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England 1456 – 1899 (IV)
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★ England 1456 – 1899 (IV)

England 1456 – 1899 (IV): see England & England: 1456 – 1899 (I) & (II) & (III) & England: Early – 1455 (I) & (II) & England: 1900 – Date & Great Britain & United Kingdom & Scotland & Wales & Ireland & Northern Ireland & English Civil Wars & Anglo Saxons & Roman Empire & British Empire & UK Foreign Relations & Vikings & Normans & Europe & War

Dan Snow TV - William Wordsworth - Empires: Queen Victoria's Empire TV - The Boleyns: A Scandalous Family TV - Royal Bastards: Rise of the Tudors TV - Tony Robinson TV -   

 

 

78,273.  Things could have been very different: in the summer of 1588 Elizabeth and the people of England faced an overwhelming threat.  The country was on the verge of invasion.  (England & Navy & Spain)  Dan Snow, Armada: 12 Days to Save England, BBC 2015

 

78,274.  Drake was England's most brazen pirate.  (England & Navy & Pirate & Spain)  ibid.

 

 

78,601.  Summer 1588 England was under attack from the most powerful naval force on Earth.  (England & Navy & Spain)  Dan Snow, Armada: 12 Days to Save England II

 

78,602.  125 ships carrying 23,000 men.  More than just an invasion this was a religious crusade sent to crush a heretic nation.  (England & Navy & Spain)  ibid.

 

 

78,704.  Summer 1588: Philip II, Catholic King of Spain, was on the verge of shaping Europe.  The most powerful naval force on Earth, the mighty Spanish Armada, had sailed through the Channel.  Its aim to crush heretic England and take the crown off Queen Elizabeth.  (England & Navy & Spain)  Dan Snow, Armada: 12 Days to Save England III

 

78,705.  Philip assumed his army and his Armada could simply send notes to one another saying when and where they should meet.  (England & Navy & Spain)  ibid.

 

78,706.  Monday 8th August 1588 has gone down as the down of one of the greatest naval battles in history ... It was a bloodbath.  (England & Navy & Spain)  ibid.

 

78,707.  9th August: The wind direction suddenly changed.  (England & Navy & Spain)  ibid. 

 

 

47,930.  From this day in 1830 nothing would be the same again.  This is where the modern world begins.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  Locomotion: Dan Snow’s History of Railways, BBC 2013

 

47,931.  One billion passengers still travel these lines each year.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,932.  By the early 1800s British was at the centre of a world-wide trading web.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,933.  The people fell in love with them.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,934.  The Stockton & Darlington became world famous.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,936.  The Railways came along and changed everything.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.    

 

 

47,937.  In the late 1830s a great swathe of Victorian London was ripped apart.  The railway had arrived in the capital.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  Locomotion: Dan Snow’s History of Railways II

 

47,938.  Hills was being mined and blasted, valleys were being bridged.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,939.  Trains could already hit fifty miles an hour.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,940.  The working classes got their first taste of the railway … cheap excursions were being offered.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,941.  As the investors vowed never to gamble on the railways again, the whole banking system teetered on the edge.  The government had to step in.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

47,942.  Britain begins to export the railways to the rest of the world.  (Railways & Trains & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  ibid.

 

 

50,127.  – An inventive Age

Has wrought, if not with speed of magic, yet

To most strange issues.  I have lived to mark

A new and unforeseen creation rise

From out the labours of a peaceful Land

Wielding her potent enginery to frame

And to produce, with rests not night or day,

Industrious to destroy!  (Manufacturing & Factory & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  William Wordsworth, The Manufacturing Spirit 

 

 

50,128.  black the cloth

In heavy wreaths folds over every Nation: cruel Works

Of many Wheels I view, wheel without wheel, with cogs tyrannic,

Moving by compulsion each other; not as those in Eden, which,

Wheel within wheel, in freedom revolve, in harmony and peace.  (Manufacturing & Industry & Factory & Engineering & Industrial Revolution & Great Britain & England)  William Wordsworth, A Vision of Albion (Selections from Jerusalem)

 

 

31,195.  A young girl who grew up to reign over the widest empire in the history of the world.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire)  Empires: Queen Victoria’s Empire I: Engines of Change, PBS 2001

 

31,196.  Britain had pioneered the age of Steam.  (England & Great Britain & Steam & Victoria & British Empire & Industrial Revolution)  ibid.

 

31,197.  Like her people she was a mass of contradictions.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire)  ibid.

 

31,198.  Prince Albert had won the hand of the Queen but he would have a hard fight to win the hearts of the people.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire)  ibid.

 

31,199.  Isambard Kingdom Brunel – he was the most famous engineer in the world.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Engineering)  ibid.

 

31,200.  He had conceived of the SS Great Britain as the first all-iron steamship.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Engineering & Ship)  ibid.

 

31,201.  Disraeli’s opportunism earned him many enemies in parliament.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Politics)  ibid.

 

31,202. A lifelong feud between the two politicians – Disraeli and Gladstone.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Politics)  ibid.

 

31,203.  Revolution would eventually topple the thrones of France, Russia, Germany, Austria, Italy, Spain and Turkey.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Revolution)  ibid.

 

31,204.  Paxton’s beautiful building won the hearts of the nation ... the Crystal Palace ... The Great Exhibition was Britain’s show.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Buildings)  ibid.

 

 

31,205.  The British would now embark on the greatest period of expansion in their history.  But their attempt to export Victorian values around the world would provoke a clash of cultures and convictions.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire)  Empires: Queen Victoria’s Empire II: Passage to India

 

31,206.  A great army of servants who catered to the needs of the British in India.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & India & Servant)  ibid.

 

31,207.  Crimea: it had been forty years since the British army had fought a major war.  It was ill prepared and worse led.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Crimean War)  ibid.

 

31,208.  The Great Mutiny had begun.  At first it was confined to one area in the north.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & India & Rebellion)  ibid.

 

31,209.  The beleaguered British garrisons held out week after week under constant bombardment.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & India & Rebellion)  ibid.

 

 

31,210.  Death robbed the Queen of her beloved Prince Albert.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire)  Empires: Queen Victoria’s Empire III: The Moral Crusade

 

31,211.  They had pioneered the age of steam.  They made more than half the world’s industrial goods, and three-quarters the world’s trade was carried in British ships.  But despite this success Victoria’s cities were pits of poverty and deprivation.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire & Steam & Manufacturing & Trade & City & Industrial Revolution)  ibid.

 

31,212.  Disraeli treated her not only as his monarch but as a woman and a woman of intelligence.  (England & Great Britain & Victoria & British Empire)  ibid.

 

 

31,213.  The powers of Europe conducted a brutal race for colonies, a race that would become known as the Scramble for Africa.  (England & Great Britain & Empire & Africa)  Empires: Queen Victoria’s Empire IV: The Scramble for Africa

 

31,214.  The Wild West was tame compared to Kimberley.  Here there was a bar for every sixteen men.  And shootings were an everyday occurrence.  But Rhodes thrived as a diamond digger.  (England & Great Britain & British Empire & Africa & South Africa & Diamonds)  ibid.

   

31,215.  RhodesDoes this House think that it is right that men in a state of pure barbarism should have the vote?  Treat the natives as a subject people.  Be the lords over them.  The native is to be treated as a child and denied the franchise.’  (England & Great Britain & British Empire & Africa & Racism & South Africa)  ibid.

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