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★ Great Britain & British History – Early to 1899 (I)

Great Britain & British History – Early to 1899 (I): see Great Britain & Great Britain Early to 1899 II III & Great Britain 1900 to Date & England & Scotland & Wales & Royal Family & Europe & European Community & Empire UK & Foreign Relations UK & United Kingdom & Empire: Roman & Anglo-Saxons & Vikings & Normans & Dark Ages & Middle Age

Secret History: The First Brit: Secrets of the 10,000 Year Old Man TV - Tony Robinson TV - Neil Oliver TV - BBC Horizon - David Mattingly - Alice Roberts TV - Jo Quinn - Roman Britain From the Air TV - The Untold Invasion of BritainTV - Roman: In Praise of Britain - Bettany Hughes TV - Dr Robert Beckford TV - Dan Snow I Mankind: The Story of All of US TV - Waldemar Januszczak TV - Michael Wood: The Great British Story TV - Francis Pryor TV - Richard D Hall & Alan Wilson TV - Simon Schama TV - David Dimbleby TV - Venerable Bede - The British TV - Robert Bartlett TV - Bloody Queens: Elizabeth & Mary TV - Elizabeth I - Tristram Hunt TV - The English Civil War TV - David Starkey TV - Lucy Worsley TV - The Last Days of Guy Fawkes TV - Dan Jones TV -

 

 

116,129.  Science is about to reveal the truth about where we come from and who we really are.  It’s a story that begins about 10,000 years ago before Britain became an island and our first ancestors arrived.  We’re following Britain’s most ambitious acient human DNA project ever.  (Great Britain & England)  Secret History: The First Brit: Secrets of the 10,000 Year Old Man, Channel 4 2018

 

116,130.  10,000 years ago marked the end of the last Ice Age.  (Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

116,132.  Cheddar Man had blue eyes … Cheddar Man had dark hair … Cheddar Man was probably darker than we initially expected … Dark to Black.  (Great Britain & England)  ibid. 

 

 

30,031.  The beautiful country that surrounds us – the rugged coastline, the rolling green hills, the craggy mountains - were formed millions of years ago when Britain was a very different place.  Giant geological forces have shaped the land we know today.  (Great Britain & England & Countryside)  Tony Robinson, Birth of Britain: Volcanoes

 

30,032.  It’s an epic story of giant volcanoes, colliding continents, and of how Britain was ripped away from what is now north America.  It’s the story of the Birth of Britain.  (Great Britain & England & Volcano)  ibid.

 

30,033.  Edinburgh had once been a volcano ... Hutton unlocked one of the greatest mysteries of the world ... The tell-tale signs of an ancient volcano.  (Great Britain & Scotland & Volcano)  ibid.

 

 

30,034.  But there’s another force that has had perhaps the greatest effect on the landscape we see around us today: Ice.  During the last Ice Age most of Britain would have been covered with a great sheet of ice up to a mile thick.  (Great Britain & England & Ice)  Tony Robinson, Birth of Britain: Ice

 

30,035.  Loch Ness was once filled by an enormous powerful glacier.  (Great Britain & Scotland & Ice)  ibid.

 

30,036.  Scientists suspect that this natural cycle of climate change is being disrupted by human activity.  (Great Britain & England & Ice)  ibid.

 

 

30,037.  The landscape around me has been shaped by ancient oceans and erupting volcanoes and ice ages.  But it’s here down in the mud that the real treasures of Britain are buried: coal, lead, even tin have been pivotal in making Britain what it is today.  (Great Britain & England & Gold)  Tony Robinson, Birth of Britain: Gold

 

30,038.  Gold: it underpinned our economies, celebrates the pinnacles of our achievements, and epitomises the extremes of luxury and wealth ... What is surprising is Britain’s gold heritage.  (Great Britain & England & Gold)  ibid.

 

30,039.  The amount of gold we can get hold of is tiny.  (Great Britain & England & Gold)  ibid.

 

 

30,040.  8,000 years ago a tsunami passed through this sea ... a phenomenally destructive force.  (Great Britain & England & Tsunami)  Tony Robinson, Britain's Stone Age Tsunami, Channel 4 2013

 

30,041.  Nearly four hundred miles of our prehistoric coast ... An astonishingly rich lifestyle ... We call this drowned world Doggerland.  (Great Britain & England & Tsunami)  ibid.

 

 

75,124.  Why do we regard some places as being more sacred than others?  (Great Britain & Stones & Monuments)  Neil Oliver, Sacred Wonders of Britain I, BBC 2014

 

75,125.  The coming of a whole new age, one that would see great monument, sacred monuments rise from the earth around Britain.  (Great Britain & Stones & Monuments)  ibid.

 

75,126.  The time of the stone circles had begun.  (Great Britain & Stones & Monuments)  ibid.

 

 

30,042.  3,350 years ago much of east Anglia was a landscape of marshland, shallow waterways and ponds.  (Great Britain & England)  Neil Oliver, Sacred Wonders of Britain II

 

30,043.  Sacred Wonders of Britain is the story of how our island has been shaped by belief.  (Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

30,044.  Even to war-hardened Roman soldiers, the Druids appeared a terrifying spectacle.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Rome)  ibid.

 

 

30,045.  This new religion was undercover and banned in the Roman empire.  (Great Britain & England & Christianity & Empire: Rome)  Neil Oliver, Sacred Wonders of Britain III

 

30,046.  It’s the Lindisfarne Gospels.  Books were rare.  (Great Britain & England & Books)  ibid.

 

 

86,201.  Historians and archaeologists have long thought that the story of the earliest Britons was lost to the mists of time ... Archaeological sites all over the UK and northern Europe are producing evidence that paints these people in a very different light ... Thanks to science we now have an increasingly clear picture of pre-history.  Horizon: First Britons, BBC 2015

 

86,202.  A culture that made jewellery, that traded and manufactured as well as hunted.  ibid.

 

86,203.  The catastrophic tsunami fatally flooded Doggerland.  (Great Britain & Tsunami)  ibid.   

 

86,204.  The idea of farming – the so-called Neolithic revolution – started in the Middle East and swept north and east across Europe ... 6,000 years ago Britain joined the revolution: the first Britons wholeheartedly signed up for farming.  (Great Britain & Farm)  ibid.

 

 

30,047.  A very fragmented territory.  There’s no Britain as such.  There are no Britons as a coherent groups.  There were lots of regional peoples.  Professor David Mattingly

 

 

94,905.  No other era has quite captured our imagination like Roman Britain ... Who were these Romans?  How did they manage to rule here for nearly four hundred years?  And why in the end did it all fall apart?  (Great Britain & Empire Rome)  Dr Alice Roberts, Roman Britain: A Timewatch Guide, BBC 2015

 

 

94,911.  The Vindolanda tablets have this extraordinary importance in ancient history.  (Great Britain & Empire Rome)  Dr Jo Quinn, Oxford University

 

 

75,127.  In 43 A.D. the Romans landed an invasion army of 40,000 men on the Kent coast.  Just four years later they started work on a new town they called Londinium.  Roman Britain from the Air, ITV 2014

 

 

30,048.  North Britain: about two thousand years ago.  The Romans ruled most of Europe but not here.  Scattered groups from all over north Britain rose up against the Roman Empire.  The Emperor they defied was Septimius Severus.  He was an African.  To steal Rome’s throne he had waded through blood.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman)  The Untold Invasion of Britain, Channel 4

 

30,049.  A war that would change Britain for ever.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman)  ibid.

 

30,050.  Road to Rome April 193 A.D. – having declared himself Emperor, Severus moved on Rome with utmost haste ... The outsider was now the most powerful man in the world.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman & Rome)  ibid.

 

30,051.  Hadrian’s Wall built almost a century earlier still marked the northern limit of Roman Britain.  It snaked across the hills all the way from the North Sea to the Irish Sea splitting the island in two.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman & Scotland)  ibid.

 

30,052.  Crippled by age, Severus was carried north.  Riding alongside was his son and heir Coracalla.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman & Rome)  ibid.

 

30,053.  Archaeologists are still discovering evidence of his huge army.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman)  ibid.

 

30,054.  The Emperor was at the head of one of the largest invasion forces the Roman Empire ever mobilised.  It needed massive logistical support.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman)  ibid.

 

30,055.  40,000 Romans marched to the foot of the Scottish highlands.  (Great Britain & England & Empire: Roman & Scotland)  ibid.

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