Call us:
0-9
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
  Name  ·  Namibia & Nambians  ·  Nanotechnology  ·  NASA  ·  Nation  ·  Nation of Islam  ·  Nationalism & Nationalist  ·  Native Americans  ·  NATO  ·  Nature  ·  Navy  ·  Nazca & Nazca Lines  ·  Nazis (I)  ·  Nazis (II)  ·  Nazis, Meet the  ·  Nazis, Meet the: Adolf Hitler (I)  ·  Nazis, Meet the: Adolf Hitler (II)  ·  Neanderthal  ·  Near Death Experience  ·  Nebraska & Nebraskans  ·  Nebula  ·  Necessity  ·  Negligence & Negligent  ·  Neighbour & Neighbor & Neighbourhood  ·  Neo-Conservatives  ·  Nepal & Nepalese  ·  Nephilim, Meet the  ·  Neptune  ·  Nerves & Nervous  ·  Netherlands & Holland  ·  Neutrinos  ·  Neutron Star  ·  Nevada & Nevada Triangle  ·  New  ·  New Age  ·  New England  ·  New Hampshire  ·  New Jersey  ·  New Mexico  ·  New Orleans  ·  New Testament  ·  New World Order (I)  ·  New World Order (II)  ·  New York (I)  ·  New York (II)  ·  New Zealand  ·  News  ·  Newspaper  ·  Newton, Isaac  ·  Nibiru & Planet X  ·  Nicaragua & Nicaraguans  ·  Nice & Niceness  ·  Nigeria & Nigerians  ·  Night  ·  Nightclub  ·  Nihilism & Nihilist  ·  Nixon, Richard Milhous  ·  Noah  ·  Nobel Prize  ·  Noble & Nobility  ·  Norfolk  ·  Normal & Normality  ·  Normans  ·  North American Union & NAFTA  ·  North Carolina  ·  North Dakota  ·  North Korea & North Koreans  ·  Northern Ireland  ·  Norway & Norwegians  ·  Nose  ·  Nostradamus  ·  Nothing  ·  Nova Scotia  ·  Novels  ·  Nuclear & Nuclear Weapons (I)  ·  Nuclear & Nuclear Weapons (II)  ·  Nude & Nudity & Nakedness  ·  Number & Numbers  ·  Nun & Nunnery  ·  Nurse & Nursing  
<N>
Neutron Star
N
  Name  ·  Namibia & Nambians  ·  Nanotechnology  ·  NASA  ·  Nation  ·  Nation of Islam  ·  Nationalism & Nationalist  ·  Native Americans  ·  NATO  ·  Nature  ·  Navy  ·  Nazca & Nazca Lines  ·  Nazis (I)  ·  Nazis (II)  ·  Nazis, Meet the  ·  Nazis, Meet the: Adolf Hitler (I)  ·  Nazis, Meet the: Adolf Hitler (II)  ·  Neanderthal  ·  Near Death Experience  ·  Nebraska & Nebraskans  ·  Nebula  ·  Necessity  ·  Negligence & Negligent  ·  Neighbour & Neighbor & Neighbourhood  ·  Neo-Conservatives  ·  Nepal & Nepalese  ·  Nephilim, Meet the  ·  Neptune  ·  Nerves & Nervous  ·  Netherlands & Holland  ·  Neutrinos  ·  Neutron Star  ·  Nevada & Nevada Triangle  ·  New  ·  New Age  ·  New England  ·  New Hampshire  ·  New Jersey  ·  New Mexico  ·  New Orleans  ·  New Testament  ·  New World Order (I)  ·  New World Order (II)  ·  New York (I)  ·  New York (II)  ·  New Zealand  ·  News  ·  Newspaper  ·  Newton, Isaac  ·  Nibiru & Planet X  ·  Nicaragua & Nicaraguans  ·  Nice & Niceness  ·  Nigeria & Nigerians  ·  Night  ·  Nightclub  ·  Nihilism & Nihilist  ·  Nixon, Richard Milhous  ·  Noah  ·  Nobel Prize  ·  Noble & Nobility  ·  Norfolk  ·  Normal & Normality  ·  Normans  ·  North American Union & NAFTA  ·  North Carolina  ·  North Dakota  ·  North Korea & North Koreans  ·  Northern Ireland  ·  Norway & Norwegians  ·  Nose  ·  Nostradamus  ·  Nothing  ·  Nova Scotia  ·  Novels  ·  Nuclear & Nuclear Weapons (I)  ·  Nuclear & Nuclear Weapons (II)  ·  Nude & Nudity & Nakedness  ·  Number & Numbers  ·  Nun & Nunnery  ·  Nurse & Nursing  

★ Neutron Star

Neutron Star: see Black Holes & Universe & Space & Star & Astronomy & Cosmology & White Dwarf & Red Dwarfs & Sun & Supernovae & Pulsar & Quasar & Gamma Rays

BBC Horizon - The Universe TV - How the Universe Works TV - Alex Filippenko - Stan Woosley - Cosmic Collisions TV 

 

 

73,925.  Neutron stars are amongst the most powerful objects in our galaxy.  They are so dense that they have a gravitational pull of such strength that if anything strays too close it is dragged on to the star with extreme force.  Neutron stars seem to contain enough energy to produce these gamma ray bursts ... What was actually triggering them?  (Gamma Rays & Neutron Stars)  Horizon: The Death Star 2001

 

 

82,879.  Compared with ordinary stars, neutron stars are cosmic pebbles.  They can be as small as ten miles across.  Squeezing that huge amount of mass into such a tiny space produces an extremely dense object.  One teaspoonful of neutron star material would weigh a billion tons ... The phenomenon of rapid spin first enabled astronomers to identify neutron stars.  The Universe – Life and Death of a Star

 

 

82,880.  There are two types of neutron star: pulsars that spin rapidly and emit beeping radio pulses, and magnetars that spin more slowly and emit energy from magnetism.  Magnetars which are much rarer than pulsars have the strongest known magnetic fields in the universe.  (Neutron Star & Magnetar & Pulsar & Magnetism)  The Universe: Strange Things

 

82,881.  The pulsar/magnetar combination star is fairly young – less than nine hundred years old.  So astronomers think neutrons stars begin their lives as magnetars then settle down and become pulsars.  (Neutron Star & Magnetar & Pulsar)  ibid. 

 

 

82,887.  The super-dense core is now a neutron star.  It’s around thirty kilometres across.  And unbelievably heavy.  (Neutron Star & Universe)  How the Universe Works s1e4: Stars

 

 

80,114.  But pulsars aren’t the strangest thing a supernova can leave behind.  When stars thirty times bigger than our sun explode they produce a type of neutron star called a magnetar.  Magnetars are even stranger than pulsars and generate powerful magnetic fields.  (Magnetar & Neutron Star & Universe)  How the Universe Works s1e5: Supernovas

 

82,884.  Sometimes there’s a corpse.  The type of corpse depends on the size of a star.  Supernovas from stars more than eight times bigger than our sun leave behind a neutron star.  And it’s one of the strangest objects in the universe.  (Neutron Star & Supernova & Universe)  ibid.

 

82,885.  A teaspoon of neutron star would weigh over ninety million tons.  (Neutron Star & Universe)  ibid.

 

82,886.  Some neutron stars spin so fast they generate huge pulses of energy.  Beams of radiation blasting out of the star’s north and south poles.  This neutron star is called a pulsar.  (Neutron Star & Pulsar & Universe)  ibid.

 

 

115,555.  Neutron Stars: ‘This was a potential channel for the production of heavy elements.’  (Universe & Elements & Car & Neutron Star)  How the Universe Works s4e1: How the Universe Built Your Car, 2015

 

 

115,851.  Even after it’s gone supernova it would be a place best to avoid.  Because after it dies what’s left is one of the most extreme objects in the universe – a neutron star.  Trillions and trillions of tons of matter are compressed into a sphere that’s just tens of kilometers in diameter.  Because the neutron star is so dense it generates an intense gravitational field.  (Universe & Supernova & Neutron Star)  How the Universe Works s5e6: The Universe’s Deadliest

 

115,852.  But what about two neutron stars colliding?  Creating one of the strangest and most lethal particles in the universe … releasing a huge surge of energy that was emitted across space … It’s possible that neutron star collisions release something that is incredibly weird – a new theoretical particle called a Strangelet.  (Universe & Neutron Star & Particle)  ibid.

 

 

82,882.  Never in my wildest dreams did I think we would ever find planets orbiting a neutron star, a supernova.  (Neutron Star & Supernova & Planet)  Alex Filippenko, University of Berkeley

 

 

82,861.  We think that supernovae produce a stupendous sum of neutrinos when the core collapses to a neutron star.  (Neutrino & Supernova & Neutron Star)  Professor Stan Woosley

 

 

82,883.  Some of the most violent stellar collisions occur between neutron stars.  Neutron stars are remnants of older massive stars.  Neutron stars rotate extremely rapidly.  Some of them orbit each other in a binary system ... When they finally collide they release more energy than the sun would produce in billions of years.  The impacts are too fast for telescopes to capture.  Cosmic Collisions: Galaxies