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Great Britain & British History – Early to 1899 (II)
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★ Great Britain & British History – Early to 1899 (II)

Great Britain & British History – Early to 1899 (II): see Great Britain & Great Britain Early to 1899 I III & Great Britain 1900 to Date & England & Scotland & Wales & Royal Family & Europe & European Community & Empire UK & Foreign Relations UK & United Kingdom & Empire: Roman & Anglo-Saxons & Vikings & Normans & Dark Ages & Middle Ages

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31,023.  Britain today is alive with music ... all these were first forged in the  energy and inventiveness of 18th century Britain.  (England & Great Britain & Music)  Suzy Klein, ‘Rule, Britannia! Music, Mischief and Morals in the 18th Century’ I, BBC 2014

 

31,024.  In the years after Purcell’s death, London was beginning to reawaken.  (England & Great Britain & Music & London)  ibid.

 

31,025.  George set about ingratiating himself with the aristocracy becoming an enthusiastic supporter of Italian Opera.  In 1719 the King stumped up £1,000 to help launch a new Royal Academy of Music.  (England & Great Britain & Music & London)  ibid.

 

 

31,026.  The British for the first time became consumers ... Music became a kind of conspicuous consumption, a driving force in a cultural boom.  (England & Great Britain & Music & Consumer)  Suzy Klein, ‘Rule Britannia! Music, Mischief and Morals in the 18th Century’ II, BBC 2014

 

31,027.  The pursuit of enjoyment was becoming more fashionable and more commercial than it had ever been.  (England & Great Britain & Music & Consumer)  ibid.

 

31,028.  Singing clubs like this were formed for the love of male companionship.  (England & Great Britain & Music)  ibid.

 

 

31,029.  Music was a galvanising force, creating a powerful sense of identity in the new nation state of Great Britain.  (England & Great Britain & Music)  Suzy Klein, ‘Rule Britannia! Music, Mischief and Morals in the 18th Century’ III, BBC 2014

 

31,030.  Working people across Britain who started using music as an escape from the toil of daily life.  (England & Great Britain & Music & Working Class)   ibid.

 

31,031.  Handel was in a unique position to harness the forces of Protestantism, nationhood and communal singing.  (England & Great Britain & Music)  ibid.

 

 

86,532.  Most people think of Italy ... The Renaissance is supposed to have passed us by.  But that isn't true.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  Dr James Fox, A Very British Renaissance, BBC 2014

 

86,533.  A handful of brilliant European artists brought the new ideas of the Renaissance to Britain.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

86,534.  [Pietro] Torrigiano’s tomb marked a turning point in British art.  It brought a modern style to a medieval country.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

86,535.  Hans Holbein arrived in England in the autumn of 1526.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

 

86,536.  The art of a people obsessed with secrets.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  Dr James Fox, A Very British Renaissance II: The Elizabethan Code

 

86,537.  A distinctive native art-form emerged.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

86,538.  [Nicholas] Hilliard’s little miniatures ... intimate, private, coded.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

86,539.  Rich and clever and sophisticated – art for an urbane and education society.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

86,540.  John Dee: the man who led the country out of its isolation ... a renaissance man.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

 

86,541.  By the early 1600s Britain had undergone a cultural revolution; the medieval world had been left behind.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  Dr James Fox, A Very British Renaissance III: Whose Renaissance?

 

86,542.  It was less about fantasies of ideal beauty and more about looking at new ways of reality.  (Renaissance & Art & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

 

78,583.  The Duke of Wellington was the most famous Briton in the first half of the nineteenth century.  His victory over Napoleon in 1815 changed the course of history.  (Great Britain & Soldier)  Wellington: The Iron Duke Unmasked, BBC 2015

 

78,584.  ‘The mark of a great general is to know when to retreat and have the courage to do it.’  (Great Britain & Soldier)  ibid.   

 

 

99,736.  It’s time to tell the history of Britain in black and well as white.  It’s the story of people who came here to make a better life.  The story of people who were carried here by force.  It’s a history written into the landscape and into the faces of the people who live here.  (Black People & Great Britain)  David Olusoga, Black and British: A Forgotten History I: First Encounters, BBC 2016

 

99,737.  Remembering the full story of how we got here is now more urgent than ever.  (Black People & Great Britain)  ibid.  

 

99,738.  Hadrian’s wall was the northern limit of a multiracial empire that stretches as far as north Africa.  (Black People & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

99,739.  We just don’t know exactly how many black people were living in Britain in the eighteenth century.  When Francis Barber was living here in this house [Samuel Johnson].  But there are estimates from the time and they put the figure at between 10,000 and 15,000.  (Black People & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

 

99,684.  Among the men who served under Admiral Nelson were a hundred black sailors.  (Black People & Navy & Great Britain)  David Olusoga, Black and British: A Forgotten History II: Freedom *****

 

99,685.  One of the most dramatic and shocking chapters in the history of black Britain.  (Black People & Slavery & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

99,686.  Sierra Leone, West Africa: here beneath the trees are the ruins of a slave fortress.  The first fortress was built here in the seventeenth century.  It’s lain abandoned, forgotten, for almost two centuries.  It was in places like this that the British slave trade began.  Slaves were bought, sold and imprisoned here before being shipped to British colonies in North America and the Caribbean.  (Black People & Slavery & Sierra Leone & Great Britain)  ibid.  

 

99,687.  The British were masters of the slave trade.  In total Britain transported more than three million people in slavery.  (Black People & Slavery & Sierra Leone & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

99,688.  Some of them, and this included the children, had DY, or Duke of York, burned into their chest.  (Black People & Slavery & Sierra Leone & Great Britain)  ibid.  

 

99,689.  Tobacco is an extremely labour-intensive crop.  It requires constant care and attention.  And each leaf is picked by hand.  At first these fields were worked by endured servants … But there was never enough labor to satisfy demand.  (Black People & Slavery & Tobacco & Great Britain)  ibid.

 

99,690.  This law makes it legal to kill a black person.  (Black People & Slavery & Great Britain)  ibid.    

 

99,691.  This [British] offer of freedom encouraged thousands of American slaves to escape, risking their lives to reach a fleet of ships waiting on the James River.  (Black People & Slavery & Great Britain)  ibid. 

 

99,692.  ‘This was the first mass liberation of slaves in the British empire … Britain paradoxically was still the world’s largest slave trader.’  (Black People & Slavery & Great Britain)  ibid.    

 

99,693.  A man who went on to take Georgian Britain by storm.  One of the former slaves who managed to get out of America was a teenage boxer from Staten Island called Bill Richmond … And then in his early 40s he made the most bizarre decision: he gave it all up [high social status] to become a bare-knuckle boxer in London  … He was challenged to a fight: it was the spark that set him on course to become a boxing star, and one of Georgian Britain’s most famous celebrities.  The world of prize-fighting, of bare-knuckle boxing was special to the British in a way that no other sport was, because the fighter was said to be the embodiment of the national characteristics of bravery and manliness and resilience, all the things the British liked to believe made them who they were.  Now, these were the same days when Britain was the biggest slave-trading nation power in world, and yet by entering into this world, [Repton club], into this sport, Bill Richmond, a black guy, a former slave, was able to become not just a star but a national hero.  (Black People & Slavery & Boxing & Great Britain)  ibid.

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