  ·  Plagiarise & Plagiarism  ·  Plague & Plagues  ·  Plan & Planning  ·  Planet  ·  Plants  ·  Plasma  ·  Plastic  ·  Plastic & Cosmetic Surgery  ·  Play & Players  ·  Plays  ·  Please & Pleasure  ·  Pluto  ·  Poetry & Poets  ·  Poison & Poisoner  ·  Poker  ·  Poland & Polish  ·  Polar Bear  ·  Police (I)  ·  Police (II)  ·  Policy  ·  Polite & Polite Society  ·  Politics & Politician (II)  ·  Politics & Politicians (I)  ·  Poll Tax  ·  Pollution  ·  Poltergeist  ·  Polygamy & Polygamist  ·  Pompeii & Vesuvius  ·  Ponzi Schemes  ·  Pool  ·  Poor  ·  Pop Music  ·  Pope  ·  Population  ·  Porcelain  ·  Pornography  ·  Portugal & Portuguese  ·  Possess & Possession  ·  Possible & Possibility  ·  Post & Mail  ·  Postcard  ·  Poster  ·  Pottery  ·  Poverty  ·  Power  ·  Practice & Practise  ·  Praise & Praiseworthy  ·  Pray & Prayer  ·  Preach & Preacher  ·  Pregnancy & Pregnant  ·  Prejudice  ·  Premonition  ·  Present  ·  President  ·  President & Presidency US  ·  Presley, Elvis  ·  Press  ·  Price  ·  Pride & Proud  ·  Priest & Priesthood  ·  Primates  ·  Prime Minister  ·  Prince & Princess  ·  Principles  ·  Print & Publish  ·  Prison & Prisoner (I)  ·  Prison & Prisoner (II)  ·  Private & Privacy  ·  Privatisation  ·  Privilege  ·  Privy Council  ·  Probable & Probability  ·  Problem  ·  Produce & Production  ·  Professional  ·  Profit  ·  Progress  ·  Prohibition  ·  Project for the New American Century & Foreign Policy Initiative  ·  Promise  ·  Proof & Prove  ·  Propaganda  ·  Property  ·  Prophet & Prophecy  ·  Prosperity  ·  Prostitute & Prostitution  ·  Protect & Protection  ·  Protest (I)  ·  Protest (II)  ·  Protestant & Protestantism  ·  Protons  ·  Proverbs  ·  Psalms  ·  Psychedelics  ·  Psychic  ·  Psychology & Psychiatry & Psychopathy  ·  Pub & Public House & Bar  ·  Public & Public Opinion  ·  Public Relations  ·  Public Sector & Public Services  ·  Puerto Rico  ·  Pulsar  ·  Punctuate & Punctuation  ·  Punish & Punishment  ·  Punk  ·  Pupil  ·  Puritan & Puritanism  ·  Purpose  ·  Putin, Vladimir  ·  Pyramids  

★ Plays

Plays: see Theatre & Literature & William Shakespeare & Stage & Audience & Actor & Entertainment

Samuel Beckett - Star Trek: Voyager TV - Rude Britannia TV - Seneca - Oscar Wilde - Anton Chekhov - Doing Chekhov TV - Voltaire - Arthur Miller - Frederic Reynolds - William Shakespeare - John Dryden - Samuel Johnson - Thomas Kyd - Alexander Pope - Francis Quaries - George Bernard Shaw - T S Eliot - John Ruskin - David Mamet - Roundhead or Cavalier: Which One Are You? TV - Tom Stoppard - Edward Albee - Noel Coward - Anonymous 2011 - John Webster - Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead 1990 - The Arbor 2010 - Arthur Miller: Writer TV -

 

 

2,036.  Attacking those nerves, Samuel Beckett expressed what he saw as the bleak and desperate desolation of our lives.  But his writing is also about finding ways to face up to that, to endure, to carry on and to laugh.  (Life’s Like That & Plays)  Samuel Beckett: Not I, Sky Arts 2013 starring Lisa Dwan, Royal Court Theatre

 

2,037.  Not I is one of Samuel Beckett’s most remarkable plays written in his mid-sixties.  (Life's Like That & Plays)  ibid. 

 

2,038.  His play Waiting For Godot was first staged in Paris in 1953.  (Life’s Like That & Plays)  ibid.

 

2,039.  Not I was written in Paris in 1972.  (Life’s Like That & Plays)  ibid.

 

2,040.  Mouth:  Out into this world, this world … This God-forsaken world … What?  Who?  No! … God?  ha-ha-ha! … No feeling of any kind … What?  Who?  No!  She! … (Life’s Like That & Plays)  ibid.  

 

 

25,614.  We’re doing another Voyager play.  As soon as I can write it.  (Star Trek & Play)  Star Trek: Voyager: Muse s6e22, Kelis

 

25,615.  My patron is intrigued by the Voyager eternals.  He wants another play.  (Star Trek & Play)  ibid.  Kelis to B’Elanna

 

25,616.  You can’t change somebody’s way of life with a few lines of dialogue.  (Star Trek & Play)  ibid.  B’Elanna to Kelis 

 

 

31,443.  Plays like Entertaining Mrs Sloane and Loot [Joe Orton] with their assault on taboos of sex, class and death were a challenge to theatre audiences.  (England & Great Britain & Comedy & Plays & Theatre)  Rude Britannia III: You’ve Never Had It So Rude 3/3

 

31,444.  Orton’s last piece of notorious rude theatre was What The Butler Saw.  (England & Great Britain & Comedy & Plays & Theatre)  ibid.

 

 

45,457.  Life’s like a play; it’s not the length but the excellence of the acting that matters.  (Actor & Play)  Seneca

 

 

45,652.  The play was a great success, but the audience was a disaster.  (Theatre & Play & Audience)  Oscar Wilde

 

 

45,693.  The world is a stage, but the play is barely cast.  (Play & Stage)  Oscar Wilde

 

 

45,667.  Nina:  Your play’s hard to act; there are no living people in it.

 

Treplyov:  Living people!  We should show life neither as it is nor as it ought to be, but as we see it in our dreams.  Anton Chekhov, The Seagull

 

 

45,668.  Suppose you loved a woman – lived with her for two or three years then stopped caring for her.  As one does.  How do you behave in that case?  What if she had nowhere to go?  Anton Chekhov, The Duel, Sky Arts 2012, opening scene

 

45,669.  A duel is a duel.  I want to fight.  (Plays & Fight)  ibid.  combatant

 

 

45,670.  ‘They are really funny and fresh and they absolutely operate in our world today.’  Doing Chekhov, Reece Shearsmith

 

45,671.  ‘That’s the challenge of it: to try and make those gear-changes without looking contrived or mannered.’  ibid.  Steve Coogan  (The Dangers of Tobacco)

 

 

45,672.  The English plays are like their English puddings: nobody has any taste for them but themselves.  Voltaire

 

 

45,673.  The structure of a play is always the story of how the birds came home to roost.  Arthur Miller, Shadows of the Gods, Harper’s 1958

 

 

45,689.  It is rare for people to be asked the question which puts them squarely in front of themselves.  Arthur Miller, The Crucible

 

 

45,674.  It is better to have written a damned play, than no play at all – it snatches a man from obscurity.  Frederic Reynolds, The Dramatist 1789

 

 

45,676.  He loves no plays,

As thou dost, Antony.  William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar I ii 202

 

 

45,677.  The best actors in the world, either for tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical, pastoral, scene individable, or poem unlimited.  (Play & Actor)  William Shakespeare, Hamlet II ii 424

 

45,678.  The play, I remember, pleased not the million; ’twas caviar to the general.  II ii 465

 

45,624.  Good, my lord, will you see the players well bestowed?  Do you hear, let them be well used; for they are the abstract and brief chronicles of the time: after your death you were better have a bad epitaph than their ill report while you live.  (Actor & Plays)  ibid.  II ii 545

 

45,681.  The play’s the thing

Wherein I’ll catch the conscience of the king.  ibid.  II ii 579-580, Hamlet

 

45,679.  He would drown the stage with tears,

And cleave the general ear with horrid speech,

Make mad the guilty, and appal the free,

Confound the ignorant, and amaze, indeed,

The very faculties of eyes and ears.  (Plays & Actor)  ibid.  II ii 596

 

45,680.  I have heard,

That guilty creatures sitting at a play

Have by the very cunning of the scene

Been struck so to the soul that presently

That have proclaimed their malefactions;

For murder, though it have no tongue, will speak

With most miraculous organ.  ibid.  II ii 625

 

45,625.  Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines.  Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus, but use all gently; for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, the whirlwind of passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance that may give it smoothness.  (Actor & Plays)  ibid.  III ii 1

 

45,626.  Suit the action to the word, the word to the action, with this special observance, that you o’erstep not the modesty of nature.  (Actor & Plays)  ibid.  III ii 19

 

45,627.  O, there be players that I have seen play, and heard others praise, and that highly, not to speak it profanely, that, neither having the accent of Christians nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of nature's journeymen had made men and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.  (Actor & Plays)  ibid.  III ii 32

 

 

45,682.  If this were played upon a stage, now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.  William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night III iv 125-126

 

 

45,683.  The famous rules, which the French call Des Trois Unitez, or, the Tree Unities, which ought to be observed in every regular play; namely, is Time, Place, and Action.  John Dryden, An Essay of Dramatic Poesy 1668

 

45,684.  A thing well said will be wit in all languages.  (Play & Say)  ibid.

 

 

45,685.  Ah!  let not Censure term our fate our choice,    

The stage but echoes back the public voice;   

The drama’s laws, the drama’s patrons give,  

For we that live to please, must please to live.  Samuel Johnson, Prologue at Opening of Drury Lane 

 

 

45,686.  For what’s a play without a woman in it?  Thomas Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy 1592

1